#1
Hello everyone!

While this question doesn't necessarily pertain to theory, I believe it is better suited for this forum. I know there are more likely to be pianists here, as opposed to The Pit where half the posters aren't musicians and would only give joke answers.

So I'm moving into my first apartment and don't want to disturb my neighbors with my piano playing. I'm not going to be an ass and play at 2am or anything, but I'm a music major at the local college and it would be very convenient to have a piano to play at my house during the day.

I was thinking putting it against the wall that faces the outside, not one that divides me from my neighbors, would prevent some of the noise from transferring through the walls into their apartment. I also thought about putting a couple of old pillows and a blanket behind it to absorb some of the noise.

Thoughts? Experiences?

Thank you
#2
Piano's are very loud.
I think investing in a good keyboard might be better.
You can't exactly sound proof an apartment, because it's going to cost you a bunch.
If your thinking about pudding up sound absorbing foam on the walls, that's just mainly going to get rid of the echo in the room.
#3
None of that will do anything to mitigate noise. There's no real way to soundproof other than building a suspended room within a room with heavy insulation in between.

Best solution is to just get a good digital piano.

...modes and scales are still useless.


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#4
Electric piano and headphones.
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#6
yeah... good luck soundproofing a piano. It's going to be loud. Investing in a weighted keyboard is probably your best option if you wan to play in an apartment. Otherwise find a house with cheap rent and live there instead. (you might just want to spend most of your time in the practice rooms anyways. better pianos = better practice)
#7
keyboard with weighted keys.

Otherwise don't even worry. If you already have the piano don't worry about it. Go to the neighbours when you first move in and tell them you're a music major and play the piano. Tell them that you will be practicing a lot, find out if they have any babies or anything you need to be mindful of and do your thing.
Si
#8
A major problem is that sound control usually affects the mid range and high frequencies much more than the bass anyway.

You wouldn't be allowed to modify an apartment in such a way you would accomplish much in the way of sound reduction. In fact, people that do this type of thing so they can turn up their stereo, wind up replacing the tweeters, since they themselves can't stand the lack of presence, and the HF roll off.

I'd just do my best to not do "unnecessary" practice with the acoustic piano, and split my time between a keyboard with phones and the piano at times when you're most likely not to antagonize your fellow man with it.

I live in a row house, and built extra walls toward my neighbors home, with layer of fiber glass and Homasote in places where the extra walls can't be full stud depth, I got rid of normal conversation, and I can play an acoustic guitar if I sit in the right place late at night. But, an acoustic piano, that's not happening.

Even with decent isolation from fiberglass filled, full depth, auxiliary walls, impact noise can travel through floor and ceiling joists, even the brick face of the houses, as if the extra walls weren't there.

Moral of the story, when 300 pounds of ugly, screaming, meat next door hits the party wall, it's still a cheap ticket to a front row seat for me....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 3, 2013,
#9
Keyboard isn't really an option, I don't have enough money to invest in one. I only have the piano because my old manager gave it to me for free.
#10
then be prepared to annoy your neighbors. because any non-professional efforts will compromise your sound big time (and thus your practicing)


edit--> you might find that they don't really mind. I lived in a house with very thin walls where my neighbors could hear me practicing, and since I didn't really suck, they enjoyed it.
Last edited by Erc at Jun 3, 2013,
#11
Quote by gunsnroses#1
Keyboard isn't really an option, I don't have enough money to invest in one. I only have the piano because my old manager gave it to me for free.
Any sound control strategy would be more expensive than a usable keyboard! Plus, you wouldn't be allowed to do modifications to an apartment to the extent where it would do any good.

Basic sound control building material, "Homasote" in 4' x8' sheets is about $25.00 a sheet, and it does just about squat, if you were to put it directly against the existing party wall.

Boutique materials sold on the internet for sound control, would cost in the hundreds to do a simple 4' x 8' area, which is the size of a piece of standard sheet.

Quote by Erc
then be prepared to annoy your neighbors. because any non-professional efforts will compromise your sound big time (and thus your practicing)


edit--> you might find that they don't really mind. I lived in a house with very thin walls where my neighbors could hear me practicing, and since I didn't really suck, they enjoyed it.
I was going to suggest that he use the electric key board for practice, and for whole pieces that were under hand, the piano. More of a "recital" strategy.

But, this is sounding more and more like a thread motivated by a rhetorical question.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 3, 2013,
#12
Yeah, soundproofing is expensive and relatively difficult. Certainly more expensive than buying another piano or keyboard.

Your best bets, in order, would be to either:
a) Make friends with the neighbours. Work out a compromise where you can practice without interfering with their lifestyle. If you're even half-way decent, most people don't find a piano as objectionable as a guitar amp or a drum kit.

b) Move.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

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#13
This may sound like a stupid question, but wouldn't the middle pedal be enough? I only have experience with an acoustic piano at my music school (got a digital at home for the same reason), and I've never really heard a piano with the middle pedal engaged through the door. I'd imagine it'd still be a nuisance when it's really late at night, but otherwise it'd be somewhat negligible in the day.

Or do you have a grand piano?
#14
Quote by gunsnroses#1
Keyboard isn't really an option, I don't have enough money to invest in one. I only have the piano because my old manager gave it to me for free.


If you intend to ever play professionally, you'll need a piano that you can take to gigs. If it's just for basic use you can buy an el cheapo casio or the like.

Basically you need to buy a synth.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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