#1
Hello Friends!

I have a new recording on my UG player called "Programmed." A modern Alternative Rock song consisting of guitar, vocals, bass and drums. Please give it a listen and let me know what you think.

http://profile.ultimate-guitar.com/jsantos/
The song is called "Programmed."

Just a quick performance note about this musical piece. The whole song is only 2 chords (which are Am to F, except one change on the bridge (Dm) for the solo), and I experimented with modulation. This means the Am switches from Dorian on the clean verse, Phrygian on the heavy riff, to Locrain Diminished on the Chorus, all resolving to FMajor. It builds tension as it progresses. The drummer and bassist also added to the build ups with syncopation.

Thanks!

recorded with cubase SE3.
#2
Nice song. It has lots of cool stuff, I like the clean riff. The bass "solo"was cool too. Yeah, lots of dynamics and that's what I like.

Things to improve: I think the clean riff would sound better if the strings rang all the time. Now I can hear some muted notes so maybe try to play it a bit cleaner? I'm not sure what fingerings you use but I tried to play the riff and it was easy to let the strings ring all the time. Also the vocals in the beginning were a bit out of tune but they got better as the song progressed.

And you actually didn't experiment with modulation because modulation means changing the key and it stays in the key of A minor all the time, even though you play some accidentals. I kind of understand what you mean by those "modulation" things (you used notes outside of the A minor scale) but a better way to say that would be that you experimented with accidentals. And it really doesn't resolve to F major, it resolves to A minor - that's the key center. But enough of this theory stuff - it can be discussed in the MT forum.

Want to C4C (my new not-so-serious thrash/punk song )? https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?p=31506403#post31506403
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#3
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Nice song. It has lots of cool stuff, I like the clean riff. The bass "solo"was cool too. Yeah, lots of dynamics and that's what I like.

Things to improve: I think the clean riff would sound better if the strings rang all the time. Now I can hear some muted notes so maybe try to play it a bit cleaner? I'm not sure what fingerings you use but I tried to play the riff and it was easy to let the strings ring all the time. Also the vocals in the beginning were a bit out of tune but they got better as the song progressed.

And you actually didn't experiment with modulation because modulation means changing the key and it stays in the key of A minor all the time, even though you play some accidentals. I kind of understand what you mean by those "modulation" things (you used notes outside of the A minor scale) but a better way to say that would be that you experimented with accidentals. And it really doesn't resolve to F major, it resolves to A minor - that's the key center. But enough of this theory stuff - it can be discussed in the MT forum.

Want to C4C (my new not-so-serious thrash/punk song )? https://www.ultimate-guitar.com/forum/showthread.php?p=31506403#post31506403


Wow thanks for the in-depth analysis MaggaraMarine! I recognize your name from MT. I used to be a regular there since 2008 but became very busy with music projects.

So I agree with the vocal pitch problem in the beginning of the song and my singer does find the zone later on as the song progress. One way we are fixing this before we book real studio time is that I will transcribe the vocal lines into notation. That way, we can sightread until consistency.

The staccato playing for the clean parts is because I wanted the vocals to stand out at the first parts of the verses. My thinking was that the vocal melodies are long in duration and I wanted to offset that with the guitar. You may be right with the erroneous term usage for my explanation. lol I know the terms "Modes" is like a no-no in MT.

I wanted to create an escalating tension from the Am to the F. So my thinking was if I started with an A dorian riff, and then Phrygian while accenting on the b2 and then locrian with b2, b,5 I can create a stronger conflict for a cadence to the F.

I guess if you play the locrian riff as a chord it will be half diminished. Anyway, I need to do some more research on creating tension. But thanks for the valuable insight.

Oh, by the way! I'll check out your music later and comment on them. My flash player in this computer is outdated.
Last edited by jsantos at May 30, 2013,