#1
I use .11 strings in E standard, and while I can get a great hard picked rhythm tone without losing tuning, it is significantly more difficult to hammer/pull off with these huge beasts. The issue is that I pick rather hard, and .10's usually break quickly when I play them (I wouldn't even want to imagine .9's.) Any advice?
#2
Well you'll probably have to adapt your technique in one direction or the other. Either learn to control your picking a little better so you're not so heavy handed and use lighter strings, or practice hammer ons and pull offs until your fingers are used to .11s. I would be inclined to learn better control over picking myself though.
#3
I always play with 11's in standard, I just find that the tone comes through so much better with slightly thicker strings. It may be just me but I think it makes a huge difference!
#5
Quote by alexctc
I always play with 11's in standard, I just find that the tone comes through so much better with slightly thicker strings. It may be just me but I think it makes a huge difference!



Seriously. It sounds so much more awesome when playing rhythm. You can beat the hell out of the strings, and they won't go sharp of fall out of tune. My lead playing is suffering though . I'm going to restring my Agile in .10's and see how that turns out.
#6
Quote by WaltTheWerewolf
You'll get used to it...eventually 10s will feel like yarn, but you might just be picking too hard. Playing hard on 10s might break em, playing hard on 11s might not break em but wont always sound the best.

This. I play 11s in E/Eb and am so used to it now that anything smaller feels strange.
#7
Just play them. I had the same problem when I went to .11 strings at first, but now it's a breeze.
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#8
I'd use 11's if I could be bothered setting up my 6 string, so I just stick with 10's.
"I think, as a musician, you should practice your technique to be as good as you need to be to facilitate whatever ideas come into your head."
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#9
I've actually found that thicker strings have more sound than thinner ones. And that applies to hammer ons and pull offs. I also find it easier to Tap with thicker strings. I use .11s on Standart tuning on a LP and never had problems with that.
#10
If you break .10s you should probably switch to .09s or .08s and focus on your technique. Because if you’re hitting the strings that hard you’re going to be constantly off key and nobody wants to listen to that shit.
#11
I used to break strings like crazy, especially during big bends. Then I got some Graph Tech Stringsaver saddles and I almost never break a string now.

No metal on metal friction at the saddle anymore.



Last edited by peskypesky at May 19, 2013,
#12
String breakage probably has nothing to do with your pick attack. Where do they break?
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#13
I use 11-52's for standard tuning. You get used to them eventually. Also, the longer you have them on, the less tense they become. I don't know if that's some property of the metal, or if I'm just getting accustomed to the tension. Fresh strings of the same guage always feel tighter for some reason.

I would suggest inspecting your bridge and nut for rough spots if string breakage is a common problem.
#14
String breakage is usually due to saddle issues, old strings (sometimes the strings you buy in stores are old in the package) and bad technique.

In the last case, it helps to realize that you bought an electric guitar because it reduces the need to whang on the guitar for more volume. You can get the same dynamics from light strings, low action and modified pick action as you can from heavy strings, high action and acoustic guitar-level strumming.

Old strings develop weak spots due to sometimes-unseen corrosion. Strings that have been in the store for quite a while will do that even in their packaging. I use 10's on LP-type scale guitars, 9's on strat-scale guitars and 9's on Floyd-equipped LPs. I generally buy fairly cheap strings (GHS Boomers) with the occasional celebratory foray into Dean Markley Cold Steels or Elixirs. I can't remember the last time I broke a string.

Saddle burrs account for the demise of more strings than anything else. A sharp edge on a bridge saddle will just slice them up.
#15
Quote by dspellman


Saddle burrs account for the demise of more strings than anything else. A sharp edge on a bridge saddle will just slice them up.


Metal fatigue will occur at the saddle even if there isn't a burr. Its just a fact of physics that metal rubbing on metal has a much higher coefficient of friction than metal on teflon. Which is why, again, I recommend the String Saver saddles.
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