#1
Hi,
I have an EC-1000 with the sd pickups. This is a reasonably expensive guitar for me (ie I can't afford anything like it again). I play a lot of covers and have it tuned in standard. I enjoy doing covers and all, but I've started to do my own stuff recently and really want to continue. The thing is, I want to do downtuned sludgy stuff, like stoner and doom tones. I think the guitar sounds fine when downtuned but am concerned that tuning up and down and adjusting the truss will damage the guitar in the long term.
should I be looking for a second guitar, and if so, which should I downtune? The second guitar is going to be much cheaper, would cheapness be hidden more in the downtuned high gain sludge tones rather than an e-standard covers guitar (lots of clean)
Last edited by innovine at May 19, 2013,
#2
You're probably better off getting a second guitar if you plan on changing tunings more than occasionally or if you plan on playing in a few tunings a lot of the time.

In your position, I'd downtune your current guiar- ESP/LTD have a pretty solid rep for all kinds of metal.

I wouldn't cheap out to the second guitar, either. Be patient, save up your money, and get something equivalent in quality to your current axe. If you go used, you might even be able to find a deal!
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
#3
That's the problem with a nice guitar, you wanna use it for everything
epiphone sg is just about affordable, perhaps thats nice when downtuned (probably aiming at c or c# depending on what the results are like)
#6
I have to say that for stoner and sludge tones an SG of some kind is basically standard issue. You'll need to properly beef up the strings (at least an 11 or 12 set for C standard) but the SG is the stoner and sludge sound.
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#7
Quote by innovine


should I be looking for a second guitar, and if so, which should I downtune? The second guitar is going to be much cheaper, would cheapness be hidden more in the downtuned high gain sludge tones rather than an e-standard covers guitar (lots of clean)


You might actually get more striking low tones if you have a longer scale. You might also consider a 7-string. You might also consider getting both in a single, much less expensive guitar.

Rondo Music has the Agile AL-727 available in several colors including gloss and flat black:



24-fret ebony fretboard, jumbo frets, 27" scale, 7-string, 14" radius, etc. You'll be very surprised at the quality for $399 (!).

http://www.rondomusic.com/AL3000727EBtribalred.HTML

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#8
If I were looking at anything lower than Drop C, I'd just buy a 7-string. Jackson makes some decent 7-strings.
#9
One other choice:

You might consider a Variax. I've got a JTV-89F (Floyd) on the way. It looks like a blood-red (black is the other available color) superstrat with a standard set of mag pickups. 16" radius fretboard, 24 frets, 25.5" scale, etc.



http://line6.com/jtv-89f/features

In addition to the standard pickups, however, it comes with piezo saddles (Graphtech on the Floyd, something else on the hard tail) that feed into the Variax electronics. These electronics include 29 (on the new models) different guitar (and other stringed instrument) models, and they're very good.

But perhaps of greater interest is the second dial that allows you to select alternate tunings. Unlike the Robot-type guitars from Gibson, these do NOT change the tension on the strings at all. No heavy strings, no floppy bottom end, etc. and you can use vibrato and bending exactly as you would your standard guitar. The Variax uses pitch-replacement technology. You can drop at least an octave per string if you need to (this allows you to play bass on the thing!). You can use software to edit the alternate tuning knob to whatever you like, and you can also reset the stock settings just by changing something on the guitar itself, but these are what's built in:


Model. Access the alternate tunings you created using Variax Workbench™, Line 6′s virtual guitar workbench software.

Standard (E A D G B E). By far the most popular tuning on a 6-string guitar.

Drop D (D A D G B E). The low E string is dropped down a full step from Standard tuning. This popular tuning has been used by bands and artists such as Rage Against the Machine, Soundgarden, Pantera and even The Beatles on "Dear Prudence."

1/2 Down (Eb Ab Db Gb Bb Eb). Each string is tuned down one half step compared to Standard tuning. Some of the greatest guitarists of all time, including Jimi Hendrix and Stevie Ray Vaughn, played almost exclusively 1/2 Down.

Drop Db (Db Ab Db Gb Bb Eb). Compared to Drop D, every string is dropped an additional half step. This tuning was made famous by Eddie Van Halen on the 1981 song, "Unchained,” and popularized by bands such as Nirvana on their In Utero album, Evanescence, Linkin Park, System of a Down and more.

1 Down (D G C F A D). This tuning is one full step down from Standard, and used by artists and bands including Elliot Smith, John Fogerty and Shadows Fall. You can also find it on Nirvana's "Come as You Are," "Lithium" and "Drain You," as well as Metallica’s "Sad but True" and "Devil's Dance.”

Drop C (C G C F A D). Drop C is like a standard D tuning, with a dropped C for a more brutal sound. It’s popular with a wide variety of rock and metal bands including Carcass, Metallica, System of a Down and more.

m3 DOWN (Db Gb B E Ab Db). Compared to Standard tuning, all the strings are tuned down by three half steps. This tuning can be found on songs by Black Sabbath and others.

Drop B (B F# B E G# C#). This tuning is one and one half steps down from Drop D, and has been used by heavy metal bands such as Slayer, Slipknot and Tool.

M3 Down (C F Bb Eb G C). This tuning is a major third lower than Standard tuning. You can find it on “No One Knows” and other Queens of the Stone Age tracks, as well as songs by The Misfits and more.

Drop Bb (Bb F Bb Eb G C). Two full steps down from Drop D, this tuning is used by artists including Static-X, Bring Me the Horizon, Spineshank and Sevendust.

Baritone (B E A D F# B). This tuning is popular with a variety of hard rock and metal bands, from the Foo Fighters to Carcass.


You can also go higher, into banjo and mandolin territory, or do open tunings for the resonator models and slide, etc.

Thus you end with all the possibilities on one guitar, available with a rotation of the dial, immediately.

But wait, there's more.

If you have one of the Pod floor models (XT, X3, HD500), you can run what amounts to a heavy-duty ethernet cable from the guitar into the Pod. You can store alternate tunings (as well as guitar model, amp/cab/fX choices) in a user preset and simply switch all of them with a single stomp.
#10
Quote by dspellman
*variax*


Dude, are you selling these things? Everything about that post sounds like a sales pitch...
R.I.P. My Signature. Lost to us in the great Signature Massacre of 2014.

Quote by Master Foo
“A man who mistakes secrets for knowledge is like a man who, seeking light, hugs a candle so closely that he smothers it and burns his hand.”


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#11
Quote by dspellman

Baritone (B E A D F# B). This tuning is popular with a variety of hard rock and metal bands, from the Foo Fighters to Carcass.


What Foos song is in B tuning?


Oh and just buy used you can get an ec-1000 for around 500 @ GC although dropping one string down a step shouldnt be a huge deal but for any other tuning id have other guitars