Izayick
Registered User
Join date: Dec 2010
111 IQ
#1
I'm looking for a guitar that satisfies my desire for Les Paul tone, but also has a double locking tremolo. The Alex Lifeson signature Les Paul is a tad out of my price range, so I thought I'd look for a more economical solution. It doesn't necessarily have to be a Les Paul. I just want to dive bomb on something that has Gibson-Like tone. Anyone have any suggestions for a direction I could head with this predicament?

[Edit]
As far as price range goes, I think I'd be willing to go up to about $1500. I'd actually probably want it to be more expensive. Cheap Floyds aren't worth the buy.
Last edited by Izayick at May 19, 2013,
ltdguy27
Doodly Doo
Join date: Aug 2011
269 IQ
#2
Here's an LTD Ec-1000 with a floyd http://www.espguitars.com/guitars/ltd-guitar/ec-1000fr.html
Only thing is the EMGs aren't exactly "Gibson" tone but they can be swapped out .
It would help more if we knew your exact price range maybe we could find more options that way.
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dannyalcatraz
Black Cherry Jello
Join date: Dec 2008
3,265 IQ
#3
I know there are LP-style guitars out there with all kinds of trems, plus some that don't quite look like an LP that likewise may fit your needs.

So tell us, what's your budget like, new or used, location...
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Robbgnarly
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#4
Look at the new Gibson LP Studio Shred. It has a FR
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RedJamaX
Registered User
Join date: Apr 2008
478 IQ
#5
Also,

If you're on a bit of a tighter budget, you may want to check out the Epiphone Prophecy series... look for the FX models, the "F" indicates a Floyd Rose. I have not owned one of these, but I tested one and it definitely seemed up to par for the price range. They are supposed to be one of the best Epiphone models available.
dimarzio77
BAMF
Join date: Oct 2008
145 IQ
#6
I had an ESP LTD KH-203. It was a really decent guitar that played a lot like my Gibson LP Studio but with a FR. The KH-603, I believe, has a neck-through but mine had a bolt on(which I feel was way more forgiving than my Gibson's neck) http://www.musiciansfriend.com/guitars/esp-ltd-kh-203-kirk-hammett-signature-guitar

Then there is the Epiphone Les Paul Pro FX that is also out of production but many stores have new/old stock still available.
dspellman
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2012
1,110 IQ
#7
Quote by Robbgnarly
Look at the new Gibson LP Studio Shred. It has a FR


Yup -- the Gibson Studio Shred is close to your budget; about $1599.



It has a 50's neck (fairly thick), 12" radius plastic (Richlite) fretboard, medium (or medium jumbo?) frets, plastic inlays, real Floyd Rose, no binding. Weight-relieved body.

I have an Agile AL-3100 Floyd.



These have a licensed Floyd that came off the same Korean production line as the Shred's. Slightly slimmer neck, 14" radius real ebony fretboard, jumbo frets, real MOP inlays, triple binding on headstock and body, single binding on the fretboard, about $399.
Some of these models actually have 24 frets (the scale is the same, the necks are about 3/4" longer and the bridge and bridge pickup move about 3/4" toward the neck pickup. These are solid-body guitars; dense and heavy.

This same brand also has the AL-3200 available in a "semi-custom" form. The AL-3200 is a neck-through guitar that looks the same in the front, but has a shaved neck heel like the Axcess and a deep tummy cut in the back. www.rondomusic.com (look for custom guitars)



They are available with such options as a Floyd Rose, stainless frets, full 3/4" figured maple cap, three different neck profiles, locking tuners, real MOP or abalone inlays (several styles), chambered or solid body, a wide range of finishes, several pickup choices, several scale choices (including 25.5" and 27" 24-fret necks), etc. You'll spend a bit over $1000 for a fully optioned version.

And finally, look at the Carvin CS4, CS5 and CS6, all of which are available with Floyd Rose trems, several kinds of fretboard materials (no plastic, sorry), several fret options and a whole host of other choices. Some of these guitars are 24 fret, but all are 25" scale.

I have four LP-style guitars at the moment with Floyds (one an Axcess). I've replaced the OFRs that came on two of them with Gotohs and larger brass sustain blocks. I've also had the frets superglued and PLEK'd, and the guitars set up for low action. That works best for me. I have several more guitars with cheapo licensed Floyds (Korean), one of which dates to 1992 (a Samick) and while I've maintained them, I've had no issues with them at all.
dannyalcatraz
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#8
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Tom 1.0
Hot For Teacher
Join date: Jun 2007
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#9
ESP Eclipse II FR



Get them used well within your budget and come with the best trem, Original FR and impeccable build quality.
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dspellman
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2012
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#10
Quote by Izayick

[Edit]
I'd actually probably want it to be more expensive. Cheap Floyds aren't worth the buy.


FWIW; the patent ran out on the Floyd Rose trem. There's more than one OFR (original) and Floyd itself is making a lower-end trem to, essentially, compete on price with the OFR. You'll have to decide what you want.

The OFR as supplied to Gibson, Fender and the other major builders, even on $4K and up guitars, comes from one of two Korean production lines that also build what used to be referred to as "licensed" Floyd Rose. In this particular case, the "licensed" version is identical to the "original" branded version, and will appear on guitars down to the $375 range.

There is also the Schaller "original" German-made version, and these go to boutique builders and into bubble packs as aftermarket purchase items. There's also the Gotoh German-made non-Floyd-Branded that may be the best of them. Some of the higher-end boutique companies have moved to these (Suhr may be among them).

The cheaper Floyds aren't what they used to be; the whole "licensed" thing added to the cost (accounting for, in some cases, half the cost of the trem). Now companies that sold trems at $50 are no longer selling you a $25 with a $25 license; they can sell a $50 trem for the same money. Korean versions in particular seem to be very high quality at much lower prices. Saddles hold strings better, knife edges don't need maintenance every 30 days <G>.

The upshot of this is that you may find that the cheaper Floyds work every bit as well as (and for pretty much as long as) what used to be the high-priced spread. I've got one LFR on a Samick from 1992 for which I purchased an OFR replacement long ago that sits on the shelf. Thing is, the original on the Samick is still outstanding, and refuses to give me a reason to replace it.

On the other end of the stick, I've got two guitars from which I've shaken out whatever came as original, replaced it with a Gotoh and an aftermarket larger brass sustain block, and I'm tickled with the results. YMMV.

And finally, you may find that you like the sound of a full-thickness SOLID body guitar with a Floyd better than you do the sound of a chambered body guitar with a Floyd.
Last edited by dspellman at May 20, 2013,
Tom 1.0
Hot For Teacher
Join date: Jun 2007
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#11
Just because they drop the "licensed" from the name doesnt mean the Trems suddenly got better.

Yes some versions of the MIK FR is similar in performance to the OFR, other versions of the other Floyd Rose rose branded FRs are crap.

The Gotoh or Schaller versions are still the best versions of the FR, with stuff like the Original Edge being on a par too.

I have yet to play a MIK or similar cheaper Floyd that react the same as the more expensive versions and for me thats where the difference lies.


Now companies that sold trems at $50 are no longer selling you a $25 with a $25 license; they can sell a $50 trem for the same money.


Dont be a moron, they are still selling you a $25 trem for the same, they just make even more money as they dont need to pay the fees on the patent.
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Last edited by Tom 1.0 at May 20, 2013,
T00DEEPBLUE
Boba FRETT
Join date: Oct 2010
2,245 IQ
#12
Quote by Tom 1.0
ESP Eclipse II FR



Get them used well within your budget and come with the best trem, Original FR and impeccable build quality.

I usually dislike ESP's because i dislike their reputation of copying absolutely everyone else, but that guitar looks utterly kickass.
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dspellman
Registered User
Join date: Jan 2012
1,110 IQ
#13
Quote by Tom 1.0


Yes some versions of the MIK FR is similar in performance to the OFR, other versions of the other Floyd Rose rose branded FRs are crap.


As always.



I have yet to play a MIK or similar cheaper Floyd that react the same as the more expensive versions and for me thats where the difference lies.


I've got a few cheapos that react the same as the more expensive versions. Flutter and everything. Generally, if the knife edges are clean, that's not much of an issue, and you can tweak the sprung weight with the various sustain blocks that are available here and there on the market. The main difference for me has been the quality of the materials at the knife edges and the tolerances of the saddles and lock nuts. Getting a saddle that won't hold the string, for example, is just a major PIA no matter how the Floyd "reacts."


Dont be a moron, they are still selling you a $25 trem for the same, they just make even more money as they dont need to pay the fees on the patent.


This particular moron works in marketing. I'm already aware of exactly what's happened with some of these companies firsthand. Keeping the price the same leaves you vulnerable to the competitor that knows full well what you're both paying for the same piece, because he can drop his price, make the same profit he's always made and eat your lunch at the same time. Prices have already gone down on some of the non-FR branded trems, though perhaps not quite as much as the total amount of licensing fee reduction.
HowlerMonkey
Registered User
Join date: Mar 2012
21 IQ
#14
For me, what makes a les paul is not having a huge hole through the guitar near the bridge and the "huger" hole in the back.

If someone has designed a les paul with these features and figured how to make it still act and sound like a les paul.....then they deserve to sell a lot of guitars.

I would think you would need the minimal routing required to clear the parts and a very heavy block on the tremolo.

It can be done but I haven't yet seen anybody go the full distance required to get the best of both worlds.

I'll give it a shot, someday.
Dudage
West Coast Islander
Join date: Jan 2006
543 IQ
#15
You could always get a custom Carvin CS24 (24 fret LP shape, I actually prefer it in all ways to the GLP) with a Floyd and a finish that Gibson could never hope to offer for around $1400 plus shipping. Made in USA to your specifications. Hard to beat that.
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MrFlibble
Puts a bangin' donk on it
Join date: Apr 2008
4,127 IQ
#16
Just be aware that you can't get "Les Paul tone" with a Floyd. A Floyd dominates a guitar's tone. The typical Les Paul tone comes from everything being so solid and having so much mass; Floyd takes that away at the most critical point.

An LP with a recessed, double-locking vibrato will sound a lot thinner, brighter, strings will sound more separated when playing two or more together and you're going to lose sustain.

This is precisely why I gave up on Floyds, actually. Always thought I wanted an LP with a Floyd, but after trying every variation on the market, none of them gave me even remotely the sound I wanted so I said to hell with it and settled on hardtails forever.

Not saying any of the guitars mentioned so far are bad guitars (though there's really no point getting the Agile or Epiphone versions if you can afford things like Gibsons and ESPs), just that you need to bear in mind that some of the things you're after directly clash with each other and you're going to be compromising somewhere along the line.
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