#1
Weather your learning a cover tune or a classical masterpiece, you still have to learn it.
There are several way of learning and if you know more about how you learn then you can purposefully learn instead of passively learning with less frustration and more time to enjoy the material.

My usual go to is by ear. Every musician who wants to improve their skills over time should learn how to do this. Though its not the fastest way for me to learn. If I need to learn in a hurry, I need to learn from the source composer. That can be in person, by video, or audio. IMO thats the order of effectiveness too.

Im auditioning for a Minneapolis band named Scream at the Sun in 2 weeks.
So while learning these songs the thought of learning popped into my head.
And now im here asking you, How do you learn?
#2
Ear, and occasionally sheet music.

I view music much like Victor Wooten and Guthrie Govan does, i see it as a language. And therefor i treat is as such. We learned to speak well by imitating people who could already speak, so learning to play should come from learning to imitate other good players material, until you get to that point were you can speak for yourself.

None was good at speaking before they tried it and failed countless amounts of times, therefor i also think you should accept and embrace that sometimes you play stuff that are "wrong" or "bad", it's a natural learning process.

We learned to talk way before we learned how to write, and how to use correct grammar and correct terms. Same with music, you should "learn the sound" before you learn the theory behind the sound.

That's my point of view.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
Last edited by Sickz at May 25, 2013,
#3
Well, I think if you're learning something to perform it (or your audition in this case) You should know it in and out.

In my band, whenever we learned a cover song, I found that it was easiest if I charted it out.

I think being able to read a chart is important, but I think it's the process of sitting down, listening to the song and picking out the small things that make a huge difference between playing something ok and playing something really well.

I'm all for learning by ear, it's really the only way, but I do go for tabs and sheet music and chord charts and lesson videos and to my teacher if I need something.

I think it's crazy how musicians all the way upto the 80s/early 90s had to learn everything by ear. They didn't have the technology we have to just look a song and learn it. I think that makes them better than us in a way (especially the early era of rock musicians; hendrix, page, clapton, etc)
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness
#4
When I want to learn a song, I listen to it a couple of times and figure it out by ear. Granted, my ear still isn't the best, it's fun and challenging to figure something out on guitar.

After I get a bit of the song down, I work on it a bit and "fill in" the blanks with my theory knowledge than I look up a tab, lesson video, or a cover of someone doing it and fine tune any things that I didn't get.

What I got to do is sit down and set up a certain time each day where I use the ear training thing at musictheory.net so I can improve my ear much quicker. I'm pretty decent and figure some things out, but I definitely need the practice to get better.
Skip the username, call me Billy
#5
Quote by TDKshorty

I think being able to read a chart is important, but I think it's the process of sitting down, listening to the song and picking out the small things that make a huge difference between playing something ok and playing something really well.


Can we be friends? I honestly didnt think about using charts while writing this post.
I love charting stuff out! It gives me so many note options, good stuff.

+1
#6
I listen to the song and usually write out a very simple chord chart for it. I then keep on playing the song until I have memorised it. The chart is only an initial step, I dont take them to band practice or use them at gigs. You either know the song or you dont
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
Soundcloud
#7
I learn by ear but make my own tab. I kind of write down everything I hear. And at the same time I learn the song. Or that's what I used to do. I think nowadays I'll just figure out the song by ear, though usually I write down the hardest parts so that I can play them accurately.

But I'm very slow if I need to read a tab by somebody else. Also usually tabs made by other people are inaccurate and have lots of mistakes. I don't really like them. It's just faster to listen to the song and figure the parts out by myself.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
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Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#8
Quote by jasper.eads
Can we be friends? I honestly didnt think about using charts while writing this post.
I love charting stuff out! It gives me so many note options, good stuff.

+1


One of my teachers demanded we make charts for class. I'd always do mind, even if at the last minute, but I'd be the only one who did and I hated sitting around waiting for everyone else to learn the song.
THAT'S NOT WHAT REHEARSAL IS FOR!!!



But it's pretty eye-opening, I think, to be able to find the structure of a song, and it really helps because there are so many wrong tabs out there and if you're playing a song by tab you're not always going to be playing it right.
You end up trusting somebody else's ear, and while they may be right, in the end you're not trusting your own
And we will weave in and out of sanity unnoticed
Swirling in blissfully restless visions of all our bleary progress
Glowing in radiant madness