#1
Is it just me, or do emulated headphone jacks suck?

I have found that it makes such a difference that I need to use a distortion pedal to have a similiar tone when listening to the emulated headphones compared to I don't need to use a distortion pedal when the amp is connected to a speaker instead of headphones.

What's with the "emulated" in "emulated headphone jack" if it doesn't even emulate the cab sound?

Are there any amps that use DSP to actually attempt to emulate the cab sound comming out of the "emulated headphone jack"?


I like to play at night often when my dad and the neighbors are sleeping and I want it to sound the same on the headphones as it does on the cab.


Yeah I guess practicing the notes is more important than the tone (I saw that on another thread about emulated headphone jacks), but the tone really would be nice, especially if I attempt to record by connected the emulated headphone jack to an audio interface then the tone is critical if I don't want to use any software plugins.

I have "recorded dry" before connected to the emulated headphone jack with low gain and no effects and then added in software plugins, but its still not like the real thing.


If it matters, my amp is a Marshall MG 15 solid state combo amp.
Last edited by dietermoreno at May 17, 2013,
#2
It depends on the amp and the quality of the output.

But mostly it's because people expect their amp to sound like its running through a 4x12 through headphone speakers the size of a peach.

That or its your MG.
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#3
depends on the amp. in your case, it's probably the combination of a shitty emulated output and the mg. there are some amps with pretty awesome emulated outputs - my kustom coupe, for instance.
#4
I would figure that, without power tubes cooking, it would sound different no matter what.

Your amp is even worse than mine, soz...
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#5
Quote by DeathByDestroyr
I would figure that, without power tubes cooking, it would sound different no matter what.


Oh, well I didn't even think about that. Maybee I don't understand how guitar amps work well enough.

I assumed that the power tubes (power transistors in my case) had their power supply connected to an attenuator when placing a cable in the emulated headphones jack depresses a switch.

I didn't know that the power gain stage isn't even connected when the emulated headphones jack is in use.


I guess that makes sense that you can not simply attenuate the power gain stage, and if you connected the output of the power gain stage to the load of the headphones you could bring the output transformer into over saturation (I killed my tube amp by not connecting its speaker output to a speaker load).

Even though solid state amps don't use output transformers, I don't think connecting my headphones to my speaker jack would be a good idea!
Last edited by dietermoreno at May 17, 2013,
#6
What kind of headphones do you have? In ear buds wont work. You need large drivers like the kind found in studio type headphones for the emulation to sound right.

Sony MDR-7506 is what I use. The lower end response is so good it tickles my earlobes. And they are closed back so I can really crank them and nobody hears

Check out BandH.com they have a tone of headphones
What the hell!!!
#7
Quote by danvwman
What kind of headphones do you have? In ear buds wont work. You need large drivers like the kind found in studio type headphones for the emulation to sound right.

Sony MDR-7506 is what I use. The lower end response is so good it tickles my earlobes. And they are closed back so I can really crank them and nobody hears

Check out BandH.com they have a tone of headphones


I don't believe that's gonna help him, his amp is shitty and that's the bigest reason why it sounds bad.
#8
Quote by dietermoreno
Oh, well I didn't even think about that. Maybee I don't understand how guitar amps work well enough.

I assumed that the power tubes (power transistors in my case) had their power supply connected to an attenuator when placing a cable in the emulated headphones jack depresses a switch.

I didn't know that the power gain stage isn't even connected when the emulated headphones jack is in use.


I guess that makes sense that you can not simply attenuate the power gain stage, and if you connected the output of the power gain stage to the load of the headphones you could bring the output transformer into over saturation (I killed my tube amp by not connecting its speaker output to a speaker load).

Even though solid state amps don't use output transformers, I don't think connecting my headphones to my speaker jack would be a good idea!

I have no idea what's going on.
"If you're looking for me,
you better check under the sea,
because that's where you'll find me..."
#9
I have Seinheiser HD 205 headphones that cost my family $70 at RadioShack for my Christmas present 2 years ago.

They sound as good for listening to music as my car stereo (well actually they sound even better than my car stereo right now since my muffler is broken ), but not so good with listening to my emulated speaker jack of my guitar amp.

So then I guess its probably the shitty amp.
Last edited by dietermoreno at May 18, 2013,