#1
Unless you're a huge band is it a waste to record at a nice studio? We have about 1.2k likes on fb and were interesting in recording our 2nd ep at a nice studio. It is 5 songs. The total cost was between 6k-7k$ With mixing etc for 10 days. (I dont think it would take 10 days to record it, we did 3 in one day once and they were quality takes) Is it worth it?

Also is paying for facebook promotion on posts and for your page cheating?
Lastly, how many hours are considered a day in recording?
#2
Quote by hahaha15
Unless you're a huge band is it a waste to record at a nice studio?

Define nice?

Quote by hahaha15

We have about 1.2k likes on fb

That honestly tells us nothing about your band. Some bands have thousands of facebook likes and still can't draw a crowd. The "bigness" of your band isn't defined by it's facebook likes.

Quote by hahaha15
were interesting in recording our 2nd ep at a nice studio. It is 5 songs. The total cost was between 6k-7k$ With mixing etc for 10 days.


Can you justify the expense? If you have to ask then I'd probably say you can't.
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#3
For an EP? Yes. You are better off finding someone that records bands on the cheap (Ask around, lots of people that are in bands record on the side).

You made a thread about Facebook promotion in the Pit not long ago, and the question is as stupid now as it was then. NO, it is NOT "cheating", if you feel you have to pay someone to promote your band via Facebook then go for it, nobody else will care.

As for studio time, it would depend on the studio and engineer. Some places treat it as a 9-5 thing and others let you go as long as you need, within reason.

Just a warning, people have been stung before when it comes to recording. I can't remember his name but a guy that runs a "label" has repeatedly conned people out of their money, not just small bands either, he screwed over Mendeed and they were forced to split up. Make sure, before you hand over that much cash, you get a contract, read it, get someone outside of the band (ie a lawyer) to read it, and be cautious.
#4
It depends on the purpose of the EP. Is it supposed to be something sold in stores? then you NEED it done professionally. If it's just to give away/sell at gigs then you could probably track it somewhere and then mix it yourself (if you have the skills) or post it here or one some other recording forum, you'll likely find someone who's willing to mix it for you in exchange for being able to use it as a showcase of their mixing skills (which also get's you a little free hosting on their site/soundcloud/whatever). If it's just a demo for venues then you could get away with a line from the mixer if you're all going through the PA, or a well placed microphone somewhere.
#5
If your band's tight enough you'll need nowhere near those 10 days.
I just laid down a 5 song EP (plus mixing/mastering) for $1250, took 4 days cause our singer can't stand any take he lays down. But dude, throwing down that much on an EP is unnecessary. Usually you can find a studio that'll do it well cheap.
This was the result
#6
Total overkill for an EP. That kind of budget should really be left for labels, unless you've got a serious fanbase and are confident of sales.

Not to start getting egotistical but the location demos I do for bands round here for under £100 sometimes turn out as good as local pro studios charging three times the amount. It's not that I have 'golden ears' or world class equipment, it's just a case of understanding the bands' needs and putting in a bit of extra effort to get the best results. A little bit of mix referencing can go a long way....


It's not about the gear - or the overall ability of the engineer in some cases - it's all about finding someone who understands your music and knows how to make it sound great.

Never pay for gear - pay for people.


Incidentally, round here you can easily get a 4 track EP done for around £800 in a pro studio. And by 'pro' I mean a world-class studio and an engineer with previous clients even your grandma will have heard of. The idea of spending 7k on an EP is just ludicrous.

me_llamo_juan: Sounds superb, great results. Ska can be a real mixing challenge since it's so ****ing nuts Don't be afraid to give a plug to the studio and engineers involved!
Last edited by kyle62 at May 21, 2013,
#7
maybe check your price with other options first but after that

Life an adventure Dude Go For it !!
Experiences the best and then you'll learn afew things and maybe get better prospective on things
1/ you'll get a good recording
2/ you'll connect with a local Pro studio
3/ you'll get to produce something you can be proud of ( without second thought's )
4/ you'll get to see how things should be done and you'll know for next time

AND you'll always have that memory of Recording in a High level studio,. if you don't, you won't.
Last edited by T4D at May 21, 2013,
#9
Wow... talk about someone staring at your bank account.

Why not take that $6 to $7k and buy your own recording equipment. Record all you want and then some.

Its been a while since I've priced recording equipment, but you should get enough decent gear for that amount of cash.

After that you've got the "learing curve" of getting the sounds right and the software you've chosen to get it recorded.

That's exactly what I did. I was tired of spending my cash on studio time and built my own.

Food for thought!
#10
Quote by Bill43
Wow... talk about someone staring at your bank account.

Why not take that $6 to $7k and buy your own recording equipment. Record all you want and then some.

Its been a while since I've priced recording equipment, but you should get enough decent gear for that amount of cash.

After that you've got the "learing curve" of getting the sounds right and the software you've chosen to get it recorded.

That's exactly what I did. I was tired of spending my cash on studio time and built my own.

Food for thought!

Because it takes a long time to get even close to pro quality. Check out anything on my soundcloud here, that's after about two years and it's not even close. If you were to go to Marianas Curse that's 3 years that I know of (it's a friend of mine) and very good equipment. That's a fair bit better but still not quite there. It's the person not the equipment, and without years of experience the TS wouldn't have much luck with the best equipment in the world.
#12
If you're doing a 5 song EP, it shouldn't cost more than $1,000 tops, especially since you are an unknown band. Lets talk business for a second:

You spent $6500ish on recording a 5 song EP. That means, at $1 a song, you're going to need to sell 1300 EPs at $5 an EP in order to make your $6500 investment back.

Now, lets say you want to sell physical copies at shows. In order to get 1500 CDs in Jewel Cases from Disc Makers, thats another $1500 bringing your investment up to $8000 which mean you need to sell 1600 EPs at $5 a piece to make your money back. Yes, there is the digital market as well but most local bands I know still press CDs as its easier to sell a CD at a show than to get someone to buy your tracks of iTunes/Band Camp hours later (if they still remember who you are).

Now you mentioned promotion. A good advertising campaign is going to require some serious cash to get going. I'm not sure if any of these websites where you can pay people to market your music really work but I hear it takes $2,000-$5,000 to run a successful ad campaign (obviously, you can do it for less but this is what I've seen some sites charge that "guarantee" results). This brings your total investment to $10k-$13k meaning you need to sell over 2,000-2600 CDs in order to start seeing a return on your investment. Even then, I'm scratching the surface of how much it costs for an EP

Now, if you could get all of your 1.2k Facebook likes to buy your EP, this is no problem as you'll make most of your money back right away. But, Likes don't equal $$$. Honestly, Likes aren't worth shit on Facebook unless people are engaging with your posts. If 1.2k people like your page and only 5 ever see your statuses and like/comment on them, you've got a lot of fake likes that are just there for fluffing.

Not to completely dash your hopes & dreams but as a business decision, $6k-$7k on an EP for an unknown band is a terrible investment.

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#13
Absolutely a waste IMO.

I have friends who did this same thing. $4k for tracking, $3k for mixing, plus however much for mastering and replication, for a 5-song EP. The results were pretty good, but nothing mind-blowing. Since then, they've bought all their own recording equipment to do it themselves and have it mixed by someone else (which really didn't make sense, since they opted to get the most expensive Macbook Pro money could buy, expensive monitors, preamps, mics, an electric drumset, Superior 2.0, etc. so they really didn't save any money at all). I would have expected to pay maybe $2k for what they received on the EP, the scary part is, they keep using the same guy to mix their newer stuff, and the results on the latest single were pretty saddening to say the least.

There are plenty of great producers out there with the skills to deliver a great sounding record for A LOT cheaper. I think the misconception is that the higher the price, the better the results. That's not really the case - The reason these guys charge so much is because they mainly work with bands who have record labels that can afford to pay the big bucks; the band themselves have to pay very little out of pocket, if anything at all. They jack up the prices for independent bands, because they know people will pay it to be mixed by a major label engineer/producer, and to them, it's not worth it to work at competitive rates, if they're not going to be listed on the back of an album that sells 100,000+ copies.

Bands seem to be scared to record with anyone who doesn't have a dedicated facility, because they think commercial studio = professional sound. While that may be true in many cases, the days of needing to run into a $300,000 Neve board with hundreds of thousands of dollars of outboard gear are really no more. Look at all the big name studios who are closing now because of where technology has taken us. The fact is, if you know what you're doing, you can release a pro-quality record with a Line 6 UX2 and a pair of KRK Rokits. Hell, Sturgis was getting paid a ton to mix on a similar setup, and still doesn't have the greatest of gear. As much as people like to rag on Sturgis's sound, his mixes aren't BAD, and he practically single-handedly invented the sound of -core bands over the past few years.
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#14
With 7k $ you can buy most of the gear you could possibly need to record all of your future albums. And on your own pace. You won't buy the mixing skills though so you need to study but I think it's worth the effort. You might even like it and find a new hobby.

But to be honest that sounds TOO much for 5 songs.
Last edited by Sethis at May 21, 2013,
#15
if youve got 10 studio days and the guy takes 3 or 4 days to mix it, your are paying someone about $500 per day. i know i wouldnt pay anyone that much if i was just doing an EP with a fairly small local band. unless you are drawing a decently large crowd at your shows, you probably wont make enough to cover $6k in recording costs.