#1
Hello Everyone,

I have been playing guitar for two years now and I must say I am quite tired of playing other peoples songs. Every time I pick up the guitar I either play songs that I already know or I learn new songs. I would like to be able to pick up the guitar and create music instead of just vomiting other peoples work back up haha. So can anyone offer some things that I should focus on learning? I would like to play blues-rock efficiently and be able to improvise and write my own songs. I really like players like Clapton and Mayer who are great guitarists, but can also write really good songs, but first things first I need to learn more and become a good player. So what are the things that a blues-rock player should know (arpeggios, scales, etc.)? And I'm all for learning theory too so what should I learn regarding that?

Thank you
#3
Quote by Chorstman
Hello Everyone,

I have been playing guitar for two years now and I must say I am quite tired of playing other peoples songs. Every time I pick up the guitar I either play songs that I already know or I learn new songs. I would like to be able to pick up the guitar and create music instead of just vomiting other peoples work back up haha. So can anyone offer some things that I should focus on learning? I would like to play blues-rock efficiently and be able to improvise and write my own songs. I really like players like Clapton and Mayer who are great guitarists, but can also write really good songs, but first things first I need to learn more and become a good player. So what are the things that a blues-rock player should know (arpeggios, scales, etc.)? And I'm all for learning theory too so what should I learn regarding that?

Thank you


It takes time to develop you own style man if you have only been working at it for 2 years. Are you transcribing and trying to emulate others sounds? Blues is simple music in terms of note choice, it's mainly about the phrasing. Listen to Funkadelic's Maggot Brain and you will see how the note choice is simple but it's gorgeous phrasing.

If you want to incorporate some new ideas, try tons of other stuff genres and meld it into your own ideas.

As far as theory, start with the blues scale, notes , intervals.
#4
Ive been playing for over 20 years and I can tell you I wasted a lot of time noodling. I would suggest you get a book about songwriting to help you de-construct songs you like. You will start to see the chord progressions common to blues rock and see how Clapton or other Brit Blues player put things together. A good book that is a fun read is Rikki Rooksby Writing songs on guitar. He uses real song examples and shows how the major scale made up the chord progressions etc. I had a lot of DOH! moments reading that book. Another valuable thing is transcribing songs. I use a program called Song Surgeon to slow down tracks so I can figure out the licks, riffs, and solos. You may think you hear one thing but when you slow it down and spend an hour trying to get a few bars, you open you ears and eyes to the fingerboard.
Now when I play I dont noodle up and down the scales. I actually see progressions and chord groupings. I start thinking roman numeral progressions with scales on top of them. Now my practicing is more musical and less technical.