#1
Hi All,
I don't use my capo but I always see lessons on line that say "Now place your capo on the 4th fret"...etc

Let's say you are playing a 1-4-5 chord progression in the key of G (open chords/no capo)

Like Good Riddance, (aka time of your life) by Green Day

Now say I put a capo on the first fret...and I play the same 1-4-5 progression in the key of G, (G, C, D)........

does that turn it into the key of A?

Then the third fret...key of B?

5th fret...key of C
#2
You're correct that you play the same chords (G,C,D) but placing the capo on the first fret changes the key to Ab (half step up).
Second fret= A
Third fret=Bb
fourth=B
fifth=C
Everything I say can be fully substantiated by my own opinion
#3
Or, like many of us, you can just play the barre chords and skip using the capo.
#5
Quote by KG6_Steven
Or, like many of us, you can just play the barre chords and skip using the capo.



This guy has a point, if you're strumming open chords with a capo it might make more sense just playing barre chords.
However it would be really hard to play things like 'here comes the sun' properly and in the original key without a capo.


Also, you need to learn a bit more about intervals on a guitar, 1 fret = 1 semitone.
Last edited by derek8520 at May 25, 2013,
#6
Capos are there if you want to play open chord voicings but want to play the song in a higher key (because of your singer's vocal range or something). So if you play the 1-4-5 progression with G, C and D shape open chords and have the capo on the first fret, it will be in Ab.
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#7
Quote by KG6_Steven
Or, like many of us, you can just play the barre chords and skip using the capo.


http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LsnFvEQYJPU

i daresay barre chords aren't always an option
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#8
Quote by KG6_Steven
Or, like many of us, you can just play the barre chords and skip using the capo.

This works just fine if you're only playing the chords straight, but if you're tossing in little melodies and like to use drones and the likes you're better off with a capo. (Or just tuning your guitar up like Johnny Marr did back in the day. Of course this will only work for a few semitones and you'd have to adjust the tension of the neck accordingly.)
REGGIE
#9
Quote by KG6_Steven
Or, like many of us, you can just play the barre chords and skip using the capo.
Like the "big boys", huh?

It's odd that I see so many high profile, highly paid, working pros using capos.

But so many, "who the heck is that ", dissing them.

Kinda always makes me laugh.

BTW, you can't even play the entire chord scale in G without using a barre chord anyway. (Bm @ 2nd). Slap a capo on the 2nd fret to make it the key of A, and lo and behold, that pesky C#m @ the 4th fret crops up.
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 26, 2013,
#10
Quote by LeakyFlask
This works just fine if you're only playing the chords straight, but if you're tossing in little melodies and like to use drones and the likes you're better off with a capo....
Capos are also fun for 2 guitar arrangements.

For example:

Guitar 1: key of G (open, G, D, C).

Guitar 2: Capo on 5th fret, plays in D major, (D, G, A)

This broadens the harmony quite a bit.There's a bunch of unison notes happening, and you're also playing two different chord inversions, "at once". (At least so to speak).

A 5 string "Drop D" capo can be fun also. On the second fret, you get, "drop E" tuning.

Obviously anything you can do in drop D will work, but it doesn't change the tuning intervals of the guitar, so all of the normal chord shapes/ fingerings don't change. When you fret the E-6, you still get the expected note, and don't have to compensate as you would with actual drop D tuning.

Best candidate I can think of for this would be The Beatles, "Norwegian Wood". It's recorded in E, but much richer harmonically if you play it in D. So, "Drop E".
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 26, 2013,
#11
Quote by Captaincranky
Capos are also fun for 2 guitar arrangements.

For example:

Guitar 1: key of G (open, G, D, C).

Guitar 2: Capo on 5th fret, plays in D major, (D, G, A)

This broadens the harmony quite a bit.There's a bunch of unison notes happening, and you're also playing two different chord inversions, "at once". (At least so to speak).

A 5 string "Drop D" capo can be fun also. On the second fret, you get, "drop E" tuning.

Obviously anything you can do in drop D will work, but it doesn't change the tuning intervals of the guitar, so all of the normal chord shapes/ fingerings don't change. When you fret the E-6, you still get the expected note, and don't have to compensate as you would with actual drop D tuning.

Best candidate I can think of for this would be The Beatles, "Norwegian Wood". It's recorded in E, but much richer harmonically if you play it in D. So, "Drop E".



You're right apart from the bit in bold. You mean different voicings, not different inversions.
#12
Quote by derek8520
You're right apart from the bit in bold. You mean different voicings, not different inversions.
If anything other than the root is the lowest note in a chord, I believe it's considered to be an inversion. Technically it would be arrayed, 1st, 3rd, 5th.

So, IMO, (at least for the time being), I'm going to consider a "chord voicing", synonymous with a "chord inversion".

In the case of two, (or more), instruments playing simultaneously, if the root were the lowest note, I expect we could call that "voicing", "uninverted", since the notes are summed in presentation.

For example a guitar is playing a G5 "chord", the notes would be G (root), & D (5th).
The bass player plays a B natural, which turns the overall chord into a G major. But, since the 3rd is in the bass, that's an inversion.

Hey, if I'm wrong about, feel free to let me know. (That really went without saying, didn't it)?
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 26, 2013,
#13
Quote by KG6_Steven
Or, like many of us, you can just play the barre chords and skip using the capo.


So let's say you're playing bluegrass. You're playing Foggy Mountain Breakdown, just like this:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bRSZt0VZoAw

But wait! Everyone knows that Foggy Mountain Breakdown is usually played in A. But... oops! Looks like you skipped bringing your capo. It looks like your band is gonna have to play Mountain Dew instead. Let's see... how does it go?

"Down the road there's a bar, from here it ain't too far,
Where you can hear some wicked bluegrass.
But if you go to play, and you can't play in A,
The crowd is gonna kick your ass."

"They call it that good ol' Mountain Dew,
There's an airborne jug headed for you,
You can't play in A, and that's not okay,
Now you're gonna get hit with a jug of that ol' Mountain Dew!"

Let that be a lesson to you. Always bring a capo unless you want your open notes to be wrong.
There's no such thing; there never was. Where I am going you cannot follow me now.
Last edited by theogonia777 at May 27, 2013,
#14
omg i love you kristen omg
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#15
Quote by Captaincranky
If anything other than the root is the lowest note in a chord, I believe it's considered to be an inversion. Technically it would be arrayed, 1st, 3rd, 5th.

So, IMO, (at least for the time being), I'm going to consider a "chord voicing", synonymous with a "chord inversion".

In the case of two, (or more), instruments playing simultaneously, if the root were the lowest note, I expect we could call that "voicing", "uninverted", since the notes are summed in presentation.

For example a guitar is playing a G5 "chord", the notes would be G (root), & D (5th).
The bass player plays a B natural, which turns the overall chord into a G major. But, since the 3rd is in the bass, that's an inversion.

Hey, if I'm wrong about, feel free to let me know. (That really went without saying, didn't it)?



Playing an open D chord with a capo on the 5th fret means the root (G) is the lowest note. So it's just a voicing rather than inversion.
#16
Quote by derek8520
Playing an open D chord with a capo on the 5th fret means the root (G) is the lowest note. So it's just a voicing rather than inversion.
Only if you play just the top four strings. Were you to span the top 5 strings, (and this is often done with this shape), the lowest note would be a "D", which is the 5th of a G chord, Isn't it?

But, playing the two guitars together AND using a full 6 string G open, places a G as the bass note, and hence the total chord is not inverted.

If you want to call D major open played on 5 strings a "slash chord" ( D/A ), I'm on board with that also.

With the guitar the whole issue of "voicings" or "inversions" is a tad murky anyway, because of the non linear tuning. Actually, not a lot of guitar chord shapes display the 1, 3, 5 format that is the hallmark of an un-inverted chord. They can be there, but you kinda need to hunt them down.

Sit down at the piano and experiment. You'll find that every different note of a triad chord you begin on (left hand), produces a different inversion. Note also that added notes with the right hand can contribute to the "voicing". So, a chord can be an "inversion, and have a unique "voicing", simultaneously.

Here's a very short page on chord inversions: http://musiced.about.com/od/lessonsandtips/ht/inversions.htm
Last edited by Captaincranky at May 27, 2013,