#1
Hi all,

I've recently lowered the action on my les paul epiphone and I'm "trying" to adjust the intonation, starting with lower e string I play it open and then play 12th fret e string, when I play it fretted it appears to be too sharp so I'm slowly adjusting the screw anti-clockwise trying to get it in tune but nothing is happening ... it still remains sharp, the same is happening on all my strings, I know it's meant to be only small adjustments so I've turned it further then I'm willing to go. Any idea what could be happening?

I'm tuning it with a Boss ME-25, stupid question coming, I am assuming when its flashing right hand-side when tuning that means too sharp?

Cheers,
Ross
#2
Keep turning the intonation screw
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#3
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Keep turning the intonation screw


I would but I'm worried about damaging something. I've already tried a whole anti-clockwise turn, I was under the impression the adjustments should be miniscule. Don't want to screw up my bridge if thats possible.
#4
I assumed small adjustments are just for the truss rod... Are the strings new?
#5
Quote by Thamoomin81
I would but I'm worried about damaging something. I've already tried a whole anti-clockwise turn, I was under the impression the adjustments should be miniscule. Don't want to screw up my bridge if thats possible.

Nope, the adjustments should be enough to get it in tune. Since you're moving the saddle away from the neck, you should drop the string tuning a bit before each adjustment, but really there are no other precautions than that.
#7
Quote by Thamoomin81
I would but I'm worried about damaging something. I've already tried a whole anti-clockwise turn, I was under the impression the adjustments should be miniscule. Don't want to screw up my bridge if thats possible.

The very worst that could happen is you break a string. It's not a big deal.
Quote by Axelfox
Reeeeeeeeeeeeeeee

Quote by H4T3BR33D3R
I also have to do that. Cottaging this weekend
#8
Quote by Thamoomin81
I would but I'm worried about damaging something. I've already tried a whole anti-clockwise turn, I was under the impression the adjustments should be miniscule. Don't want to screw up my bridge if thats possible.

You can't possibly screw it up by adjusting the intonation. And these adjustments don't have to be miniscule; you often have to really pull back the low E saddle to get it intonated.

Quote by emad
jthm_guitarist
Warned for trolling!


Quote by metal4eva_22
Didn't you say that you had a stuffed fox that you would occasionally fuck?

Quote by Axelfox
It's not a fox,it's a wolf.
#9
Thanks for the advice, you were right, I was doing NOWHERE near enough adjustments and you were right, lower e is indeed pretty much at the back, so are 3 other saddles. The only issue I do have is the G string, that is as far back as it will go and is still too sharp and the saddle is already turned around but I'm having issues with this string easily going out of tune so will try re-stringing it.
#11
Quote by Thamoomin81
Thanks for the advice, you were right, I was doing NOWHERE near enough adjustments and you were right, lower e is indeed pretty much at the back, so are 3 other saddles. The only issue I do have is the G string, that is as far back as it will go and is still too sharp and the saddle is already turned around but I'm having issues with this string easily going out of tune so will try re-stringing it.

G strings are prone to tuning issues. There are articles you can read about wound vs. unwound. I recently read one specifically about the combination of short scale, angled headstock and unwound G strings being the perfect combination for tuning issues.

Anyway, you should still be able to intonate it. What gauge strings are you using?
#12
You never answered the äre the strings new" question. Do not intonate on old strings.
Moving on.....
#13
Ken I would have thought that intonating on old strings would be better because they've done all of their stretching and shifting etc... Theyd be more stable. New strings can change their tuning in a few minutes when theyre breaking in... Especially G B and high E...
#14
I found with my 24.75" scale guitar, using 11-54 beefy slinky set, the G string would not intonate completely with the saddle all the way back and turned the way that would allow the string to go the farthest. It was a plain 22 gauge and never intonated properly in all of its life before swapping to a lighter set. Bear in mind that some strings just do not intonate on some bridges.

@dazza027 If you stretch new strings properly intonation should last. Once strings start getting rusty and have dirt on them, that's when their intonation goes off whack.
"Air created the greenness. And once you've got something, that leads to otherness." - Karl Pilkington.
#15
Ok, When I mean old I mean a week or so. What about Elixir Nanoweb's? They live forever and ever with out rust or dirt etc...
#16
Quote by KenG
You never answered the äre the strings new" question. Do not intonate on old strings.


Sorry didn't meant to ignore that question.

The strings were not new, they were probably over a year old but I hadn't been playing that guitar all that much. I re-strung the guitar yesterday afternoon and still all are intonated except for the G string, not too sure what else I can do, it's only slightly out so I'm happy to just leave it for now. The strings are Rotosound 10-46, I have always had 10-46 strings on this guitar so not messed with different gauges or anything. Btw I have the action very low, I'm used to Ibanez floyd-roses and like my action low ... I'm guessing that has some baring on the intonation
Last edited by Thamoomin81 at Jun 2, 2013,
#17
Quote by Thamoomin81
Sorry didn't meant to ignore that question.

The strings were not new, they were probably over a year old but I hadn't been playing that guitar all that much. I re-strung the guitar yesterday afternoon and still all are intonated except for the G string, not too sure what else I can do, it's only slightly out so I'm happy to just leave it for now. The strings are Rotosound 10-46, I have always had 10-46 strings on this guitar so not messed with different gauges or anything. Btw I have the action very low, I'm used to Ibanez floyd-roses and like my action low ... I'm guessing that has some baring on the intonation


you could turn the saddle around if you need to. if the saddle on your "G" is like the one in the attached pic, you turn the saddle around so it's oriented like the E, A and D are.




but old strings, i'd also recommend changing them. mine seem to go dead within a couple months if i play it half regularly. then check the intonation and see how it looks.

it's an epi, put your back into it lol.
#18
Quote by dazza027
Ken I would have thought that intonating on old strings would be better because they've done all of their stretching and shifting etc... Theyd be more stable. New strings can change their tuning in a few minutes when theyre breaking in... Especially G B and high E...


Strings don't actually stretch like people think they do. If they did the diameter would change. What really happens is you're taking slack out of the windings and maybe the wrap ends where the string balls are.
If people wrapped their strings under tension and did it very neatly they find as I have that the tuning stabilizes very quickly with only a bit of string pulling needed to get there. Older strings don't ring as true as newer strings which is why the experts say do your intonation with new/fresh strings. Don't confuse pitch of the strings (adjusted by tuners) and length of the strings adjusted via intonation.
Moving on.....
#19
Quote by gregs1020
you could turn the saddle around if you need to. if the saddle on your "G" is like the one in the attached pic, you turn the saddle around so it's oriented like the E, A and D are.


Unfortunately already turned the saddle and still it's not quite right, it's only slightly out, will just leave it for now but might take it for a tech to look at.