#1
Could someone point me in the direction of a great site where I can learn from the ground up everything I need to know about scales, modes, tonality, etc. It's great knowing chords on the guitar and their scalar counterparts, but I really want to know why the fretboard is shaped the way it is, why scales and chords "make sense," how to know where and when and why to put certain chords in music.

Or, is this just irrelevant to being a proficient player? I took 8 years of piano, forgot all of this stuff, moved to guitar, and now I feel I need to know it again to understand what I am doing. The guitar isn't nearly as simple as the keys on a piano, or is it?
#3
i'm gonna give you a vocabulary test

tension
resolution
intervals

figure all these out within a musical context and you've just answered all your questions without a bunch of stupid bullshit like scale shapes and modes to get in the way
modes are a social construct
#4
Thank you triface. That seems like an excellent tutorial so far.

But can someone tell me right now why a B note is dissonant to a C major chord, when B is in the C major scale? Is this a desired dissonance or something or what? I may be ahead of myself, but is the B in a C major chord what is called a tension note?
Last edited by MattMurph at Jun 4, 2013,
#5
Two notes being in the same scale doesn't mean they magically sound appropriate when played together.

Half steps (B and C) are always tense, that's their characteristic sound. It's not a note you'd hang around on unless you were going for that sound.
#6
Quote by MattMurph
Thank you triface. That seems like an excellent tutorial so far.

But can someone tell me right now why a B note is dissonant to a C major chord, when B is in the C major scale? Is this a desired dissonance or something or what? I may be ahead of myself, but is the B in a C major chord what is called a tension note?


You need to take Hails vocabulary test and you will have an answer.
#7
Quote by cdgraves
Two notes being in the same scale doesn't mean they magically sound appropriate when played together.

Half steps (B and C) are always tense, that's their characteristic sound. It's not a note you'd hang around on unless you were going for that sound.



Do you have any examples of that sound being used in music?

Would the use of that note in a chord require a different resolution? Would that make it a Cmaj7 chord?

I'm still learning. Have mercy.
#8
Quote by sweetdude3000
You need to take Hails vocabulary test and you will have an answer.


I just looked at all of your past posts, including that one, and if I need to take a vocabulary test, then you need to take a few yourself.

Or, since you obviously know more about music theory than I, perhaps you could be helpful and share your knowledge with everyone and myself, instead of being a dick.
Last edited by MattMurph at Jun 4, 2013,
#9
Quote by MattMurph
I just looked at all of your past posts, including that one, and if I need to take a vocabulary test, then you need to take a few yourself.

Or, since you obviously know more about music theory than I, perhaps you could be helpful and share your knowledge with everyone and myself, instead of being a dick.


I am still learning. I am not trying to be a dick. I see Hail's terse posts, but there are nuggets of wisdom in them.

Anyway, a few fundamental building blocks of music that will help you through your entire career are knowing what tonality is in music, how a major scale is constructed, and knowledge of the intervals. Drill those solid for weeks/months and you will appreciate music more. If you can see the major scale in terms of 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 ( C,D,E,F,G,A,B for the C major scale), you can build any chord or scale with that formula.

To answer the question. The B is not a chord tone in the C major triad which is C - E - G. C = 1, E = 3, G = 5. So the 2, 6, 7 are going to sound dissonant = tension against that. The 7 is the B. It sounds tense because of the major seventh interval. Good composers can exploit tension and release for pleasing effect. A C-E-G-B is referred to as a major seventh chord that has a tension feel and it is asking for resolution.
#10
Quote by MattMurph
I just looked at all of your past posts, including that one, and if I need to take a vocabulary test, then you need to take a few yourself.

Or, since you obviously know more about music theory than I, perhaps you could be helpful and share your knowledge with everyone and myself, instead of being a dick.

Or, ya know, you could just take the test and stop being a wuss. Report back with the correct answers.

Edit:
Also, don't doublepost. There's an edit button for a reason, and it's actually against the rules to doublepost.
Last edited by crazysam23_Atax at Jun 5, 2013,
#11
Quote by MattMurph
Do you have any examples of that sound being used in music?

Would the use of that note in a chord require a different resolution? Would that make it a Cmaj7 chord?

I'm still learning. Have mercy.


You get a dissonant sound from two notes a semitone apart. This interval is called a 'minor second'. It's visible when you look at sound waveforms of the two notes added together: it looks spiky and harsh, just as it sounds. The harsh sound arises because of the 'beats' you hear between two notes close together in frequency.

You will find this interval in many major seventh chord voicings, between the seventh of the chord and the octave of the root note. Even if the octave isn't doubled you hear the dissonance due to harmonics of the root.

To a listener, the dissonance 'wants' to resolve to something more consonant. This can add interest to the sound of the basic triad.

If you listen to the soundtrack of The Prisoner (the 60s sci fi show) you'll often hear two guitars playing notes a minor second apart at suspenseful or tense moments. Here you could say it's being used as an unmusical special effect. The minor second is just about the harshest dissonance you can get in 'normal' music.
#12
Chords & scales "make sense" because chords are formed from the intervals of the corresponding scale. A chord is just a stack of 3rd intervals taken from the scale. That's why you'll sometimes hear theory buffs refer to a major chord as a 1,3,5 because those are the scale degrees that make it up.

In all honesty, scales are more of an academic ordering of the pitches typically found in a particular key, & their importance as a compositional tool is grossly overrated IMO. http://www.musictheory.net/ is a pretty good resource that use as a refresher all the time, but nothing really beats finding a tutor or a good book if you can't find someone.
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#13
I can highly recommend watching this series

http://youtu.be/PnbOWi6f_IM

I think the whole series is on youtube, and whilst you may possibly find some bits a little heavy going you should get a lot out of it
Actually called Mark!

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