#1
I just bought some d'addario 10's to put on my strat after having it a good few month and never changing strings.
So I changed the strings over (did a pretty poor job of winding it around at the top)
But after getting tuned up, I noticed a hellllllllla lot of fret buzz, I had a very small amount in spots before, but It's almost un playable as it is.
I did change from the standard 9's that came on it to 10's, and i've heard this can cause problems, But at the same time, I've never had new strings on this guitar, Is this something that might wear away after a good few hours playing? Or is it something more serious?
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#2
I get some fret buzz pretty often when I change my strings, maybe not to the extent you describe, but it always goes away. Also, I use either 11's or 12's, so maybe it's related to gauge to an extent. I'll usually just jam on them awhile to break them in and make it go away.
#3
Quote by Caaarrl94
I just bought some d'addario 10's to put on my strat after having it a good few month and never changing strings.
So I changed the strings over (did a pretty poor job of winding it around at the top)
But after getting tuned up, I noticed a hellllllllla lot of fret buzz, I had a very small amount in spots before, but It's almost un playable as it is.
I did change from the standard 9's that came on it to 10's, and i've heard this can cause problems, But at the same time, I've never had new strings on this guitar, Is this something that might wear away after a good few hours playing? Or is it something more serious?



That will cause buzz for sure.
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#4
Quote by Caaarrl94
I just bought some d'addario 10's to put on my strat after having it a good few month and never changing strings.
So I changed the strings over (did a pretty poor job of winding it around at the top)
But after getting tuned up, I noticed a hellllllllla lot of fret buzz, I had a very small amount in spots before, but It's almost un playable as it is.
I did change from the standard 9's that came on it to 10's, and i've heard this can cause problems, But at the same time, I've never had new strings on this guitar, Is this something that might wear away after a good few hours playing? Or is it something more serious?


It could be the new strings. It also definitely is the change in string gauge.

But it's also what H4T3BR33D3R stated.
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#5
If I had a penny for every time someone complained of "fret" buzz from new strings. You either left the guitar too long without any string on it with tension on the truss rod, causing a back bow. Or you just haven't become accustom to the sound of new strings (maybe on in terms of this instrument, you might've changed strings a few times on old guitars).
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#6
Also, going from 9s to 10s will affect the string radius (the strings are slightly thicker now) and will add some tension to the neck as well. Make sure the string radius matches the neck radius, and make sure the neck has the proper amount of relief. Check your action too.

In other words, set up the guitar.
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This is terrible advice. Even worse than the useless dry, sarcastic comment I made.

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#7
Quote by Lavatain
If I had a penny for every time someone complained of "fret" buzz from new strings. You either left the guitar too long without any string on it with tension on the truss rod, causing a back bow.
Too long would be like 10 years, I've shipped quite a few Stratocaster necks without adjusting the truss rod from when it was taken off.
Quote by stonyman65
Also, going from 9s to 10s will affect the string radius (the strings are slightly thicker now) and will add some tension to the neck as well. Make sure the string radius matches the neck radius, and make sure the neck has the proper amount of relief. Check your action too.

In other words, set up the guitar.
wut? String radius?

Caaarrl94, depending on your bridge you might have thrown the action off a bit when you changed strings. Easy to do on a TOM-style. Raise the action a bit and it should cure it.

You went 9's -> 10's, which would cause the neck to bow away from the strings. That shouldn't cause any fret buzz. It will probably go away on its own. Raise your action a bit if it doesn't and that should cure it.
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#8
Quote by Flux'D
Too long would be like 10 years, I've shipped quite a few Stratocaster necks without adjusting the truss rod from when it was taken off.wut? String radius?

Caaarrl94, depending on your bridge you might have thrown the action off a bit when you changed strings. Easy to do on a TOM-style. Raise the action a bit and it should cure it.

You went 9's -> 10's, which would cause the neck to bow away from the strings. That shouldn't cause any fret buzz. It will probably go away on its own. Raise your action a bit if it doesn't and that should cure it.


The arc of the strings in relation to the curvature of the fretboard. You don't just have the strings flat - they need to be arched slightly so you can bend and not intersect with the fretboard. The flatter the fretboard radius, the flatter the strings can be.

If your guitar is something like, say, a Fender with a 9.5 inch radius, the arc of the strings is going to have to be rounder than say, something like and Ibanez with a flatter 16 inch radius.
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This is terrible advice. Even worse than the useless dry, sarcastic comment I made.

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I'm too old for the Jim Morrison look now. When I was gigging I had a fine arse.
#9
Quote by Caaarrl94
I just bought some d'addario 10's to put on my strat after having it a good few month and never changing strings.
So I changed the strings over (did a pretty poor job of winding it around at the top)
But after getting tuned up, I noticed a hellllllllla lot of fret buzz, I had a very small amount in spots before, but It's almost un playable as it is.
I did change from the standard 9's that came on it to 10's, and i've heard this can cause problems, But at the same time, I've never had new strings on this guitar, Is this something that might wear away after a good few hours playing? Or is it something more serious?

Did you make any adjustments besides changing the strings? Is the buzz closer to the nut end or the bridge?

Generally speaking, going to a heavier guage should decrease all factors of buzz. They vibrate in a tighter oscillation due to the higher tension, and the higher tension would also increase neck relief, reducing chance of buzz in the lower frets. Also, unless you have the bridge decked, that would have raised, raising action as well. Any of the effects would have reduced buzz to my mind.

Chances are, after 'months' your old strings were so dead, you are just hearing more of your strings and are not used to it. Give it a day or a week to 'let the treble wear off' heheh.

That all said, I find the brand of strings can also be a factor. I normally use D'Addarrio 10's, and tried an Ernie Ball slinky set and they buzzed a lot more than the D'Ads. I tried Elixers, and found I could get lower action without buzz (but they broke a lot).

If you are going to stick with 10's you should probably get it set up for 10's anyway. You'll likely have some intonation to do after you first adjust relief, then action.

The comments regarding radius are also true (although changing the strings with no other adjustments should not have affected it). Maybe try it out as is for a bit and see if you like the gauge. if so, get set up for it.

Just my 2 cents
Last edited by Razbo at May 23, 2013,
#10
New strings vibrate better than old strings. It should die down within about 3-5 days (or you become used to it). If not, I'd check the string/fret height. Most of the times bigger strings reduce fret buzz but occasionally the string itself being bigger, is what causes the buzz.
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