#1
Ok, so it all started when I saw a video on Youtube The guitar had the same pickups as my guitar, the EMG 81/60. It also had the same body wood was mine, mahogany. The sustain their guitar had was unbelievable They hit a note on about the 15th-17th fret on the B string and it rang out for about 20 seconds with no almost no sign of it ending When I do the same on my Dean V79 it only lasts for maybe 6 seconds before it starts to fade down. I am trying to figure out why I have so little sustain. My bridge pickup (81) is level with the neck and the neck pickup (60) is just below level. My string height is about 3mm on either side. Maybe 3.5 on the bass side (I know my action is high/very high). So, could ya help me out? Am I just asking to much or is it actually bad?
#3
I would bet that your problem lies in the way that guitar is designed.More specifically,the way the strings run through the body.I've heard that Dean V's don't get very good pinch harmonics either.You might look into some hardware upgrades (bridge,nut,tuners,etc.),you might find a cheap fix.I had the same issue with my guitar.I put a big brass block on the floyd rose.Major improvement.
#4
Raise your action. Having action that is too low kills sustain.
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#5
Try cranking the volume as someone already said. If that doesn't work, here's an idea; If you got an overdrive pedal try putting it at the front of your setup, you can use it to add a ton of sustain. I use an SD-1 with a DS-1, just get the knobs right so that the tone sounds identical with the overdrive on/off. Soon as you switch on the overdrive, your 10 second sustain turns into 40.
#7
Provided you have new strings and a decent setup the guitar's pretty incidental, what matters far more is whatever the guitar was plugged into, how it was EQ'd and how loud it was.
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#8
All the little things add up... but Volume is a huge factor.

If you're playing loud enough for your pickups to pick up the sound waves from your speakers, that's when you're going to get your endless harmonic sustain. If you're not... you're going to have a tough time, as you're relying entirely on the gear you're using.
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#9
why on earth would you want to play a note that sustains for 20 seconds? If I wanted to do that, I'd take up the violin
#10
Jimmy Paige in "It Might Get Loud" talked about using a distortion pedal for sustain.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=M6hwU-jP4kI

Volume and gain. The replies with volume and using a distortion pedal are right on the money. I have 81/85 emgs and they work great. VOLUME AND GAIN CRANK IT UP! Headphones can keep you from getting evicted.

If I want a pounding chug and hammering power cords I have to overdrive the heck out of it, and push the amp. The emgs will also help overdrive the amp to, push over the distortion threshold, guitar volume!

Good luck.

EDIT- put the distortion pedal in front of the amp, not in the effects loop. Have fun playing around with it!
Last edited by Chevywizz at Jun 7, 2013,
#11
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
Raise your action. Having action that is too low kills sustain.
I was tolled that anything higher then 3mm is high action for an electric


Thanks for all the replies everyone I"ll try more volume and see how it does Are there any other tips for more sustain other then more volume?
Last edited by BMX_328 at Jun 7, 2013,
#12
Quote by mrbreeze317
why on earth would you want to play a note that sustains for 20 seconds? If I wanted to do that, I'd take up the violin


One thing is reallllllllllly slow bends with a load of vibrato. Makes for some wicked ambient/psychedelic noise.
#13
I'm sure your problem lies with your amp and how loud you are playing. What amp are you running through?
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#14
Quote by BMX_328
I was tolled that anything higher then 3mm is high action for an electric

It depends on which fret. If you're talking about the 12th fret, then yeah. That's a lot higher than I would ever use. But it is a fact that having your action too low will affect sustain significanty.
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#16
Quote by T00DEEPBLUE
It depends on which fret. If you're talking about the 12th fret, then yeah. That's a lot higher than I would ever use. But it is a fact that having your action too low will affect sustain significanty.
I just checked, its 3mm at the 12th fret. It doesn't really bother me tho
#17
Quote by desperatechris
Turn up youre volum and raise youre strings
My strings are already high and I run 0.11s in standard tune. They don't need to be any higher