#1
Hi,

I'll keep this brief. When I play hard my strings buzz.

I have been playing for 6 years and have never noticed this problem before, and no teachers or any one else have ever mentioned it to me. But that does not mean it is not my technique.

This buzz does not actually seem to sound through an amp. That probably makes you think it is ok. But I have been doing a lot of record with a DI and the DI is picking it up. Add an amp sim and the results are horrible. It could be that recording has shown me a technique bad habbit that I had previously not noticed.

I cannot see any obvious setup issues. My action is not even low, I like it higher than most people.

I know you can only guess but do you have any ideas?

and do you have any ideas of some tests I could do to find out?

Thanks in advanced.
#2
How hard do you play? If you play hard enough on any guitar, you're going to get some string buzz - the strings are vibrating hard enough that they're hitting the frets. Not much you can do about that, except play softer, or have the guitar's set up looked at. Maybe the action an be raised a little, without affecting the playability of the guitar.
#3
The strings can buzz (and also de-tune every once a while) if they're not "locked" to the tuners. I know this cause I had that problem for a long time with my D string. Once I paid enough attention to locking the string, it went away.

KG6_Steven is also spot on.

And is it on every single string? Just noticed your guitar, is it the FR model? If it is, it could even be a bridge angle issue (I know this because I had a cheap guitar with a FR on it).
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#5
It could be anything from the neck being over/under bent, to the strings being duff. Play hard again and listen closely, is the buzz coming from the bridge or the top nut? most likely it'll be the top nut and it sounds to me that either your top nut or your bridge saddles are not the correct size for your guage of strings. As theothers have said though if you play hard you will get buzz its the downside of playing hard. it could even be your frets themselves they might need rounded off a little more or it could be just general wear and tear and your guitar just needs a little love
#6
I tend to play hard from time to time on clean settings and strings buzzing when playing hard usually means you are picking too hard or you could use a higher action. Honestly if you are going to be digging in harder at your strings I would use heavier gauge strings and raise your action. Bluegrass players tend to favour higher action, and the same is for anyone who wants to dig in a bit when picking, raise the action, check the relief of the neck etc...

even with that in mind, dont pick VERY hard, learn your limits with your guitar's setup and adjust from there.
#7
just because your action is higher doesn't mean there can't be buzzes. If the neck is bent, there will be. It always amazes me to see that a really tiny adjustment in the neck is sufficient to completely change the buzzes. A setup is def recommended
Last edited by harmony_melody_ at Jun 1, 2013,
#8
Another thing worth mentioning is I changed from 9 strings to 10. But that was over a year ago and the strings have been changed multiple times since.

But maybe I am only just noticing the buzz because of recording.

Could changing to 10's need a slight raise of the bridge?

I tested my neck in a few ways and it seems ok.
#9
Quote by jkielq91
Another thing worth mentioning is I changed from 9 strings to 10. But that was over a year ago and the strings have been changed multiple times since.

But maybe I am only just noticing the buzz because of recording.

Could changing to 10's need a slight raise of the bridge?

I tested my neck in a few ways and it seems ok.


Changing from a smaller gauge set of strings to a larger set AND keeping the same tuning should theoretically give you a slightly higher action and give a little more neck relief. If anything, you'd maybe need to lower the bridge to compensate.

However, I think in this case it might be boiled down to your technique. Every guitar I've ever owned or played experienced some fret buzz if I played it too hard (unless it had extremely high action...yuck). You really don't gain anything by hitting the strings THAT hard. In some cases I've hit the strings hard enough that the note actually detunes a little (I think I was actually bowing the neck slightly). That sounds like utter shit.

My recommendation is to lighten up on your pick attack, use a lighter pick, or an even heavier gauge set of strings.

Ideally, having more control over your pick attack would be the first priority, as that plays into a whole host of other aspects of guitar playing.
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#10
Quote by KailM
Changing from a smaller gauge set of strings to a larger set AND keeping the same tuning should theoretically give you a slightly higher action and give a little more neck relief. If anything, you'd maybe need to lower the bridge to compensate.

However, I think in this case it might be boiled down to your technique. Every guitar I've ever owned or played experienced some fret buzz if I played it too hard (unless it had extremely high action...yuck). You really don't gain anything by hitting the strings THAT hard. In some cases I've hit the strings hard enough that the note actually detunes a little (I think I was actually bowing the neck slightly). That sounds like utter shit.

My recommendation is to lighten up on your pick attack, use a lighter pick, or an even heavier gauge set of strings.

Ideally, having more control over your pick attack would be the first priority, as that plays into a whole host of other aspects of guitar playing.


this definitely sounds like some thing worth working on.

Cheaper than a tech to if it is successful.