#2
What are you working with? Give us as much info as you can, then we can give specific tips.

Universal Advice:

-Tune the drums
-Performance > equipment
-Use a click track if tracking instruments separately
-Seriously, tune the drums
-Make sure the band is well-rehearsed
-Did you tune the drums? Tune them.

Pretty much everything else is subjective.
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#4
Do not underestimate tuning the drums. You can get a contraption called a "tunebot" that basically functions like a guitar tuner for drums.

Click track+headphones. IMPORTANT! Also scratch guitar tracks are helpful.

Watch phase cancellation on overheads.
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Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#5
Quote by Sid McCall

-Tune the drums
-Performance > equipment
...
-Seriously, tune the drums
...
-Did you tune the drums? Tune them.


Quote by oneblackened
Do not underestimate tuning the drums.


Quote by kyle62
The drummer, tuning...


^ This.

Because even with well over $1000 worth of mics into some really good preamps, if they're not tuned, you'll still be stuck with something like this:

http://www.greenroomrecording.now-here-this.com/baddrums.mp3

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#6
Try different recording techniques!
Place the mics where they sound best to you.

Also, having good sounding microphones will not make bad sounding drums sound good.
Opposed to what Chris posted (nice demo XP), here it is an example of what you can do with $150 of overheads microphones and an SM57, if your drums sound good.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUpNNlE93ik
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#7
I post this a lot, but in the same vein as the previous post, check this out:
http://record.apogeedigital.com/how-tos/recording-drums-with-two-microphones/

Obviously he's a world-class engineer, and he uses mics that cost 5 figures+ in the first example, but there's a clip with two relatively cheap mics (under $300 or so?) that sounds amazing. It's all about the source material, and the room is a big factor too.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#8
Quote by Spambot_2
Try different recording techniques!
Place the mics where they sound best to you.

Also, having good sounding microphones will not make bad sounding drums sound good.
Opposed to what Chris posted (nice demo XP), here it is an example of what you can do with $150 of overheads microphones and an SM57, if your drums sound good.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hUpNNlE93ik


I'm diggin' that snare
But the kick needs its own mic if you're going to use it in a mix.
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#9
If you're looking for that fat modern sound, pick up something like Drumagog or Slate Digital's Trigger and layer some drum samples in behind them. Its not too uncommon to hear multiple snares layered behind each other.

Also, tune your ****ing drums
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#10
I'm not sure if this has been mentioned yet, but make sure the drums are tuned.

Also, once you tune the drums, make sure you tune the drums

As for micing, it's all up to what you're going for with sound, man.

Your best bet is to play around and see what you like with the mics you have. If you can't get a sound you like with the setup you currently have, add to your mic collection AFTER EXHAUSTING EVERY SINGLE mic configuration and technique. Be sure you need to spend the cash.

I've heard great tones come out of 2 overheads and a single sm57.

The room, as mentioned, is HUGE to the sound also.

If you're in a concrete room with $1,000,000,000 worth of gear, you'll still sound like you're in a concrete room. Treat that place, and treat it right
"Then I just had a cage full of mice."
#11
Quote by OfCourseNot
I'm diggin' that snare
But the kick needs its own mic if you're going to use it in a mix.


The SM57 is used as kick mic there.

I guess it just need a bit of EQ :P
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#12
^ or something other than a 57 on it...

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#13
57+ subkick actually works pretty well believe it or not.
Current Gear:
LTD MH-400
PRS SE Custom 24 (Suhr SSH+/SSV)
Ibanez RG3120 Prestige (Dimarzio Titans)
Squier Vintage Modified 70s Jazz V
Audient iD22 interface
Peavey Revalver 4, UAD Friedman BE100/DS40
Adam S3A monitors
Quote by Anonden
You CAN play anything with anything....but some guitars sound right for some things, and not for others. Single coils sound retarded for metal, though those who are apeshit about harpsichord probably beg to differ.
#14
By subkick, do you mean a speaker wired in reverse?

Like this....



If that's the case, then that's kinda like saying that a Hyundai Elantra makes a pretty wicked race car when you drop a Jaguar V12 in it, no?

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#15
I think he's saying if you combine a 57 and the subkick (I think he meant the 'official' yamaha product) then you get a good sound.

While that's probably true, you can still achieve the same general sound with a dedicated kick mic.
Telecaster - SG - Jaguar
Princeton Reverb, Extra Reverb
P-Bass - Mustang Bass
Apogee Duet 2 - Ableton Suite
#16
I want to try that speaker wired in reverse idea. Combine that with an e602, and it might be pretty awesome.

CT
Could I get some more talent in the monitors, please?

I know it sounds crazy, but try to learn to inhale your voice. www.thebelcantotechnique.com

Chris is the king of relating music things to other objects in real life.
#17
When it comes to subkicks, the ultimate lazy man's route is to stick a guitar combo or PA speaker in front of the bass drum and then twist a pair of wires round the input terminals.

If you've got a separate guitar cab you can literally just plug a 1/4" jack from the cab's input to your desk/interface.
#18
Quote by axemanchris
^ or something other than a 57 on it...

CT

It's a 57, it's written in the video description :P

Quote by kyle62

When it comes to subkicks, the ultimate lazy man's route is to stick a guitar combo or PA speaker in front of the bass drum and then twist a pair of wires round the input terminals.

If you've got a separate guitar cab you can literally just plug a 1/4" jack from the cab's input to your desk/interface.

CT

It does work that simply?
Geez I gotta try that haha
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#19
I'd add that a room mic (LDC thrown up a few metres, minimum, away from the kit) can add a lot of depth and glue to the sound, when sat right in mix - something I recently realised even helps with metal.

Oh, and spend time getting your overheads right - if you mess up the placement of the overheads, the whole kit sounds off-centre and there's less definition to the cymbals and any of the snare/toms you allow into them.

Edit: Also, don't do what you think you should be doing... do what works best, working with what you have available. If you only have a few/limited inputs, start with your OH's and then bolster the sound bit by bit, adding the next most important thing (usually a kick mic, then a snare mic, then tom mics etc.).
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