wonderlustking5
Registered User
Join date: Mar 2013
66 IQ
#1
I ( at the moment ) only play gypsy music, mainly- Gogol Bordello

My problem is that Gogol songs are like 60/40 what I mean by that like 60% of their songs are strummed flamenco style and 40% are strummed with a pick. So should I stay with a classical or get a flamenco ?

Note: The guitarist in Gogol Bordello uses a Takamine TC132SC ( which I'm pretty sure its a classical guitar ) but still... he's a pro, im just a beginner.

Examples
http://youtu.be/EJlPG8lsYY0?t=1m31s - Flamenco

http://youtu.be/qbdxI1Oh7kM?t=21s - Normal strumming
Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
288 IQ
#2
Quote by wonderlustking5
My problem is that Gogol songs are like 60/40 what I mean by that like 60% of their songs are strummed flamenco style and 40% are strummed with a pick. So should I stay with a classical or get a flamenco ?
The most salient difference between a classical and a flamenco guitar is the "golpeador", which basically strengthens the sound board so you can bang on it.

So, if you're moving forward with the notion of learning and using a lot of flamenco percussive playing, you should probably go for a "gypsy jazz" type instrument.

If not, then a standard nylon string guitar will suffice. You can play nylon strings on either instrument with a pick, it does shorten string life though.
Bikewer
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2010
65 IQ
#3
The traditional flamenco guitar is somewhat different from a classical... Cedar top, friction pegs, light construction, the "golpeador" to protect the soft cedar from the tapping....

However, most contemporary players seem happy to play a regular classical. Who wants to fool with friction tuners?
Easy enough to apply a stick-on golpeador plate. Not a bad idea at any rate, if you plan to use a pick now and then... Else your guitar will end up looking like Willie's.....
Captaincranky
Registered User
Join date: Sep 2011
288 IQ
#4
Quote by Bikewer
The traditional flamenco guitar is somewhat different from a classical... Cedar top, friction pegs, light construction, the "golpeador" to protect the soft cedar from the tapping....

However, most contemporary players seem happy to play a regular classical. Who wants to fool with friction tuners?
Easy enough to apply a stick-on golpeador plate. Not a bad idea at any rate, if you plan to use a pick now and then... Else your guitar will end up looking like Willie's.....
I think the whole "friction tuner" idea is carrying the "traditional flamenco" concept a bit too far.

Here read this page from Sam Ash: http://www.samash.com/opencms/opencms/samash/library/main/Flamenco_Guitar_or_Classical_Guitarx_How_Do_They_Differx.html and we can talk some more.

I'm throwing this Wiki page about "Gypsy Jazz" in for the sake of conversation. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gypsy_jazz It's the "mustache bridge" I get the biggest kick out of with these instruments..
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 19, 2013,
Bikewer
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2010
65 IQ
#5
I admit that the last reading I did on the subject was some Guitar Player articles I read maybe 20 years ago.....
Likely the community has moved on.

There is a tendency for folks to use "Flamenco" to describe any vaguely Latin-flavored guitar style.....