#1
I have a new custom guitar made by a luthier friend of mine. It is a hybrid strat and it has some special features that make it unique and quite hard to choose the right pickups for it.
It has bridge and neck pickups(Currently Bill Lawrence S1 and S3), with a 250k blend pot.
The body is made of two woods glued in three pieces: bubinga in the core, and ash on top and bottom.
It is set neck, with maple fretboard and it has a lespaul bridge style .

The guitar itself seems to sing more on the bright/treble side but does have some sustain due to its build. I wanted to hear some experienced opinions on how to choose the best pickups for my strat.I like the Hendrix Sound as well as David Gilmour, but I also like some dirtier heavier stuff like heavy psicadelhic rock(Tool/Oceansize/Amplifier)
I use a skreddy lady muff, a low gain germanium fuzzface, through a 50 watt 6l6 valve amp.
The pickups I have at the moment just don't do it for me, the neck is actually ok, it sounds full , bassy and cristal clear, but the bridge souns round and that's it, no crispy highs, no tight lows, it0's just bland.
I want to get nice clear/crispy highs and to recover the unatural bass of the guitar.
What a tstament...!!!! :
#2
By the way, I've been looking into Suhr pickups, Fender Custom Shops and Dimarzios
#3
Err, that's a really interesting choice of woods and setups.

However just addressing the blandness of the bridge, a Bare Knuckle creamic Nailbomb would be very very suitable... but I think it's gonna be too hot for the cleaner sounds, so you might end up tweaking the volume knob a lot.
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#4
Quote by ragingkitty
Err, that's a really interesting choice of woods and setups.

However just addressing the blandness of the bridge, a Bare Knuckle creamic Nailbomb would be very very suitable... but I think it's gonna be too hot for the cleaner sounds, so you might end up tweaking the volume knob a lot.

Isn't that one humbucker?
#5
Oh... For some reason I kept thinking of a humbucker. Lemmie give it a thought.
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it's so cool to hate Gibson, even the federal Department of Justice hates them.

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( . .) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
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#6
I've Been looking into fender custom shop 69.i like the crispy highs and the lows of it.I'm just doubting the quality of these pickups now since the magical woman is no longer tajing Care of its production.
#7
O, anyone?good bridge pickup for northern ashbody strat guitar?maybe lollar special?
#8
You need to be aware that the more a pickup pumps up the bass, the less 'tightness' you're going to get and the more treble—crispness, if you like—will be lost, too. Pickups that are "tight" and "crisp" are pretty much the opposite of pickups that give you fuller bass response.

Also bear in mind that in terms of both tightness and bass, your set up has an awful lot to do with the sound you get. Pickups can only tweak response, they can't override the inherent tone of the guitar and how it is set up. You may find that you need to raise your action a little and use a different construction or even gauge of string in order to get both the tonal balance and response you're after.

That said, Seymour Duncan make a range of hotter single coils that may do what you want. DiMarzio make a few too, but when it comes to Strat-size and Tele-size pickups, I have always found Seymour Duncan to be more impressive (which makes sense when you consider the roots of each company).

The Seymour Duncan Hot Stack gives you a more powerful and slightly smoother sound with sharp attack. It's similar to an original Firebird pickup but in a standard Stratocaster single coil size and with the coils stacked and wired parallel rather than side-by-side and wired series. It's sort of like a colder, more cutting P-90 sound. It will give you more of everything, basically, especially in the bass and lower-mids. It will be quite a drastic shift in sound compared to what you have now, but that may be what you're after. Not the best pick for Hendrix, specifically, but for everything else you mentioned it's a great pickup.

A Vintage Hot Stack Plus is more or less the sound you have right now with more bass. It's probably not going to wow you, but if more low-end response is what you're mostly after, this does the job. This is the safe choice if you don't want to risk going too far from the normal single coil sound.

A Custom Stack Plus is the same as above but with a little more bite to it; the output is pushed up but the EQ balance is spread out more towards the extreme bass and treble, rather than big mids like most hot pickups, so it won't overpower regular single coils. Importantly, this has both more treble and more bass than normal singles. Consider it the next step from the Vintage Hot Stack Plus.

None of the above are to be confused with the Hot Stack Plus, which is all mids and no treble or bass. Yes, SD's naming system is very confusing.

If you're not sold on hum-cancelling single coils (though that is where most bassier, more brash singles reside), try an SD Quarter Pound. Bigger magnetic rods give you a lot more treble and a little more bass. It's quite similar to taking a normal single coil and removing all the volume and tone controls, 'unleashing' it. The downside to this is that with any degree of distortion—especially fuzz as you use—you're going to get even more noise than usual.

Of course there are many small companies that make boutique pickups to order, but if you go down that route then you will A) be paying a premium for only a very slight difference—and not necessarily an improvement—in sound and B) be ordering something custom-wound for you so there's no point suggesting specific modesl or even makers.
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