#1
I just bought an all tube amp with an effects send and return for the first time. As of now I'm not using it because I need another cable to plug my guitar if I do. My question is are there any advantages to using the FX send/return ports as opposed to just chaining it in with your guitar input?
#2
Some effects like modulation (chorus, flanger, phaser etc) and time based effects (delays and reverbs) will sound better in the FX loop, coming after your amps pre-amp gain stages. It's always best to experiment but that's the rule of thumb.
"Air created the greenness. And once you've got something, that leads to otherness." - Karl Pilkington.
#3
^ yeah. depending on what effects you're using they may well be far better in front of the amp. or if you're running the amp clean, again there's no point/advantage in using the loop.
I'm an idiot and I accidentally clicked the "Remove all subscriptions" button. If it seems like I'm ignoring you, I'm not, I'm just no longer subscribed to the thread. If you quote me or do the @user thing at me, hopefully it'll notify me through my notifications and I'll get back to you.
Quote by K33nbl4d3
I'll have to put the Classic T models on my to-try list. Shame the finish options there are Anachronism Gold, Nuclear Waste and Aged Clown, because in principle the plaintop is right up my alley.

Quote by K33nbl4d3
Presumably because the CCF (Combined Corksniffing Forces) of MLP and Gibson forums would rise up against them, plunging the land into war.

Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Et tu, br00tz?
#4
Quote by Lavatain
Some effects like modulation (chorus, flanger, phaser etc) and time based effects (delays and reverbs) will sound better in the FX loop, coming after your amps pre-amp gain stages. It's always best to experiment but that's the rule of thumb.
Some people prefer things like phaser and flanger out front because it affects the way the amp distorts.

Things like delay and reverb are the main things that benefit from being in the loop because the repeats have progressively less amplitude. Less amplitude into the preamp means less distortion. If you put delay (I picked delay because it's more obvious) in the loop then it is after where the distortion is made so every repeat has the same amount of distortion. Out front each repeat has progressively less distortion. Which is preferable depends on the application.

They actually came into existence in the 80's because people were starting to use studio rack effects units on guitar rigs and they needed a hotter signal than a guitar produces in order to drive the unit. Since then people have discovered that there are other advantages, as I described above.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band
#5
correct. my delay, tremolo etc do not sound very clear running into the front.
Carvin CT624
Walden G630ce Acoustic
Carvin V3M, Avatar 2x12 WGS Reaper, vet 30
(crybaby, Fairfield circuitry Comp, GFS tuner, Vick Audio 73 Ram's Head, Xotic AC booster, lovepedal trem, TC Flashback, PGS Trinity Reverb, Walrus Audio Aetos power)
#6
basically, if you want your modulation to have more fidelity, chuck it in the loop. that's where a lot of my mod goes, such as chorus, flanger, tremolo, and rotary. however, i prefer some mod such as phaser and vibe before distortion. gives it more of a chewy, throbbing sound.