#1
I was wondering, I'm getting a Squier Fretless Vintage Modified J-Bass. They say the neck is Ebanol, so it is durable enough to take roundwound. Is it worth the risk? Also, any advice for flatwound? In that, advice for somebody new to flatwound.
Quote by mcraddict81592
Since when do we do deep and meaningful? You can't just switch between random quirky fun and deep and heartfelt shit, we aren't the Breakfast Club, man.

Quote by CL/\SH
Although, my approval doesn't mean shit


RUSH IS VARIETY!
#2
There isn't any "risk" when using roundwounds on a fretless, unless you slap like crazy. If you do, you could chip the edge of the fingerboard where it meets the body of the bass. Ebanol is the same stuff that they use to make those plain, black bowling balls, so it is pretty tough stuff. You should be just fine. As for what flats to try, a lot of people like D'Addario Chromes. Rotosound Jazz flats are very good, but not always easy to find.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#3
Quote by FatalGear41
There isn't any "risk" when using roundwounds on a fretless, unless you slap like crazy. If you do, you could chip the edge of the fingerboard where it meets the body of the bass.

I have to disagree, roundwound strings dig into a rosewood fingerboard pretty badly so you lose sustain and tone pretty quickly as they're being muted by the wood itself. This isn't the case for finished boards, maple and ebony, etc, but a lot of fretlesses come as unfinished rosewood.

I play flats on my fretless, Ernie Ball Chromes, but my fingerboard is rosewood. If you have something more durable I'd recommend flats simply because ebanol is easily scratched (my Squier Deluxe V went foggy in two weeks). Nickel and chrome flats are great but avoid steel ones like the plague, they're stiff and horroble to play.
#4
Quote by Spaz91
If you have something more durable I'd recommend flats simply because ebanol is easily scratched (my Squier Deluxe V went foggy in two weeks).

+1. You're not as likely to actually severely gouge the fretboard with ebanol, but it won't take long to scuff or scratch it up.
Composite Aficionado


Spector and Markbass
#5
Quote by Spaz91
I have to disagree, roundwound strings dig into a rosewood fingerboard pretty badly so you lose sustain and tone pretty quickly as they're being muted by the wood itself. This isn't the case for finished boards, maple and ebony, etc, but a lot of fretlesses come as unfinished rosewood.


I've had nothing but GHS roundwounds on my fretless Laguna 4-string, and it has an unfinished rosewood fingerboard (a very nice one, too). The bass is at least five years old and the thing looks brand new, except for the cheap-assed knobs it came with.

Even with flatwounds, unless you get tapewound flats, you will be playing metal strings, which are harder than any rosewood board. I wouldn't worry about scratches; they're part and parcel of normal bass wear-and-tear.
"Maybe this world is another planet's hell?" - Aldous Huxley
#6
Quote by FatalGear41
I've had nothing but GHS roundwounds on my fretless Laguna 4-string, and it has an unfinished rosewood fingerboard (a very nice one, too). The bass is at least five years old and the thing looks brand new, except for the cheap-assed knobs it came with.

.


You must be gentle with the strings, because my pau ferro fretboard had grooves from when the previous owner used roundwounds on it. I was able to get them gentle sanded out, but it has made me cautious about using rounds.

I would avoid the Roto tapewounds--I've had nothing but issues with the wraps twisting and then rattling after a few months of play. I've switched to Thomastik flats and like them better than the Roto 77s.