#1
not very often do i just post stuff like this, but i saw it and though "dammit....thats friggin awesome. it makes so much sense."

http://www.planetwaves.com/american_stage.page#reservePrettyPhoto/1/

i like that plug idea. think it makes a difference? it must. we all overlook stuff like do our cables actually make a solid connection in the jack. heck, no pedals or anything saves you if signal cant even get out of the guitar.
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#2
I guess since I stopped buying ultra-cheap cables (which was many years ago), I've never had issues with my cable ends, it usually ends up being an issue with the input jack. And even then, that's usually on cheap guitars. Cool idea, but it doesn't seem like something incredibly necessary.
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#6
well true. the jack needs to be good regardless.

but the genius in the design is that...all plugs should just be this way. it just makes sense. and mot of the time, who knows what type of ccrap a 1/4 cable can go into. its about getting a good connection in anything, not just a top of the line guitar.
Carvin CT624
Walden G630ce Acoustic
Carvin V3M, Avatar 2x12 WGS Reaper, vet 30
(crybaby, Fairfield circuitry Comp, GFS tuner, Vick Audio 73 Ram's Head, Xotic AC booster, lovepedal trem, TC Flashback, PGS Trinity Reverb, Walrus Audio Aetos power)
#7
Quote by forsaknazrael
Doesn't this really mean that we should be replacing jacks more? I just tested a few one my own jacks/plugs, and the fit is really nice.

If a jack ever gets that bad, a new style of guitar plug is more of a bandaid on the problem, rather than a cure, no?



It's a weird situation sometimes. I have an older 1950's fender with original electronics. replacing or even touching the solder depreciates the value immensely. My brother has an 1950's broadcaster that still plays, but has jack issues, but we would never dream of replacing it. Same goes for even 60's fenders. Then again, I personally would not be playing those guitars a lot, haha.
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#8
Haha, touch and go situation for things like that, but even a new system like this plug wouldn't help in cases like that.

I had a friend who had problems with his output jack on his guitar. He plays probably 4-8 hours a day, gigs a lot. I opened it up, and found the portion of the jack where the plug contacts to be extremely corroded, making for a poor connection. I wouldn't be surprised if vintage guitars had the exact same issue.
#9
I had to replace a socket just last night because the tip wasn't connecting when all the way in. Had I been using those plugs I probably wouldn't have noticed. That's both good and bad. If all your cables are like that, you're laughing. However if a socket is out of spec you may never know about it until you're at a gig using a foreign cable.
All plugs should be made that way imo. It should become the international standard.
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#11
Ah snap. Gonna get dem Robben Ford toanz.
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#13
Quote by darkwolf291
To get dem Robben Ford toanz, your jack needs to be 3/100th's of an inch shorter than your plug

7/200ths of an inch gives you more headroom, noobsickle.
#14
Quote by Reincaster
It's a weird situation sometimes. I have an older 1950's fender with original electronics. replacing or even touching the solder depreciates the value immensely. My brother has an 1950's broadcaster that still plays, but has jack issues, but we would never dream of replacing it. Same goes for even 60's fenders. Then again, I personally would not be playing those guitars a lot, haha.


Man, that would suck. I'd wanna play it.

How big a depreciation could that cause?
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#16
Quote by Reincaster
It's a weird situation sometimes. I have an older 1950's fender with original electronics. replacing or even touching the solder depreciates the value immensely. My brother has an 1950's broadcaster that still plays, but has jack issues, but we would never dream of replacing it. Same goes for even 60's fenders. Then again, I personally would not be playing those guitars a lot, haha.
There's no reason you couldn't replace the jack. Just keep the old one for if you ever go to sell it. Jacks are a consumable item anyway. New tyres don't reduce the price of a vintage car.
Gilchrist custom
Yamaha SBG500
Telecasters
Randall RM100 & RM20
Marshall JTM45 clone
Marshall JCM900 4102 (modded)
Marshall 18W clone
Fender 5F1 Champ clone
Atomic Amplifire
Marshall 1960A
Boss GT-100


Cathbard Amplification
My band