#1
Hello,

I write and record my own songs, guitar and vocal only. The bass is synthesised. I've been getting more interested in writing for bass and want a real one.

My question is, for home recording purposes only, can I play a bass through my guitar amp (40W Roland Cube)?
#2
The actual amp is fine, but the speaker wont really appreciate it as they can be damaged.
I am sure you wont have any problems unless you crank it up some though, but I wouldn't recommend it.
I would however recommend getting an audio interface and just going direct in with your bass for starters at least. There are several amp plugins if you want to use that, but I often get great results with my bass straight into the interface.
Things with strings:
Ibanez J.Custom, Prestiges, RG8, SR5 bass etc
LP's, Strat, Tele
Noiseboxes:
ENGL Retro Tube 50
5150 III 50W
Orange Terror Bass
#3
Quote by Shor
The actual amp is fine, but the speaker wont really appreciate it as they can be damaged.
I am sure you wont have any problems unless you crank it up some though, but I wouldn't recommend it.
I would however recommend getting an audio interface and just going direct in with your bass for starters at least. There are several amp plugins if you want to use that, but I often get great results with my bass straight into the interface.


Thanks.

I already have an audio interface I got for guitar - but I never use it! I didn't like the choices of: a) latency or b) not hearing the guitar tone with crunch / effects. However, that won't be so much of an issue with bass.
#4
If you're having latency issues, it might be worth upgrading the interface or your computer. Recording bass is a bit hit and miss when you use an amp. You'll probably want a mic like an akg d112 to properly capture the sound and even then if you don't have a bass amp you arent going to get the same sort of sound. Im sure you can get plug ins to emulate certain amps to give a bit more of a natural tone. But on a purely logical basis, you risk breaking your guitar amp which will force you to use the interface as a DI only you won't have an amp anymore.
What DAW are you using? Pretty much all of them allow you to put effects on the input signal so you wont need to worry about hearing the clean sound.
DONT RISK IT, BUY A BASS AMP
#5
It's the M-Audio interface with the limited version of Pro Tools. I just never got the hang of it for guitar. It might do OK with the bass, though. Gotta be better than a synthesised bass! And I'm looking forward to learning how to play a 4-string - fingerstyle.
#6
Whats the computer? Ive heard and experienced alot of m audio interfaces having a multitude of problems that differ across OS' s. I think I prefer recording bass for 'everyday' use through di. Partly down to the ease and less variables. You can always re amp later if you fancy it. Of course if I had the time and money, not to forget patience I'd use 2 mics and a DI. The more lines I have, the more fiddling I can do afterwards!
Does your version of pro tools have a low latency mode? Not sure why you'd be getting latency issues unless you're running a load of other programs simultaneously. With my band we recorded an entire demo using an m audio with pro tools LE and a beta 58 mic.apart from drums which we did elsewhere
DONT RISK IT, BUY A BASS AMP
#7
Quote by moody git
Whats the computer?


Just an Acer laptop. Nothing special.

Does your version of pro tools have a low latency mode? Not sure why you'd be getting latency issues unless you're running a load of other programs simultaneously. With my band we recorded an entire demo using an m audio with pro tools LE and a beta 58 mic.apart from drums which we did elsewhere


The latency was not bad. I'm just very intolerant of it. I'll give it another go.
#8
a bass is professionally recorded both directly & through amp.. then both are mixed to get a good sound....

for home recordings, record direct then get some VSTs to alter the tone....
#9
Just remember, when you play a bass through a guitar amp, turn the treble on the amp UP.
That sounds pretty counter-intuitive, I know, but guitar amps are designed to pump out mid-range frequencies, so boosting the treble frequencies of the signal will help the amp push out the sound of your bass. It will make your sound a lot less muddier and cut down on the fuzz of the low notes.
Won't sound too "bassy," but a bass through a guitar amp is never going to sound that great anyway.
(A guitar through a bass amp, on the other hand, is mighty sweet if you want a nice deep clean sound!)
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