#1
Okay, I am pretty good at sweep picking, I can do advanced patterns at high speeds and can combine tapping with the sweep picking. So I'm no longer a beginner and more of an advanced player at sweeping.

Recently I have been doing research and hearing alot of people saying that if you don't occasionally use a metronome while practising sweep picking, shredding even just playing regular then you will be a sloppy guitarist. I have watched multiple videos but can't seem to get the hang of playing with a metronome or even understand how it works.

Any tips, or scales that I can play with the metronome along with the BPM I should start at ? and is it really a necessity to guitar playing ?

Thanks.
#2
I'm not sure what you're asking. What don't you get about playing along with a metronome? You do the same thing you do when you play to a drummer or a prerecorded song or any other musician. Just tap your foot along and play your guitar.
#3
Well what I do is put the metronome at like 130 and put the arpeggios in triplet form. I think that's the most common way to practice them, I'm not sure though.
#4
Find a bpm that feels comfortable, then slow it down 10 bpm, and practice your sweeps and scales in different divisions, like 8ths, 16ths, triplets, sixtuplets, if you wanna go more advanced, try quintuplets and septuplets... And when you got it down PERFECTLY, speed it up a bit.


And yeah, i do think its important to practice with a metronome, I've often played with guitarists who say they can play a certain thing, yet when we get the band together it all sounds sloppy as hell. When the band sounds sloppy, we usually break down every part and have everyone play his part on metronome, to figure out where the problem lies, and you'd be surprised at the often the guitar players simply can't play their riffs on a metronome slowed down a bit.. And after I have them practice everything slowly and with a metronome, the whole band sounds alot tighter.
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Last edited by Ih5g at Jun 4, 2013,
#5
First, if you say you're an advanced sweeper and can't sweep to a metronome, you're not and advanced sweeper. It means that your sweeps are most likely uneven or you don't understand rhythms, in both cases, you'll be in trouble. Contrary to popular belief, tapping your foot does not help you keep in time (often it does the very opposite), so just use the metronome. Depending on the song, you can either sweep with semiquavers (4 to a beat), or in semiquaver triplets (6 to a beat), as those are the most common, so, you should really be practicing them both.

As for, 'is this a necessity', I will say, depends. If you want to hang out with your friends before drinks (or after, you fearless bastard, you) and show them how unbelievably fast you can sweep, no, it's not necessary to practice to a metronome, however, if you wish to be a recording guitarist, yeah, you need to use a metronome for just about everything. I think if I could give myself from three years ago a guitar lesson, I'd say that, unless in a band practice room, always have a metronome in your ear while you have a guitar in your hand, because you'll be spot on with your technique if you start off slow, and when you get into a studio, you'll be able to record your guitar in one or two takes, and your overdubs will sound so tight. I actually now use metronomes on stage, and my performances have just gotten so much better, it's unbelievable.
#6
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
I'm not sure what you're asking. What don't you get about playing along with a metronome? You do the same thing you do when you play to a drummer or a prerecorded song or any other musician. Just tap your foot along and play your guitar.


I just don't understand how it helps
#9
Well by advanced I mean I can play difficult patterns and such, so i created this thread to see how i can improve. Thanks for the tips too ill try it out
#10
Quote by rileymacdonald
Well by advanced I mean I can play difficult patterns and such, so i created this thread to see how i can improve. Thanks for the tips too ill try it out


Oh, of course, it's just with myself, I enforce a very strict policy of 'If I can't record it, I can't play it', as nowadays, the standard of playing is so high, a poorly articulated sweep can stick out like a sore thumb.
#11
Quote by rileymacdonald
Okay, I am pretty good at sweep picking, I can do advanced patterns at high speeds and can combine tapping with the sweep picking. So I'm no longer a beginner and more of an advanced player at sweeping.

Recently I have been doing research and hearing alot of people saying that if you don't occasionally use a metronome while practising sweep picking, shredding even just playing regular then you will be a sloppy guitarist. I have watched multiple videos but can't seem to get the hang of playing with a metronome or even understand how it works.

Any tips, or scales that I can play with the metronome along with the BPM I should start at ? and is it really a necessity to guitar playing ?

Thanks.


Try jamming to backing tracks on youtube. its the same thing.
#12
i'm pretty good at sweeping, just not in time

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#13
I find that its a bit hard for some people to understand how a metronome works is because they often cant hear the metronome while playing. and sometimes when they do hear it, its annoying. I never liked using common annoying tick metronomes. I always preffered using the actual song Im trying to learn, or making up a riff quickly using ezdrummer and reaper.

with time you develope sort of a mental metronome which you unconsciously use to play at different timings(like tapping your foot).

its one thing to learn how to sweep fast. but its a whole other thing to do those same sweeps at different timings for a section of a song. thats why a metronome would be helpful. it isnt really necessary to use one since alot of people unconsciously develope that mental metronome, but it helps alot.
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#14
It's worth noting that, while beethoven did leave metronome markings for his music, he rejected them later in his career. That's to say, maybe a metronome isn't the best musical tool in the world. I'm not necessarily against them but I wouldn't become attached. I hardly ever use a metronome these days, but I did use it early on in my playing.

EDIT --> Ideally, eventually you wont really need one. I know some very good musicians who actually swear by its use though.
Last edited by Erc at Jun 7, 2013,
#15
Quote by Erc
It's worth noting that, while beethoven did leave metronome markings for his music, he rejected them later in his career. That's to say, maybe a metronome isn't the best musical tool in the world. I'm not necessarily against them but I wouldn't become attached. I hardly ever use a metronome these days, but I did use it early on in my playing.

EDIT --> Ideally, eventually you wont really need one. I know some very good musicians who actually swear by its use though.


You're proposing that being able to play in time is unimportant because Beethoven didn't care what tempo was used for his music?
#16
I didn't say that. In more advanced forms of music (jazz, classical) a lot of rubato or swing is used which makes a metronome practice not particularly ideal.

EDIT --> and i don't think perfect straight time is all that aesthetically pleasing.

You can listen to something like this scriabin etude and this rachmaninoff concerto (played both by their respective composers) and hear their tempo being all over the place

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=VK2uTtuI84w

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=x8l37utZxMQ
Last edited by Erc at Jun 7, 2013,
#17
Being off tempo is fine, and even more emotive, when there's only one person playing.

As for the second clip, the instrumentalists are all still in time with each other regardless of the inconsistent tempo. Playing with a metronome is only partially about being able to keep a steady tempo. I would argue that its more so about being able to keep time with other people, which the players in that video are clearly pros at doing.
#18
well maybe in that case, but 99.xx% of other music follows some time signature.
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#19
Quote by Macabre_Turtle
Being off tempo is fine, and even more emotive, when there's only one person playing.


I don't mean to be rude, but the only time I've ever heard someone playing electric guitar without a backing and sweep-picking at an inconsistent tempo was in a guitar shop on a Saturday.
#20
You could also use a drum machine/backing track. It's pretty much the same thing. But being able to play with a metronome is a good skill if you want to record your playing. Because sometimes there are no other parts behind your guitar part or you need to start the song with a guitar riff or something.

You don't need to practice with metronome all the time to be accurate. But metronome is good at showing if you really can play in time or just think you can play accurately but actually are sloppy.

I would try it. But if you find playing with metronome and keeping time easy and don't like using it, don't use it.
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