#1
Ok guys, Im a newbie and still learning. I like the body style and the feel of a Strat, its comfortable for me and in my limited experience, easier for me to play; but I prefer the tone of a Les Paul. In my research I understand its a Wood type and the Humbucker pickups that make the difference. My question is, What is a good make or model of a guitar, where I can get the best of both worlds? There are so many guitar makers out there a suggestion from seasoned musicians is what I would prefer. (Been looking at maybe dropping in some S.D. Hotrails in the bridge and neck positions in my Start but I'm unsure of the results would be. I live on a tight budget and don't want to waist my money on a bad result).
#2
PRS is about the best "middle" ground between an LP and a Strat that I have found. It is actually why the PRS is made the way it is to be the best of both.
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#3
@ Robbgnarly, I really like PRS, Thanks for the suggestion I'll really have to look into those closer now!
#4
No problems. I had a Gibson LP Studio for several years and I really liked it, but it was pretty heavy. I bought my PRS 3-4 yrs after the Gibson and I ended up selling the LP. The PRS is just more comfortable to play IMO and it does have some weight to it, it is nothing like my LP was.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#5
Yeah, your best options are a PRS 22/24 (be it SE or American, Custom or CE) or some kind of mahogany bodied, maple topped H/H, H/S/S or H/S/H strat.
#6
if you're going down the road of a PRS (which I hate for a number of reasons) be sure to try a Suhr Moderne. IMO, and having owned a PRS and a Suhr, the Suhr craps all over the PRS in every aspect. Just my view.
#7
If you can handle a carved top body check out the C-1 from Schecter, which is a hybrid of the Strat and Les Paul designs. It’s available in three scale lengths, two neck styles, numerous finishes, and in a very wide range of prices. Also check out various Les Paul Special style guitars, which have the shape and scale of a Les Paul with the flat top of a Strat. An Epiphone Les Paul Special II sells for $129 new, is often on sale for $89, and can be found used for peanuts.
#8
Quote by jakey333
if you're going down the road of a PRS (which I hate for a number of reasons) be sure to try a Suhr Moderne. IMO, and having owned a PRS and a Suhr, the Suhr craps all over the PRS in every aspect. Just my view.

Suhr are great guitars but are deff more of a strat feel and tone.

What did you dislike about PRS? I know not every one likes every guitar, but I have always found PRS to be an exceptional guitar.
2002 PRS CE22
2013 G&L ASAT Deluxe
2009 Epiphone G-400 (SH-4)
Marshall JCM2000 DSL100
Krank 1980 Jr 20watt
Krank Rev 4x12 (eminence V12)
GFS Greenie/Digitech Bad Monkey
Morley Bad Horsie 2
MXR Smart Gate
#9
Quote by Robbgnarly
Suhr are great guitars but are deff more of a strat feel and tone.

What did you dislike about PRS? I know not every one likes every guitar, but I have always found PRS to be an exceptional guitar.

+3.1415

A Suhr Modern will be closer to a Strat than to a Gibson, while a PRS would suit TS's needs much better.
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#10
They don't actually look like Strats, but you might want to give Reverend guitars a try.

Bolt-on or set-neck, they feature korina bodies, a bass contour control (same idea as tone control, but for bass) and unique quasi-retro styling. All in all, a nice combination of ergonomics and tones.
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#11
I've checked out the Suhr Modern online, truth be told, I've never heard of them until now. They are some nice looking guitars!! I live in Germany and I'll have to find a dealer for a try out.
@Linkerman
@Jakey333

Going try try out a PRS SE Custom 24 GBQ LTD on Tuesday. We have a dealer near me and has one for €750. @ Robbgnarley
#12
I wouldn't say its the wood that makes a big difference, its the scale length then the pickups that order (IMO) that make the difference. Like said above, you can find strat style guitars in any number of scales and as long as its routed for humbuckers, you're fine. Just make sure to stay away from single coils
#13
I like the LTDs by ESP. The more you spend the better the guitar.....i know but had to say it. The Schecters are good too for the price (C-1 and Hell-raisers are really great guitars).

Strat style with humbuckers. Many are mahogany, jumbo frets and great necks for a great price. Own two, F-50 and a MH-400.

My Gibson Les Paul kicks butt.......

The PRS look great too, but I have not played them.

Good Luck!
#15
They're such different guitars, the LP and the Strat. I agree with the PRS. Or maybe a ESP Ltd? Surely between those two there's gotta be something for your budget.

Depending on where you are I'd also suggest checking out some lesser known brands. There's a few good online stores for this sort of thing - maybe shoot them an email with your query.
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#16
You might want to check out the Fernandes line, especially the Dragonfly.
http://www.fernandesguitars.com/dragonfly.html

The Godin Redline HB might work.
http://godinguitars.com/godinredlinehbp.htm

Consider the Reverend Kingbolt or Bayonet.
http://www.reverendguitars.com/instrument/kingbolt-ra-fm/
http://www.reverendguitars.com/instrument/bayonet-w/
Sturgeon's 2nd Law, a.k.a. Sturgeon's Revelation: “Ninety percent of everything is crap.”

Why, yes, I am a lawyer- thanks for asking!

Log off and play yer guitar!

Strap on, tune up, rock out!
Last edited by dannyalcatraz at Jun 10, 2013,
#17
The actual physicality of the guitar matters much, much less than the pickups you're using, the amp you're playing through, and you playing style.

I've always said this and i stand by it: Get the guitar that is most comfortable in your hands. Don't even plug it in. Get what works for you on a physical level. Then plug it in, assess it's sound, and adjust your gear or your pickups to get the tone you want.

There are dozens and dozens, if not hundreds of aftermarket pickups available. There is absolutely no reason to limit yourself, or to judge a guitar's sound based on an arbitrary assortment of "stock" pickups that get put into guitars on the shelf.


The "Les Paul Sound" isn't nearly as iconic as the sound of the players who happen to use Les Pauls.
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Last edited by Offworld92 at Jun 10, 2013,
#18
Choose the PRS, Ibanez or LTD you like in your price range. As I said I like the ESP/LTDs, but get something you will enjoy playing. As you get better tone will become more important. If you look at the thread about "your first guitar" you will see most of us when through several steps.

The most important thing is you like the guitar and enjoy playing it.

HAVE FUN!
#19
Quote by Offworld92
The actual physicality of the guitar matters much, much less than the pickups you're using, the amp you're playing through, and you playing style.

I've always said this and i stand by it: Get the guitar that is most comfortable in your hands. Don't even plug it in. Get what works for you on a physical level. Then plug it in, assess it's sound, and adjust your gear or your pickups to get the tone you want.


This is probably the best guitar buying advice you'll ever recieve, all my +1s to you, good sir.
#21
Quote by ExDementia
Bam.

/thread


Pretty much what I was thinking, a lot of the Original Les Paul music with Mary Ford was really clean and slightly thin sounding probably due to recording techniques available at the time.
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