#1
Hi.

I have been using Live Lite since December, and have done pretty well with it. I find it easy to use and like the Impulse feature.

But it has its limitations. 8 tracks, 6 effects, 4 plugs.

I feel I have made good use of those, and in some cases have found that is all I need. But not in all cases.

I have a chance to get a Live 8 upgrade from Lite with a free upgrade to Live 9 for £159. Big savings. But still a lot of money to me.

That is where the slightly concern comes in. I know of Reaper. The much much cheaper alternative. I used it years ago but only for recording some guitar. That puts a competition on this.

The catch is, the Live deal lasts until midnight, and I only discovered it today.

My music usually consists of guitar, bass, drums and vocals. The drums are programmed. I use a combination of mic'ed amps and amplitube and will occasionally stick in another midi instrument. I like things to sound quite rustic, but still professional.

What do you guys think?
#2
Personally, if you know how to use Live I would stick with it, it's mostly geared towards EDM production but that doesn't mean you can't record live instruments into it because you can, and just as good as someone using another DAW such as Reaper.

I think that if you switched to Reaper it would be quite a big learning curve, most people say it's intuitive and I agree but it's quite different to what you'll be used to in Live.

Having said that, Reaper is very cheap and you would be saving yourself some money, which you could use for plug ins and such if you wanted. It all comes down to personal preference and workflow, try the Reaper trial and see how you get on with it, if you prefer Live, get the upgrade, if you prefer Reaper get Reaper.
#3
Good response. It is an hour and a half till midnight here and I am falling asleep. The guy I spoke to said the shop may keep some after today to still sell at this price so it should still be ok by morning if I sleep on it. Hopefully.

How easy is to transfer an already recorded project to a new DAW?
#4
Pretty easy, some let you save as .omf files which will open up in other DAWs, I don't believe you can with Reaper and Live though, so you'd have to consolidate all the files then import them into the DAW you want to transfer them to.
#5
Quote by dannycasevnx
Pretty easy, some let you save as .omf files which will open up in other DAWs, I don't believe you can with Reaper and Live though, so you'd have to consolidate all the files then import them into the DAW you want to transfer them to.

Ablrton can only export wave.

Can it be as simple as exporting and importing the files as waves from the one to the other?
#6
Yeah that's what I mean but if there isn't some form of consolidate function then you'll have to make sure that every file starts at the same time. Then just export them from Ableton into a folder somewhere, open Reaper and import them in, making sure that the sample rate and bit depth is the same in your new session.
#8
Recording "real" instruments works fine in Ableton and Ableton handles MIDI like no other. Programming drums works like a charm and if you even consider doing anything with backing tracks or live sampling or something it's the way to go.
But 8 tracks, 6 effects and 4 plug-ins is WAY too little for me to work with. Are you sure it's enough for you to work with?

But if everything works as you want it to with Reaper and you're not planning on doing anything else than there is no reason in changing.
#9
I am a Suite 9 owner, and have used it for years. I've never made EDM once in my life. I do all organic production, definitely some sampled drums and keys (which Live handles brilliantly). The drum racks are a great plugin to have access to, as well as the Glue Compressor.

The audio/rhythm/harmony to midi feature is an insane time saving composition tool. We regularly sing melodies into it, then lay midi keys/etc onto the melody. I've also read off of the piano roll to learn guitar riffs that someone sings to me. It's awesome!

I HIGHLY recomend making the upgrade, especially if you're getting a discount.

Quote by jkielq91

My music usually consists of guitar, bass, drums and vocals. The drums are programmed. I use a combination of mic'ed amps and amplitube and will occasionally stick in another midi instrument. I like things to sound quite rustic, but still professional.


This is EXACTLY how I approach recording. Here's an example of what I did recently in Live, midi keys and drums, DI bass and obviously real vocals. No guitar in this one, but I will have more clips soon with guitar.
https://soundcloud.com/lavenderlane/sun-in-an-empty-room
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
Last edited by Sid McCall at May 22, 2013,
#10
Quote by Sid McCall
I am a Suite 9 owner, and have used it for years. I've never made EDM once in my life. I do all organic production, definitely some sampled drums and keys (which Live handles brilliantly). The drum racks are a great plugin to have access to, as well as the Glue Compressor.

The audio/rhythm/harmony to midi feature is an insane time saving composition tool. We regularly sing melodies into it, then lay midi keys/etc onto the melody. I've also read off of the piano roll to learn guitar riffs that someone sings to me. It's awesome!

I HIGHLY recomend making the upgrade, especially if you're getting a discount.


This is EXACTLY how I approach recording. Here's an example of what I did recently in Live, midi keys and drums, DI bass and obviously real vocals. No guitar in this one, but I will have more clips soon with guitar.
https://soundcloud.com/lavenderlane/sun-in-an-empty-room

This sounds good. Was every thing used build in? like reverb etc? or plugins?

My style of music is more rock n roll.

and yes, 8 tracks, 6 effects and 4 plugs is to little.

I can do any eq, compression or reverb to drums (though they still sound pretty good). Once I have mixed the vocals I am out of tools.
#11
If you like Ableton, then upgrade.

If you have time, download REAPER, give it a play with, see what you think so you're making an informed decision.

But to me, an upgrade at this time would be a no brainer.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



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#13
Quote by jkielq91
This sounds good. Was every thing used build in? like reverb etc? or plugins?

My style of music is more rock n roll.

and yes, 8 tracks, 6 effects and 4 plugs is to little.

I can do any eq, compression or reverb to drums (though they still sound pretty good). Once I have mixed the vocals I am out of tools.

Most plug-ins on there are from the Waves RennMaxx bundle, I got that on sale for $99 and couldn't pass it up. All reverbs are from a custom Impluse reverb that I buss everything to.

Most of Ableton's included plugins are great, I think you'll find that everything is totally usable. You'll definitely find that there are a bunch you'll never touch, especially if you're rock-focused. There are a ton I've never touched.

Some of my other songs are far more rock-n-roll, and it's very easy to get that sound. Besides, it's just software, it doesn't impose its own tone on your session. Nobody will ever know you used Ableton as opposed to Logic etc unless you tell them.

Glad you went for it, I think you'll find the expanded functionality very exciting! If you have any questions about the program, feel free to PM me, I'm happy to help. I've been using Live for years, and I definitely had a lot of weird questions at first.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite