#1
(Hi, I've been a member since 2009 but have never posted.. haha.)

Anyway... I was just changing the strings on my guitar and I noticed that the plastic bridge was messed up. It's also slightly cracked (not visible on the picture) near the fourth string. My high E broke while I was tuning it and I noticed an indent in the saddle hole too. I read this is normal, but the peg kept popping out until the ball finally broke off of the string when I was trying to tune it.

Is this all nothing to worry about? Should I just buy a new E string and move on, or should I look into replacing the bridge and maybe saddle too?

#2
hard to tell by the pic but it looks like the indentations on the saddle are gonna keep breaking strings. it'd be safer to replace it....c'mon..you wanted to upgrade anyway right?
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#3
Quote by Tilde~
(Hi, I've been a member since 2009 but have never posted.. haha.)

Anyway... I was just changing the strings on my guitar and I noticed that the plastic bridge was messed up. It's also slightly cracked (not visible on the picture) near the fourth string. My high E broke while I was tuning it and I noticed an indent in the saddle hole too. I read this is normal, but the peg kept popping out until the ball finally broke off of the string when I was trying to tune it.

Is this all nothing to worry about? Should I just buy a new E string and move on, or should I look into replacing the bridge and maybe saddle too?
It seems like you are confusing the two terms? The "bridge" is the wooden part underneath , while the saddle, is the white plastic, (or "bone") part, the strings actually ride on.

The "bridge" would be major surgery to replace. The "saddle" (white bone or plastic piece), is a $10.00 drop in part.

Now, how is the "action", (string height), on your guitar? You should probably measure no more than 1/8" from the top of the 12th fret, to the bottom of the E-6 string.

The saddle is the part that gets ground down on its bottom to set string height. If you figure the strings would be very close top the top of the wooden bridge should you make the adjustment, it's probably time for a new guitar.

However, if you're happy with the string height, then all you need do, is buy a saddle piece, sand nt down, (if necessary), to set the strings at the height they are now, and you're done.

The wooden bridge always has small grooves at the front of the pin holes, that act as a guide for the strings.

If the bridge isn't cracked, it isn't bad, at least as long as it will still hold the pins in position.

What can and does go wrong with bridges, is the wood on the underside gets dented up or cracked from the ball ends of the strings.

Somebody that knows what they're doing, and is coordinated and careful, can prolong the life of the bridge, by hardening that area of the wood off with the thinnest type of CyA adhesive. (AKA "Crazy" or "Super" glue).

You would use a long nozzle on the glue bottle, and saturate the bridge in the area where the string ball ends rest.

All of this is probably "intermediate" guitar repair, not the real difficult stuff. Still, there would be no shame in taking it to a technician if you would like to save it, and don't feel confident about doing the work yourself...


As far as the "pin kept popping out" issue, you need to make a "J" bend on the ball end of the string you're installing, and make sure you seat the string ball UNDER the lower front lip of the bridge inside the guitar. Otherwise, you can get into a situation where the ball catches the pin and pulls it out when you try and tune it.

From your photo, it looks as though the saddle is trashed, but the bridge looks OK. (marginal photo / educated guess).
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 3, 2013,
#4
Really? you play a acoustic guitar with a plastic saddle and you're worried about repairing it? Dude it's time to move up, even most low end acoustics have bone or wood or ivory saddles, don't throw more money into this thing, buy a new(at least to you ) guitar.
#5
Thanks, both of you.

You're right, Cranky, I got the terms confused. I got a new string and sanded down the saddle under the first and second strings. It tuned fine this time, but I think I'll replace it next time I change the strings. I think the bridge will be okay for now, but thanks for telling me what's involved in replacing it.

Dude who posted while I was posting this: This was a cheap, used guitar that I got as a gift and if I ever got a new one, it would probably be electric. I play very casually (hence my embarrassing term confusion) and I don't mind replacing one part if it's needed.
Last edited by Tilde~ at Jun 3, 2013,
#6
no worries Tilde, every toilet is bound to get one occasionally. that was a pretty stupid comment..... i agree.
it would be nice to be able to just go out and buy anything we wanted wouldn't it( you just shush it cranky ! anh anh anh...shush!! )?
glad to hear its up and playing again. acoustics are better than electrics in my opinion by the way, takes more skill to not have to hide behind a distortion pedal.
need more gear and a lot more talent(courtesytuxs)
#7
acoustics are better than electrics in my opinion by the way, takes more skill to not have to hide behind a distortion pedal.


Heh, that's what my dad said when he got it for me. Takes more skill, better for building strength, etc. I specifically asked for an electric, but this one has definitely grown on me. They both have their merits and I know I'd never abandon my acoustic now :>
Last edited by Tilde~ at Jun 3, 2013,