#1
Hello, this is not concerned with learning one basic major scale pattern or CAGED systems of learning the major scale in different positions I feel that I am passed this stage and although those patterns have been helpful in the past I feel they limit my playing now by confining me to interlinked "box shapes".

For anybody else how did you come to learn the major scale in all 12 keys anywhere on the fretboard? I feel that once I learn how to do this, then learning scale formulas and chord formulas will be a peice of cake. Also how would I go about practicing the 12 major scales all over the fretboard? I am halfway through learning the notes of the fretboard and I have an understanding of the circle of fifths and can spell the 12 major scales on paper.

Any input would be great.

Cheers
#2
If you already know the CAGED system it moves relative to the root note of the chord.

Do you know the notes on the fretboard?
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#3
Quote by AlanHB
If you already know the CAGED system it moves relative to the root note of the chord.

Do you know the notes on the fretboard?



I can name every note on the fretboard although some are quicker to locate than others. I wouldn't say I "know" the fretboard as well as I should.
#4
I am unsure why you cannot play the major scale in all 12 keys already. If you know the notes kinda, and know the CAGED shapes, you should be able to play all the major and minor scale shapes in all 12 majorand minor keys.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#5
Quote by AlanHB
I am unsure why you cannot play the major scale in all 12 keys already. If you know the notes kinda, and know the CAGED shapes, you should be able to play all the major and minor scale shapes in all 12 majorand minor keys.



I can but my problem is that they are just scale boxes and I end up playing notes without knowing what they are, just that they fit in that particular box in that key.
#6
Okay,my tip would be. As soon as you've learned the notes on the fretboard, (this is an ongoing process of course) Lean the Intervals as well. Learn all interval degrees in relationship to the root. To do this in all 12 keys, just simply move the root around. This will clear up any kind of confusion. To really LEARN the major scale and all the other sounds of your guitar, you have to get familiar with them, but how should one get familiar with box shapes and dots you ask, Intervals. Learn every interval degree on your neck and you will now have names and numbers to associate with every sound your guitar makes, excluding micro tones.
Last edited by Ignore at Jun 3, 2013,
#7
How much listening do you do in amongst all this?
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#8
Practice them as keys instead of scales, and always go from the lowest note possible on the neck to the highest, using the 3 note per string shapes you already know.

So if you're practice the key with 0 sharps/flats (C major), you'd start on open Low E and go up to the top of that position, then slide your hand up to the next position and descend:

e-----------------------------------1-3-5-|-7-5-3------------------------------------|
B----------------------------1-3-5--------|-------6-5-3------------------------------|
G---------------------0-2-4---------------|---------------5-4-2----------------------|
D--------------0-2-3----------------------|----------------------5-3-2---------------|
A-------0-2-3-----------------------------|-----------------------------5-3-2--------|
E-0-1-3-----------------------------------|------------------------------------5-3-1-|-3-5-7-....



And take it all the way up to the highest note on the fretboard (D) and come back down. Once you have all 12 major scales memorized, switch scales at the top of the neck to save time in practice.

Say/sing the note names as you play.
#9
Quote by thUnderground12
For anybody else how did you come to learn the major scale in all 12 keys anywhere on the fretboard?

Sound. Melodic and intervallic patterns. Play them, sing them, ascending, descending. Study patterns of 3rds and 4ths to begin with. The move on to 6ths and 7ths.

It takes months, years.
#10
Do it in blocks. Play all 12 scales on frets 1-5 start on the root, go to the highest note, and on the way down play to the lowest note and back up to the root.
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#11
Singing the scales while playing has been mentioned... and I agree. Whatever approach you use it's very valuable to sing the scales as you play, even just some of the time, so you get the sound in the ear as well as knowing the fingerwork. Scale step numbers are good to sing, also letter names. If those are hard to do, just sing any syllables you want. It's some of the best ear training work a person can do and good prep for lots of other more advanced ear training and theory knowledge. And it builds a really strong connection between the hands and the mind's ear.

I do scale and arpeggio work every day. I like to move chromatically up a half step each day from the day before to a new key, doing a set of scales and arpeggios covering the range of the fingerboard.

Once you feel at home with a particular scale fingering it's good to find ways to make scale practice creative and musical, not just academic.
Last edited by Tim Lawler at Jun 7, 2013,
#12
skimming through some of this advice is painful

TS, learn your intervals and build chords off of the major scale. once you can relate every note - non-linearly - to the root and understand the relationship, the fretboard quickly becomes less scary because those boxes suddenly become chords, relationships, sounds, and contexts.

also:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UvKEpAYZjlE
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#13
All good info above. Here's how I did it. Learn the notes and then learn the 5 octave intervals in 12 keys. Spend some time drilling each one separate for each note. From there you can build a major scale vertically and know the major intervals in relation to each root as 1 to 7. Also learn the scale horizontally on every string. That's the best method I know. When learning notes, do natural first then accidentals. Then minor intervals and other octave runs and you are set.