#1
Hi there,

These days I have been practicing the song "Lucretia" by Megadeth. Some parts are tricky and others are quite fast, ast least for me.

I am kind of stuck and I was wondering how do you guys build up your speed when practicing a challenging song.

Do you rather slow down each little section or do you play the whole thing slowly ?
What is the most efficient way ?
#2
I like playing the whole thing slowly to make sure I'm alternative picking correctly and the right way (sometimes you need to start the riff with up stroke and sometimes with down stroke). By the whole thing I mean entire riff, not entire song.
Last edited by Aukustus at May 30, 2013,
#3
Just start off by playing it a slow enough speed where you can play every note perfect (and with a metronome so you are in time as well). Play at that speed over and over and then slowy increase the tempo, but only to a speed where you still can hit every note correctly. If you repeat a part enough you will eventually get it. Its all about getting the muscle memory there
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#4
What i tend to do, is take a few bars of a riff/melody and play it slowly until i've memorized a chunk. Next i'll play several bars at a slighter faster tempo, then increasing the speed until i start fumbling every other note. When i completely mess up, i start again (real slow) and work my way up until i can play at the right tempo. Then once i got a small chunk under control, i move onto the next few bars.
#5
Isolate each section that you can't play and practice that, no matter how short that section turns out to be.
Be it nailing a certain note, a short 3-note section or a whole riff.
It's somewhat a waste playing something that's 10 seconds long when you are practicing if it's just 0.5 second of it that is a struggle to you.
Obviously you need to start putting it together at some point, but for starters at least, I'd split it up into as many sections as needed and practice them individually.

Practice what you can't play, even if it's not as "fun" as just playing the parts you can play well.
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#6
Chop the song into sections, be it riff to riff or half of riff to half of riff. And work them out individually.

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#7
Personally, I prefer to take a longer term view, and rather that trying to learn to play a song quickly, just learn how to play quickly.

Drills are boring as hell, but if you want to get really good, there is no alternative. You can spend let's say, 100 hours learning this song, but it will only help a little bit when you come to learn the next.

Spend 500 hours drilling, and you'll get this song and a thousand others under your belt in just a few hours each.
#8
I recommend only focussing on the parts that are giving you a hard time. I mean, it's pointless to practice the whole song slowly knowing that you can play everything fine but (for example) the solo.

This song has some tough riffs, especially the intro and the pre-solo rhythm section (and the solo itself ofcourse, which goes without saying), so don't give up quickly on this one. If it's too hard for you, give it a break and come back a month later. You'll be surprised to see the progress you've made.
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#9
Break it up into sections and practice slowly...a little at a time. Once I begin feeling pretty comfortable with a song and have most/all the different segments down; I start trying to play along with the track its self.
#10
I play in small sections slowly and make sure im getting my technique right, then i start to speed it up slowly. If I still cant get it down I watch my fretting hand to see what im doing wrong then i watch my picking hand for what im doing wrong. Then Il slow it down again adjusting what im doing wrong till I get it.
#11
Thanks for the replies everyone.


Quote by sannyasidharma
Drills are boring as hell, but if you want to get really good, there is no alternative. You can spend let's say, 100 hours learning this song, but it will only help a little bit when you come to learn the next.

Spend 500 hours drilling, and you'll get this song and a thousand others under your belt in just a few hours each.


I am not sure I got your point. What is the difference between drilling and learning this particular song ? If the song is giving me a hard time and I eventually manage to play it correctly, it will help me to learn other songs which have similar parts, won't it?

Quote by My Last Words
This song has some tough riffs, especially the intro and the pre-solo rhythm section (and the solo itself of course, which goes without saying), so don't give up quickly on this one. If it's too hard for you, give it a break and come back a month later. You'll be surprised to see the progress you've made.


I am indeed struggling to play both of those parts.
#12
Drilling is playing stuff that isn't necessarily music. Just practicing technique.

It can include scales and arpeggios, but also plain chromatic stuff.

For example, play 1st, 2nd, 3rd, 4th fret on top E, with corresponding fingers, alternate picking. Then move up one position and repeat. Do this al the way up to fret 12, then back down
then move to the next string, the next, to the bottom E, then back again.

Then do 4th, 3rd, 2nd, 1st fret, move up one position, then another, just as before.

Then do it in threes.

Then do both again, but do 1, 2, 3, 4 pos on string two, then string 1, then move up one pos.

Then in 3s on 2 strings.

Do it slow enough so it's utterly clean, and keep at it until you can do the whole lot, dead clean, dead quick.