#1
Hey UG im buying a shure sm57 and im just wondering what cables i need to plug it into a computer. Also should i use a pre amp or just software for this?
#2
You need an interface, a USB for said interface, and an XLR cable to connect the mic to the interface.
#4
Oh, and in general, an interface functions as a pre-amp. If you plugged a mic straight to your sound-card (unless you had a special one for instruments) it would sound like shit and the shear-stress of an instrument cable would wreck the jack and, by extension, your computer.

If you have some sort of effects unit the specifically states it is safe for a computer via auxilary cable then you're safe to plug it in to your computer (not all interfaces use usb). In that case do not use your mic-jack. Use the direct-in since your effects unit is already providing the pre-amp.
#6
I guess it would work, kinda. Probably be shit though. Especially if you want to be able to monitor what's coming through, that's going to have latencies (delay/lag) through the roof.
#8
Go read the Interfaces sticky.
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#11
Quote by joel-lesperance
Going to record classical guitar and may be mic an electric amp later
Like chatterbox said, get an interface. I'd add to get one that has direct monitoring and, for classical guitar, two channels so you can record in stereo. SM57?... Great thing about the sm57 is that it works pretty well on anything, and it can sound nice on classical guitar. For classical gtr though it's not going to get a very detailed sound. For that you might want to consider condenser mics. Look at Naiant (nice on gtr, very little $). Classical gtr is a relatively quiet source and the 57 is at its best IME on loud sources like amps and snares. But it all depends on the type of sound you're looking for. Best of luck with it.
#12
Quote by joel-lesperance
Going to record classical guitar and may be mic an electric amp later

Pretty awful choice for classical guitar, to be honest.

An SM57 will do the job, and can sometimes be great - the natural emphasis on upper mids and reduction of extreme high/low frequencies help it sit well in a dense rock mix.

However, since classical guitar is usually played solo, you really want a good condenser to capture as much of the natural sound and expression as possible.
#13
Quote by kyle62
Pretty awful choice for classical guitar, to be honest.

An SM57 will do the job, and can sometimes be great - the natural emphasis on upper mids and reduction of extreme high/low frequencies help it sit well in a dense rock mix.

However, since classical guitar is usually played solo, you really want a good condenser to capture as much of the natural sound and expression as possible.


Ok thanks man do you have any recommendations? Also it will be 2 microphones recording classical guitar duets.