#1
Just been noodling around lately and I played this, it sounded pretty cool but could it make it in metal music today or have any potential? Any criticism is welcome. vocaroo . com/i/s0Rhz3lNdU0W
#2
Have you written any other stuff? It's very unlikely - no matter how good your song is - to write a successful song. And I would say it sounded pretty generic. But it doesn't matter. Add other instruments and vocals and stuff and see how good it sounds. Remember that not every song you write needs to be released. But I would still advise you to finish that song. It's always good practice to write complete songs, no matter how bad it sounds in the end. Not every idea you come up with is pure gold (even if you think so) but it's still good to write complete songs. As you write more songs, you'll start hearing which of your ideas really are gold and which aren't that great. (I remember when I wrote my first riff and back then thought it sounded awesome but now it sounds boring to me - but I might still some day force myself to finish my old ideas because as I said, it's good practice.)

Write music for yourself. I wouldn't care that much if nobody liked my music because there are just a few people that will hear my songs. As I said, it's very unlikely that your song will be the next top 10 hit or whatever. And being a top 10 hit has nothing to do with how "good" the song is. If you look at top 10 list now, you'll see that most of the songs sound really generic and really have nothing new in them.

The most important thing is that you like it. But I can't really say anything about that riff (other than IMO it sounded kind of generic) until you have added other instruments and finished the song. Remember that even the most generic riffs can be made sound pretty good if you just add drums, bass and some melody and write a complete song.

If you want to start recording, I would get some kind of recording software and some recording equipment. What I use for recording is my Digitech RP355 (nothing special but gets the job done) and Cubase LE4 that came with it.
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#3
Quote by rohan.sharma.18
...could it make it in metal music today or have any potential?

Let me stop you right there.
If "making it in metal music today" is your goal, then you really don't need to spend that much time on your music. Making it in any genre has more to do with networking, busting your ass to play shows, and presenting yourself in an interesting way that stands out from other bands.
Since this is the Recordings forum, though, I'll do what I can with what you have. Those riffs are very generic. This is a bad thing. You could write the best generic riff in the world, and it still wouldn't be enough to make you stand out from the millions of other generic post-Gothenburg bands out there.
Like the other post said, a few riffs don't mean very much. We don't have magic 8-balls that tell us whether a band will make it from a minutes' worth of guitar tracks. There are too many other factors involved, and you should really work on those instead.
And Vocaroo? Really?