#1
Hi All,
Is there an easy way to memorize the chords to each key?

for example..if I randomly hear 4,5,1 chord progression and the key is B.

how can I know what the chords 4,5,1 are?

Is it just sit at a chart and memorize?

Also that circle of 5ths diagram...is there an easy way to memorize that?
Last edited by ken styles at May 28, 2013,
#2
Drill it until it becomes second nature and use it. It takes time.

Is there an easy way to memorize the chords to each key?
Understand how to harmonize a scale in thirds.

Also that circle of 5ths diagram...is there an easy way to memorize that?

Sharps: Father Charles Goes Down And Ends Battle

Flats: Battle Ends And Down Goes Charles' Father.

A good way to learn this on the fretboard is to know the I-ii-iii-IV-V-vi-(vii dim) as chords on strings 6 for the first three and string 5 for the last three for the common keys. I put (vii dim) because this is uncommon, the minor 7th flat five will usually be in it's place if you hear it.
#3
the only chord definitively in a key is the chord to which chord progressions of that key resolve (the I or i)

the diatonic chords derived from the scale corresponding to the chord to which the key resolves are a default but by no means a prescriptive measure of what you can use to build a progression provided to adhere to the subdom->dom->tonic relationship

thereby i'd say worry more about chords in existing progressions and understand how they support that relationship rather than what chords could theoretically work in a progression by establishing your own context without a thorough analysis of different contexts

tl;dr learn some songs and worry about what chords are in the music rather than what chords are in the key

it's easy enough to figure out the key ex post facto that you don't need to isolate your ability to create music to the confines of what is suggested might support a key. i mean shit, nigga
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Last edited by Hail at May 28, 2013,
#4
Quote by ken styles
Hi All,
Is there an easy way to memorize the chords to each key?

for example..if I randomly hear 4,5,1 chord progression and the key is B.

how can I know what the chords 4,5,1 are?

Is it just sit at a chart and memorize?

Also that circle of 5ths diagram...is there an easy way to memorize that?



you can use this chart to help you memorize the chords diatonic to C Major..

Chords in the Key of C Major

play them ascending and descending. Play chord progressions, play songs....

Then do the same with other keys when you are ready.
#5
Quote by ken styles
Hi All,
Is there an easy way to memorize the chords to each key?

for example..if I randomly hear 4,5,1 chord progression and the key is B.

how can I know what the chords 4,5,1 are?

Is it just sit at a chart and memorize?

Well, is the key major or minor? If it's major, then 4, 5, & 1 will always be major chords (notated usually as IV, V, I). If it's minor, they'll always be minor chords (notated usually as iv, v, i). There's a reason so many people use the 4, 5, 1 progression, lol.

As to determining the chords, well...figure out the key. Let's assume the key is Bminor. So, the chords of any minor key are i, iidim, III, iv, v, VI, VII. So, we know the i chord is Bminor. Therefore, the iv must Eminor, right? Why? Well, because we can simply go through the chords until we arrive at the iv chord. i is Bminor, iidim is C#dim, III is Dmajor -- so, iv MUST be Eminor. For the v chord, we simply go up a whole step from iv, making it F#minor in this case.

By understanding the diatonic chords (basically, chords built on the intervals of the key signature [1, 2, b3, 4, 5, b6, b7 for any minor key and 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7 for any major key]), we can determine the chords in any key quickly.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at May 28, 2013,
#6
Quote by ken styles
Hi All,
Is there an easy way to memorize the chords to each key?

for example..if I randomly hear 4,5,1 chord progression and the key is B.

how can I know what the chords 4,5,1 are?

Is it just sit at a chart and memorize?

Also that circle of 5ths diagram...is there an easy way to memorize that?


Its getting into introduction to harmony. In the key of B

Co5 is for reference purposes, notice how in the Key of B it has 5 sharps.

B C D E F G A B
B C# D# E F# G# A# B Relative minor is G#.

The interval formula (distance between notes)
1 2 3 4 5 6 7 1. you should already know how to make a chord. 1 3 5 is a Major chord. chords are made by stacking 3rds.

Lets make a chord with the 4th interval E. count from the E to its 3rd, Its G# now from the 3rd of G#, its B so E G# B is another 1 3 5 Major chord

heres another look. I understood easier viewing the entire scale.

E F# G# A# B C# D#
1 2 3 #4 5 6 7 1

Its The same scale only in a different order to show how the other notes relate to E as A chord.

G# major chord is G# C D#. So to fit in the Key of B G# major becomes Minor.
G# A# B C# D# E F# G#
1 2 b3 4 5 b6 b7 1 Stacking the 3rds again G# is a minor chord 1 b3 5. G# B D#.

Same scale B major/G# minor. Just showing you how the other intervals relate to G#.

So You pretty much Take the note you want to make a chord. Stack the 3rds, Change the quality of the chord to suit the key your in.

1 4 5 means progression. B=1 E=4 F#=5
F# Major is F# A# C#. Is F# major going to fit in the key of B major without altering the chord quality?
#7
Like has been said, if you want the diatonic chords for a particular key then it's really not that hard to derive them quickly provided you know your intervals well.

Here's how I think about it:

The key is B major & you wanna know what chord is the 4 & 5. In a major key the 4 & 5 chords are both major so I already know both chords are going to be major. The perfect 4th of B is E & the perfect 5th of B is F# so putting both of these together I know that the 4th chord of B major is E major & the 5th chord is F# major.

That's my thought process. Earlier posts touched on where those connections came from so I'll just summerize it:

In a major key the chords always follow this pattern:

I (major) - ii (minor) - iii (minor) - IV (major) - V (major) - vi (minor) - vii (diminished)

In a minor key they follow the same pattern but the vi is now the tonic so it goes:

i (minor) - ii (diminished) - III (major) - iv (minor) - v (minor) - VI (major) - VII (major)

The intervals you need to know to find the root of each chord comes from the corresponding scale
For major:

1 - 2 - 3 - 4 - 5 - 6 - 7

For minor:

1 - 2 - b3 - 4 - 5 - b6 - b7
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#8
Quote by ken styles
Hi All,
Is there an easy way to memorize the chords to each key?

for example..if I randomly hear 4,5,1 chord progression and the key is B.

how can I know what the chords 4,5,1 are?

Is it just sit at a chart and memorize?

Also that circle of 5ths diagram...is there an easy way to memorize that?



Learn how to spell out any major scales, and then how they are harmonized, and practice that. The quality of chords in each key is the same. For example, a ii Chord in G is minor as it would be in A or C or whatever. The secret is understanding intervals. What interval/note is a 3rd away from Db for example? F.

Best,

Sean
#9
You can sit down and do the math with your scales. It's a lot more useful to know why the diatonic chords are major or minor.
#10
I have to sit down and try to absorb this stuff..

I also bought a full sized keyboard to help me with the intervals because I can see the notes laid out nice and neat with piano keys then transfer them over to the guitar.
#11
Quote by ken styles
I have to sit down and try to absorb this stuff..

I also bought a full sized keyboard to help me with the intervals because I can see the notes laid out nice and neat with piano keys then transfer them over to the guitar.



I was just going to suggest a keyboard. The key of C on the keyboard makes
everything nice and clear.

The fretboard is an utter nightmare when it comes to theory.
#12
Yes sir,
It makes going half steps and whole steps a little more clear.

of course I don't know how to play full chords on a keyboard like I can a guitar...but hey, one note at at time...lol