#1
Should i be setting my preamp volume when recording guitars/bass direct in? I get a decent signal with the preamp gain at 0 so should i even bother with the preamps? I have a Presonus Firepod as an interface/preamp.

Is this because im using active EMGS/Bartolinis?

Whats your usual protocol for going direct?

Thanks in advance!
(signature removed, please choose another)
#2
If you have sufficient signal without using your pre then yea dont worry about it. If you are using a special kind of pre having the gain at 0 typically does nothing in which case i would see if your di box has a pad and then set your pre gain accordingly
#3
When DI'ing passive guitars, I'll go through a fairly transparent pre.
For active pickups (in my case, my Ibanez BTB), I'll run straight into a line input. I don't fancy the results I get when I have the BTB running through a compressed pre.
DARK_MATTER, Instrumental Post-Metal from Ireland


Bass:
Ibanez BTB 405QM
Ashdown PM600 - Peavey TVX 4x10
Russian Big Muff

Guitar:
Fender Jim Root sig
'99 Stagemaster 7-string
Yamaha F310
Hughes & Kettner Warp 7 w/4x12
#4
It depends. It's better to record high volume audio if you can, but your pres could suck just like mine, so turn the gain up only if your pres sound good.
Actually, if your pres are good, the sound will probably be affected in a good way - a bit of added harmonics, a very little bit of distortion, the "analogue warmth" that everybody talk about XP
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#5
So its better to record them loud and then mix them with the faders?
(signature removed, please choose another)
#6
With digital, entry level gear (like I assume you have) it doesn't matter. TBH I would record at lower volumes for headroom then bring it all up in mastering.
#7
Quote by player o slayer
So its better to record them loud and then mix them with the faders?

Yes, as long as you don't run into clipping.

In that case, just lower the volume of your signal until the loudest thing played when recording comes close to clipping, but doesn't.

This way you'll have a signal which doesn't need to be raised in volume, which is more convenient if you have not-really-good ways of raising it, like really cheap amps.
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.
#8
It's a few days late but DO NOT record "as hot as possible without clipping".

Here's why:
http://www.massivemastering.com/blog/index_files/Proper_Audio_Recording_Levels.php

TL;DR: I really don't want to sum up the article, just don't record too hot. Keep it peaking at -12dB ish.
Quote by WCPhils
According to that chart, women like men with a Pringle canister down there.
Michael Kelly Patriot Glory
Ibanez RG8
Blackstar HT 20 w/ Jet City cab
whole bunch o' pedals
#9
That article explains the result you want to obtain, but it explains a very simplistic way to do that.

You don't want your mixes to be overcompressed (what marketing decided to call "loudness war", a war where the goal is to make your records as loud as possible.

That's a good thing, you don't want your audio tracks to be quiet, you want them as loud as you can.
But more important than loudness is the dynamic range, which is the difference in volume between the most loud and the less loud thing in your mix.

Overcompressing makes audio less dynamic, so you can raise its volume without clipping.

The actual results, in my experience, are muddy tracks in which you can hardly hear the voice.
Here's an article on the loudness war if you're interested in getting to now that a bit more.)

But the way not to make them overcompressed, resulting then in muddy tracks,
isn't recording quietly.

For clarity sake, "record as hot as possible without clipping" doesn't mean you should play something that rarely clips, or that you should try to play everything at the same volume level not to make it clip.

Keep an eye on the faders, and play as loud as you can.
Strum really hard your guitar, scream like your life depends on that, beat the snare drum lite it was your ex-girlfriend and stuff like that.

Then, turn the volume down so that even the loudest thing you can play (that you can play, not that you will play) doesn't make anything clip.

Then mix the audio as you feel like.

The only non-written (but actually written, in the last few years) would be to keep a good dynamic range, even sacrificing volume.

People can most likely raise the volume of their speakers, but only you can prevent them from hearing something bad. (wow I'm sooo deep :P)
Name's Luca.

Quote by OliOsbourne
I don't know anything about this topic, but I just clicked on this thread because of your username :O
Quote by Cajundaddy
Clue: amplifiers amplify so don't turn it on if you need quiet.
Quote by chrismendiola
I guess spambots are now capable of reading minds.