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#1
I just finished reading Lord of the Flies for my English class and loved it. I like the in depth take on human nature.

So what other similar books do you recommend? I've already got 1984 on my list, Anything else that might be good?

EDIT: Alright, Let m,e be a bit more specific, I guess.

I'm 16 but have a huge appreciation for classic literature (as in I'm currently reading Prometheus Bound/Seven Against Thebes, with Don Quixote on the list). I'm already hooked on LOTR, haven't finished Two towers yet. Already read;

>Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy series
>Animal Farm
>Catcher in the Rye (2nd worst book I've ever read)
>Night (worst book I've ever read)
>Lord of the Flies (might be best book I've ever read)
>Julius Caesar
>Fellowship of the Ring
>The Hobbit
>Eragon series
>Three Theban Plays

Already on my list;

>1984
>The other 2 LOTR books
>Flatland
>Prometheus Bound/Seven Against Thebes
>King Lear
>Don Quixote
>Call of Cthulhu

If that clears things up, glad I could.
Last edited by gateway01 at Jun 10, 2013,
#2
It's over simplified, So what!

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#3
The Cement Garden by Ian McEwan. It's quite heavily inspired by Lord of the Flies, although the story is only passingly similar.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#4
Everything not by Stephanie Meyer. The Necronomicon's a good read if you can understand the complex narratives of some of the stories.
#5
Quote by Dæmönika
Everything not by Stephanie Meyer. The Necronomicon's a good read if you can understand the complex narratives of some of the stories.


The Necronomicon isn't a novel. Oh and,

> Lovecraft
> Complex narrative

Pick one.
...Stapling helium to penguins since 1949.
#6
Siddhartha by Herman Hesse and The Old Man and the Sea by Hemingway are the two best books ever written.
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#7
read The Shining by Stephen King

book is amazing, realsies
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#8
The literature/relatively good book thread is also a very good read
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#12
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A Song of Ice and Fire series (aka Game of Thrones)

I second this.

It's not as heavy as lord of the rings but there is excellent character dynamics. Plus, addictive as hell. New generation lotr.

I recommend Animal Farm. The ending gave me goose bumps.

King's 11/22/63 is my all time favourite. Every book I read is compared to this one.
#14
Anything but Catcher in the Rye because fück that whiny cünt
___

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#16
Animal Farm, Of Mice and Men, 1984, World War Z, Fahrenheit 451..all about dystopia and/or really make you think about human nature
#17
To quite a post I made in the book thread, which quoted a post from elsewhere:

I made a short booklist for a teen school library yesterday that I thought people might be interested in here, especially if you're looking for some summer reading:

Carl Sagan: The Demon Haunted World (major part of the inspiration that led to me studying science)

Ben Goldacre: Bad Science (excellent book for having teens understand the importance and practise of science)

Richard Rhodes: The Making of the Atomic Bomb (excellent and thorough examination of the process of discovery that led to the A-Bomb, and Nuclear Physics generally)

Richard Feynman: Surely You're Joking, Mr. Feynman! (Simply hilarious)

Bill Bryson: A Short History of Nearly Everything (Excellent Science journalism, shows the human side of the process of discovery)

Matt Ridley: Genome (Great book that teaches about DNA while simultaneously debunking many of the misconceptions surrounding heredity)

Richard Dawkins: The Selfish Gene (The reason Dawkins actually matters, proper explanation of the gene centered view of natural selection)

Edwin A. Abbott: Flatland (Because geometry can be interesting, it just needs to be presented right)

Steven Pinker: How the Mind Works (An exploration of Cognitive science from the only literate linguist ever)
Then, on a less "pop sci" bent, just non-fiction that's good for teens to read:

Viktor Frankl: Man's Search for Meaning (Psychology and the Holocaust from a survivor's perspective)

Robert M. Pirsig: Zen and the Art of Motorcycle Maintenance (Transformative for a lot of College students, but would probably be better read in our system earlier than that. Also shows wonderfully the importance of inspiration in the Philosophy of Science)

Michael Pollan: The Omnivore's Dilemma (Great for Ag Science students, but also just a great read for anyone who needs to eat food in order to survive)

Jared Diamond: Guns, Germs, and Steel (Sciencey history at its best, the kind of sweeping stuff and basic questions that school curricula never even ask, much less answer)

Malcolm Gladwell: Outliers (What makes great people successful [the answer is grasping opportunities], important reading for all kids but especially high achievers. Gladwell's catalogue should be on the shelf, but if you can only get one this is the best for teens)

Steven Pinker: The Blank Slate (Science, History, and Politics all worked into a book that challenges assumptions and deeply held prejudices; important in a society that will only become more globalised)

Antony Beevor: Stalingrad (Beevor's whole catalogue should be there, but if you can only have one then Stalingrad should be it, a powerful exploration of the worst siege in history, fascinating reading for those wishing to study history)

Tim Harford: The Undercover Economist (A fun exploration of what economics means and what we can learn from it)

Steven D. Levitt: Freakonomics (Similar to the above, but more focused on microeconomics; might get some kids interested in it as a CAO choice)
"Why should we subsidise intellectual curiosity?"
-Ronald Reagan

"Knowledge is in every country the surest basis of public happiness."
-George Washington
#19
Animal Farm and 1984 were utter shit (although 1984 was infinitely better). I think it's just simpler to avoid Orwell.
#21
The Silmarillion - one of Tolkien's less well known books, but in my opinion one of his best.

The usual, Brave new world. Time's Arrow - Martin Amis is pretty good, confusing at times, but quality.

And I can't recommend A Song of Ice and Fire enough - but be warned you'll get hooked, and they're long and numerous; you might be on it alone for a while.
#23
Quote by Avedas
Animal Farm and 1984 were utter shit (although 1984 was infinitely better). I think it's just simpler to avoid Orwell.

I feel obligated to say this is nonsense.

However his essays and polemics are much better.
#24
Quote by Todd Hart
The Necronomicon isn't a novel. Oh and,

> Lovecraft
> Complex narrative

Pick one.

I love Lovecraft but this is true.


The Hunger Games is very accessible and dystopian. Battle Royale is the more hardcore version of it. Across the Universe isn't so bad.

Lord of the Flies is often given to young adult readers, look at the Young Adult section in bookstores or online.
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#25
My favourite novels (although I haven't read many) are The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-time by Mark Haddon and The Liar by Stephen Fry.

The Liar is full of witty humour.
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#26
Quote by Avedas
Animal Farm and 1984 were utter shit (although 1984 was infinitely better). I think it's just simpler to avoid Orwell.


Avedas, y u do dis?
#27
Quote by willT08
I feel obligated to say this is nonsense.

However his essays and polemics are much better.

The books I mentioned were absolute drivel and the political/moral comparisons felt completely forced and at times, tedious. Of course people will disagree with me, but that's how I viewed it.
#28
I always liked Terry Goodkind's Sword of Truth series.

And by all means, avoid the show they started making based on the books because it is utter shit and will completely ruin the books.
#30
The Wonderful Wizard of Oz.
Tomorrow will take us away
Far from home
No one will ever know our names
But the bards' songs will remain
Tomorrow will take it away
The fear of today
It will be gone
Due to our magic songs

ALL HAIL CELESTIA
#31
If you like dark and dystopic, then I recommend Watchmen. It's a graphic novel written by the same guy who wrote V for Vendetta. Both are excellent and very dark. I really enjoyed them. Otherwise 1984 and Animal Farm by Orwell are great and so is Fahrenheit 451 (or anything by Ray Bradbury for that matter).
#33
A few of my favorites (read: juvenile level favorites of a 21 year old manchild) are:

Animal Farm and 1984 by George Orwell
LOTR, and the Children of Hurin by Tolkien
The Wheel of Time series by Robert Jordan
Just about any book by Isaac Asimov
Fahrenheit 451 by Ray Bradbury
and my personal favorite, Stranger in a Strange Land by Robert Heinlein.
#34
One Hundred Years of Solitude (GGM)
The Martian Chronicles (Bradbury)
Loitering with Intent (Spark)
Franny and Zooey (Salinger)
The Adventures of Sally (Wodehouse)
NW (Smith)


those are some books I like. there are more but I don't feel like making a proper list right now.

it's ok if you don't like any of them
cat
#35
Infinite Jest by David Foster Wallace is a great read
A personal favorite of mine is The Cash Cage by Corey Deitz
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#36
"OP's Mom in the Flesh" by Every Guy in the Neighborhood
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#37
The first four books of the Dark Tower series by Stephen King (the last three are terrible)
Sherlock Holmes (in particular The Hound Of The Baskervilles)
the John Carter of Mars series is a fun read but it's not exactly deep
Philip K. Dick has some great short stories
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#38
Jonathan Swift - Travels into Several Remote Nations of the World, in Four Parts. By Lemuel Gulliver, First a Surgeon, and then a Captain of Several Ships

Dante Alighieri - Divine Comedy
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#39
Quote by Avedas
The books I mentioned were absolute drivel and the political/moral comparisons felt completely forced and at times, tedious. Of course people will disagree with me, but that's how I viewed it.

Some people just don't like Orwell. Nothing wrong with disliking a writer. I hate a lot of really famous people. They're still brilliant writers, I just hate reading it.
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Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

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brot pls
#40
Check out Little Brother and Homeland Security by Cory Doctrow. You can read both books for free off his website craphound.com

Highly recommend these if you into privacy/freedom/digital rights/latest technology etc.. Sort of serves as a part manual, as well as a novel.
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