#1
My friend was over, and I was just playing some pentatonic stuff, and he almost immediately starting singing "Ching chow II yo ching po" (very stereotypical chinese like words).

This mad me angry, as I highly doubt he would hear it as chinese if it were in the context of a country song or a blues solo. So I kicked him out of my house.
#2
Well a lot of traditional asian music actually is pentatonic. I wouldn't have kicked him out of my house but you can get a lot of mileage out of the pentatonic (from blues to asia). Just experiment a little more with the scale and i'm sure you can break out of that asian sound you're trying to evidently avoid.
#3
The pentatonic notes actually show up in every codified system of music. Some asian and indian music relies on it very heavily.
#4
Well....it sounds like what we make Asian music sound like. True asian music doesn't use the same pitch set we do, though they DO have a PENTA (5 note) system which is used sometimes. The intervallic distances are different, however.http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=HfrOSJRCsfM

But the fake asian music we've been grass fed is pentatonic.
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Last edited by Artemis Entreri at May 17, 2013,
#5
^^ Same as with Egyptian Music.

I doubt (if they even had music at all) that it would sound like The typical Age of empires soundtrack.

It's still neat though.

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#7
I don't know guys, pentatonic sounds just bluesy to me. I know other scales that sound really asian, but I don't recall their names though.
#8
asians use it a lot. i think some of the traditional chinese harps (sorry i'm whitewashed) are tuned to that scale.
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#9
Am i wrong in saying that the major pentatonic will sound more asain and the minor sounds bluesy. The major pentatonic definitely has a more asain vibe to it
#10
Quote by voodooenglish
Am i wrong in saying that the major pentatonic will sound more asain and the minor sounds bluesy. The major pentatonic definitely has a more asain vibe to it

considering it's completely subjective, you're not going to be right or wrong in any meaningful sense of either word
Last edited by :-D at May 17, 2013,
#12
Your friend, while a dick, is somewhat correct in implying that major pentatonic can have an Asian vibe in the right context.
#13
Any style of music can be identified by the most commonly used characteristic scales. You are right in identifying a certain "asian-ness" to pentatonic scale harmony due to its prevalence in traditional music making. In fact you find the use of the pentatonic in many musical cultures around the world from. It is one of the basic building blocks of harmony and melody.
The pentatonic scale is a remarkably logical and simple scale. If you were too look at it in the context of the key of C you would find that:
C is the tonic, G is its dominant
D is the dominant of G
A is the dominant of D
E is the dominant of A
So purely by linking dominants you would get the notes:
C D E G A which is the (major) pentatonic scale
if you use these same notes but start on A you get:
A C D E G which is the minor pentatonic scale.
The two scales are the same notes entirely, so they can both exhibit the same "asian-ness" or "bluesy-ness" or whatever else you hear in them purely depending on the context and order in which you play them.
Hope this helps.
Last edited by BoogieShinbones at May 18, 2013,
#14
We are conditioned by our cultural experience to associate certain pitches, rhythms etc with certain things.

Quote by macashmack


So I kicked him out of my house.


Over that? You got problems bro
Last edited by griffRG7321 at May 18, 2013,
#15
Quote by macashmack
My friend was over, and I was just playing some pentatonic stuff, and he almost immediately starting singing "Ching chow II yo ching po" (very stereotypical chinese like words).

This mad me angry, as I highly doubt he would hear it as chinese if it were in the context of a country song or a blues solo. So I kicked him out of my house.


Ha ha great story

This made me laugh
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#16
I think the pentatonic is much more common in virtually all folk musics, all over the world. I think the way you play it and accent it will make it sound more asian. But yeah, lots of asian music has that sound. It's really easy to harmonize if everyone's playing pentatonic, it's difficult to find notes that REALLY clash. That's probably why it's common in folk music.
Luke Mosse Guitar Teacher in Bristol, UK
#17
I see it as a matter of intention. The whole context will make it sound like what you intend it to sound. If you have a blues background, it will sound bluesy, if you have an asian background it will sound asian. And if you have no background, your brain will link that sound (be it a sequence of pitches, the melody it self, or the rythmn of it all) with a previous heard/known background, making you *think it sounds asian.
#18
Quote by macashmack
My friend was over, and I was just playing some pentatonic stuff, and he almost immediately starting singing "Ching chow II yo ching po" (very stereotypical chinese like words).

This mad me angry, as I highly doubt he would hear it as chinese if it were in the context of a country song or a blues solo. So I kicked him out of my house.

Some friend you are lol. Funny, though.