#1
i want to start recording my band because we have quite a few songs and theyre good enough to invest in. i looked at the prices for studios but i thought it would be better to buy some equipment myself and try to get a decent home recording. i love recording and i have dabbled in it before but on a very small budget.

i was thinking of recording all of the instrument separately for good recordings, and then just be able to record the band as a whole for demos/jam session

we're a bunch of university students so we dotn have a very high budget. however, we also dont want a particularly nice sound in the sense that were an alt rock/punk band and we dont really care for radio quality. rough, raw recording is something we prefer (a lot of our favourite albums werent recorded on amazing equipment)

i was looking online and i was tihnking about buying all of these
http://www.thomann.de/gb/behringer_xenyx_q1202_usb.htm
http://www.thomann.de/gb/the_tbone_sc400popkiller.htm
http://www.thomann.de/gb/the_tbone_em800_stereo_set.htm

3 mics and a USB mixer (we have software already for our computer). as for studio monitors were ok for now. i have quality speakers. the final price with additional stuff is 240 euros

what do you think?
thanks
#2
The one thing you have to remember.


You'll get a way better result from the studio than you will from buying the gear an doing it yourself.

To cost of good entry level gear will still run you a few hundred bucks/euros/pounds + all the time you have to invest to learn how to do it.

If you want to get into recording, do it because you want to learn how to do it, not because you want to record your band for cheap. It's a bad idea.

And anyway, you'll need an interface to record anything. This is what we tend to recomend if you want the best quality/price ratio.

http://www.thomann.de/gb/focusrite_scarlett_2i4.htm

Then you'll need the software (we recomend REAPER, it's $60)

And something to monitor with, ideally a set of monitors... if not a GOOD pair of headphones, which you'll need to have anyway for tracking purposes. Earbuds or a gaming headset won't work.

Even if you're a punk band you'll still need more than just those mics.

And finally, you'd be surprised how difficult it is to make a good sounding "raw" recording. You still need to use passable gear and know what you're doing.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
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Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
Last edited by ChemicalFire at May 24, 2013,
#3
to be honest it is more to learn how to record by myself. fact is re record every time we jam together to keep ideas so a decent sound would be nice.

as for software im using cubase LE4 which i find to be decent considering it cam free with some gear.

would only 2 inputs be enough? bass and guitar they should be fine but im worried about drums
#4
Then you'll need something bigger. Such as

http://www.thomann.de/gb/focusrite_scarlett_18i20.htm

Whilst you don't NEED all 18 inputs... you do need the 8 XLR inputs. Even then there can be issues with actually recording all 8 at once without firewire (though honestly that isn't my area of expertise as I use a drum machine, but there are others around who can help.)
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#5
i mean would 2 inputs be enough when recording separately? i dont plan on doing these as live recordings. if i were to record just drums would 2 be enough?
#6
In theory yes.

They won't sound particularly heavy though. Get a good LDC capturing the whole kit and them a mic on the kick (or snare depending on which one is more important to you) and you'd get something at least usable.

If you're clever you could do some sample replacements too to heavy some parts up. but that'd mean dropping a little more cash on some Trigger software.

THIS: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1o9L7agaluo

Might be useful to you. It's not punk or anything like that. But this guy is a great knowledge on recording (please excuse to cheesy PraiseRock, the guys knowledge is worth looking past that xD) Though remember he has great acoustic treatment, so your recordings won't be quite as punchy.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
Last edited by ChemicalFire at May 24, 2013,
#7
You can record drums with two mics, but don't expect a sound resembling anything "in your face" or modern.

In fact, expect a jazzier, or a 1950's rock sound.

Why? Because with a lot of the earlier rock and jazz recordings, that's how they did them - a couple of mics in a room. That's how they got "that sound."

Modern sounds where you have that "in your face" sound come from putting the mics "in the face" of the drums. This didn't start until the mid-sixties, when George Martin started doing it with the Beatles. Ever since, "everybody" does it that way. Not doing it that way will mean sounding "pre-Beatles." With two mics, you'll only get "in the face" of two drums. It won't cut it for a raw alt/rock/punk kind of sound.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#8
Quote by ChemicalFire
In theory yes.

They won't sound particularly heavy though. Get a good LDC capturing the whole kit and them a mic on the kick (or snare depending on which one is more important to you) and you'd get something at least usable.

If you're clever you could do some sample replacements too to heavy some parts up. but that'd mean dropping a little more cash on some Trigger software.

THIS: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1o9L7agaluo

Might be useful to you. It's not punk or anything like that. But this guy is a great knowledge on recording (please excuse to cheesy PraiseRock, the guys knowledge is worth looking past that xD) Though remember he has great acoustic treatment, so your recordings won't be quite as punchy.


i looked at the video and it seemed really good.

would this be better than the focusrite? ive decided to up my budget a bit and it has two more mic inputs.
#9
Would what be?
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#11
Akai are a pretty good brand, but honestly I don't know anything about that interface specifically.

Though it would let you record overheads, the snare and the kick. You'll have to check out some reviews and stuff.

Though these reviews seem to be positive: http://www.musicradar.com/gear/tech/computers-software/peripherals/input-devices/audio-interfaces/eie-pro-529225

Once you've got that you'll still need mics. You'll need different mics for

Vocals
Guitars
Kick
Snare

Luckily the Snare and Guitar both work perfectly with an SM57. Vocals will be an LDC of some kind... it's only the kick I can't help you with. Bass guitars can just be di'd.
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
Last edited by ChemicalFire at May 25, 2013,
#12
would i be able to use an ldc for the bass drum maybe or else for the overheads? other wise what would you suggest for overheads? (im looking into the bass drum mics)
#13
http://recordinghacks.com/2010/09/07/bass-drum-microphones/ Well this site claims you can.

Overheads are normally a matched pair of pencil condensers such as the Rode NT5's though they're normally pretty pricey. These could be a good compromise, SE do great entry level gear: http://www.thomann.de/gb/se_electronics_se_1a_stereo_set.htm

Some people say that cheap LDC's can make good over heads... but then you'd end up buying 3 LDC's and that could be a little pointless xD
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
Last edited by ChemicalFire at May 25, 2013,
#14
hmm ok thanks for the advice ill see how much i can afford and get the best i can, looking around for 2nd hand stuff
#15
See my edit for an affordable matched pair!
All I want is for everyone to go to hell...
...It's the last place I was seen before I lost myself



Quote by DisarmGoliath
You can be the deputy llamma of the recordings forum!
#18
Quote by toddkreuz
Stay far away from the Behringer stuff!

T

Not even Mr Bandwagon. Behringer recording gear is generally very good bang for buck stuff. Anything you'd want to use an SM58/57 on (that is, snares and guitar amps) could be replaced with a Behringer XM8500 and sound just as good (you just lose the durability, but that's not as important in a recording environment). The C1, C2, and C3 are very good microphones too (C1 and C3 are both good LDCs, the C2s are a matched pair of SDCs) and from the Recording Revolution video we can see that the B1 is also a very good microphone too.

For recording where durability isn't as big an issue (because you really shouldn't be beating up your recording gear) I would actually highly recommend checking out Behringer gear if you want cheap stuff with a good sound.
#19
Quote by chatterbox272
Not even Mr Bandwagon. Behringer recording gear is generally very good bang for buck stuff. Anything you'd want to use an SM58/57 on (that is, snares and guitar amps) could be replaced with a Behringer XM8500 and sound just as good (you just lose the durability, but that's not as important in a recording environment). The C1, C2, and C3 are very good microphones too (C1 and C3 are both good LDCs, the C2s are a matched pair of SDCs) and from the Recording Revolution video we can see that the B1 is also a very good microphone too.

For recording where durability isn't as big an issue (because you really shouldn't be beating up your recording gear) I would actually highly recommend checking out Behringer gear if you want cheap stuff with a good sound.


ok good to know thanks. i usually stay away from behringer for guitar stuff but i wont be stepping on recoridng equipment like i do on my pedals