#1
What does it mean to ad lib? Take for instance a solo section of as song. If it is in 4/4 time at 76 bpm can you play parts not in 4/4 time or at 76 bpm and just come up with anything that sounds good , if that is even possible to sound good when not following the proper time sig and bpm.
#2
it basically means at liberty, so you play in free time as opposed to a strict metronome time, and yes, its possible to make it sound good :P
#4
Quote by Unreal T
but are you playing in "free time" against a strict time sig and tempo ?



i'm not entirely sure what you're saying? are you meaning that an ensemble or something is playing along with you in a strict time signature and you're playing in a free time signature over them? I guess i've never experiences that (unless its like a vocalist riffing or something, but then I wouldn't necessarily say it is ad lib), generally the ensemble would either follow what the lead is doing, or drop out entirely.

as an example, this is a trumpet piece I played in high school (this isn't me playing), a short ad lib sections occurs at 1:30ish where the piano drops out and the trumpet goes free with the tempo.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Zd_vSvHm41o
Last edited by Tyson2011 at May 26, 2013,
#5
hmmm. well I was thinking if you have a standard rock drum beat in 4/4 and some chords following it in 4/4....and then the soloist started playing over the top of it but disregarding the time sig , but only towards the end of phrases and in certain instances to give it some variety. I thought that can be " ad - libbing".
#6
Quote by Unreal T
hmmm. well I was thinking if you have a standard rock drum beat in 4/4 and some chords following it in 4/4....and then the soloist started playing over the top of it but disregarding the time sig , but only towards the end of phrases and in certain instances to give it some variety. I thought that can be " ad - libbing".



Thats generally not the case, in those instances I'm pretty sure it'd just come off as him playing out of time because he wouldn't match up with anything that is going on. I"m sure there is some instance or another to prove me wrong because there always is, but in general I'm pretty sure that isn't right.
#7
It means you can improvise and don't have to worry about strictly keeping time. But, it also means that the player is trusted to keep it tasteful. Don't go all Gojira on a Mozart piece.
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#8
Quote by rockingamer2
It means you can improvise and don't have to worry about strictly keeping time. But, it also means that the player is trusted to keep it tasteful. Don't go all Gojira on a Mozart piece.


bros should never go full gojira
#9
ad libitum: Without advance preparation. Said or done without having been planned or written*in advance
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#10
Quote by Unreal T
What does it mean to ad lib? Take for instance a solo section of as song. If it is in 4/4 time at 76 bpm can you play parts not in 4/4 time or at 76 bpm and just come up with anything that sounds good , if that is even possible to sound good when not following the proper time sig and bpm.
"Ad lib" isn't even a strictly music only term. I'm not sure why everybody's addressing it as such.

It has a variety of connotations, but "ad" in Latin is either "at" or "to", and "libere" (I believe) would be the infinitive form of the verb, "to free". It's primarily associated with, "to improvise.

If you forget the words to a speech you're giving, you would "improvise", or "ad lib".

Make it up as you go along, is another commonly accepted use of the term, "ad lib".

"I just won an Academy Award, I didn't have a speech prepared, so I had to "ad lib". Like that.
#11
ad lib can mean to improvise, but many times an ad lib section is written into a piece of music with notes already written in, and only the tempo is to be played with