#1
What does it take to teach guitar at a music store? If you have a solid foundation of working music theory, know how to read music, and can play well is that all it takes?

What if you can only play rock/blues stuff and played just like this...

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EKZ-L9_-otk

Would you be guaranteed a music teaching job? Edit: What if though it is all you have to show is your playing skills? Like if you never gigged or have any credentials.
Last edited by Unreal T at May 30, 2013,
#4
Lmao @ the crowd
"WHAT THE **** IS THAT?!?!"
Drunks.
I assume to teach at a music store they would want you to have some experience teaching, to have a good knowledge of theory, and to be able to play more than just pentatonics. There are plenty of good players out there, so experience and having a good personality would probably go far.
#5
I love how everybody in that crowd is absolutely shitting themselves over that solo.
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#6
Well, its not really as difficult as you may think. I worked in a couple different music stores in town for a few years and it seems most music stores have the same set up.

Basically, the store has lesson rooms. Those rooms get booked by teachers. Those teachers then pay rent-per-lesson they teach.

A major thing that could stand in your way is the amount of guitar teachers at the store already. If they already have multiple teachers, chances are they will not rent a room to you, in fear of taking away business from their friends essentially. That being said, even if a store has a couple teachers, their availability may not be perfect, and if you could fill gaps that they can't, that bodes well for you.


Another thing that would help is getting a reputation. Start out giving lessons to a few people, put an ad on craigslist or something. Once you have a handful of students, that gives way more incentive for a store to open a spot for you, say one day a week. You go in, teach a block of 5-10 lessons, store gets paid, you get paid, you also get face time at the store. From there, its easy.


Also, as far as what and how you play, its kind of up to you. Even an novice player can teach beginners, an intermediate player can teach novices etc. Also some teachers specialize in theory, others in jamming, others in shredding. The biggest thing is to establish yourself.


A drum teacher at one of my stores pulls in roughly 55k a year from lessons. It is his life, but he makes crazy money for doing what he loves.
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Last edited by axethrower13 at May 30, 2013,
#7
Wasn't bad. If you dropped the reverb and distortion, would YOU be able to play that? I bet he could. Was decently clean too. I you can pull that off like nothing, and know enough material to teach someone and answer questions, and are social an a good teacher in general, you should have no problem.
#8
Did someone else see Whitesnake last night in London? I never hear about this band on here and when I go see them, someone else mentions them the next day lol.
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#9
As someone who teaches at a music store currently, the audition process is only half the battle. Playing this solo would only show that you have facility on guitar. If i played this solo to my boss he would ask me to teach it to him. Now can you do that? But generally you teach acdc and crap so your teaching skills are most important than fast pentatonic licks
#10
Being a good guitarist and musician does not mean you are going to be a good teacher. You have to demonstrate your teaching abilities above all else.
#11
You have to be able to build a good rapport with people, be friendly and keep your tone light and engaging. If they find you boring and weird, they won't want you as their teacher.
#12
Quote by Mistress_Ibanez
You have to be able to build a good rapport with people, be friendly and keep your tone light and engaging. If they find you boring and weird, they won't want you as their teacher.


for once you're right


I've got a mate who does guitar teaching on the side, Good lad as well. They're really just paying him to hang out with him while they jam a bit and learn a few techniques and theory and shit
It's over simplified, So what!

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#13
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for once you're right


I've got a mate who does guitar teaching on the side, Good lad as well. They're really just paying him to hang out with him while they jam a bit and learn a few techniques and theory and shit



'for once'? PFFFT. I'm always right


And yeah I find that people learn best when they are relaxed and having fun. Just chilling out with an occasional bit of learning mixed in would be the best way, I'd imagine. Much better than an intensive session with some emotionally stunted mouthbreathing Dragonforce fan.
#14
It requires you to have no ambitions and a deep desire to waste your life teaching snotty-nosed kids how to play Sweet Child O' Mine.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#15
Quote by Unreal T
What does it take to teach guitar at a music store?
Definitely not drum sticks.
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#17
If you're any good you'll always have something to teach, even if you know fuck all theory or anything, but being a good teacher is more about your personality in my opinion
#18
I've been teaching guitar,bass and piano in a music store for a little over 5 years and the main thing I can tell you is to develop a rough structure to base your teaching on. I don't mean a dogmatic curriculum or anything like that, but have the exercises on hand to help the student with the areas they are struggling with, often you will have to make up an exercise on the spot which you end up adding to your teaching methods. The first year teaching is often trial and error but after you get the ball rolling you get alot more comfortable with the concept.
As I stated earlier a "rough" structure is the best way to get going, for this I recommend doing research on the internet or even trying to find another music instructor to learn from.