#1
Hey guys, I have been searching for a way to improve the tuning sustainability of my guitar and although I'm not a great fan of dive-bombs etc. I became interested in installing a Floyd rose tremolo system due its great tuning sustainability. Now I play in standard tuning and in drop-D tuning so after a little research I came across the EVH D-Tuna (http://www.thomann.de/gb/allparts_evh_dtuna_drop_d.htm).

Now I have a clue about how the Floyd Rose works but not about the floating / non floating position. It seems that if I want the EVH D-Tuna I will need to install my Floyd Rose non-floating. Is that correct? Will this solve my tuning problems?

Thanks in advance
#2
Installed in its natural, floating position, the spring tension perfectly matches the string tension. Thus, if you try to detune to dropped 'D', the string tension lowers and the springs pull all the other five strings sharp. Because the dropped 'D' tuning has a different tension than standard you have to adjust the springs to get it balanced and in tune again. I guess even using the EVH D-Tuna isn't going to escape the physics of the situation.

Easiest solution I can think of is to do a partial block of the trem. That way you could still dive-bomb but not pull up. But at least you could switch between standard and dropped 'D' (or any other tuning with a lower string tension than standard).
Ref: http://www.trueguitar.com/tremblocking.htm

Now, I have also seen a post where someone cunningly attached a small dead-bolt in the trem cavity that could be used to block the trem.
#3
Does your guitar already have a trem system?

If you're having problems with tuning stability you should look at what is causing it.

Locking tuners and a proper lubricated and cut nut will most likely get rid of your problems.
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#4
Quote by Kyleisthename
Does your guitar already have a trem system?

If you're having problems with tuning stability you should look at what is causing it.

Locking tuners and a proper lubricated and cut nut will most likely get rid of your problems.

^This, actually. A Floyd seems overkill (and unlikely) just for treating tuning stability.

I read "cut nut" too quickly and made my own word up.
#5
I have got a hardtailed fenderstyle tremolo system, a graphtech nut and decent tuners. However, I kinda like the idea of almost never have to tune again. Which would be very handy at gigs

I saw a second hand schaller floyd but the owner says that the knives are a little worn out which makes a floating bridge impossible. Is this bad? Considering I wont play divebombs etc, I just want to let my guitar stay in tune.
#6
Unfortunately, never having to tune again is pretty much unachievable. However stable your tuning is, whatever system you use, changes in temperature and the act of actually playing your guitar will inevitably lead to the need to retune. If you go for a double locking system all this means is that you'll be doing the necessary adjustments with the fine tuners rather than the machine heads.

I'm not saying that minimal tuning can't be achieved - I've often given a different guitar its first outing in months and found it still to be in perftect tune. But if I've had one in the boot of the car all day in 25ºC weather and then take it into our subterranean rehearsal room it's pretty certain to need retuning after a short while.

So, in my opinion, you'd be heading for disappointment if you think a double locking trem system is going to result in a "set and forget" guitar.
#7
You realize installing full double locking Floyd Rose system into a Strat with a vintage style trem is going to be a major pain in the ass don't you? The way you're writing makes me think you don't quite understand how different they are.

Seriously... as the poster up said, investigate why your current setup isn't working. It's likely to be tuners, string trees, nut, saddles that need attention, not hard to fix.

A tune once and forget guitar doesn't really exist, unless you want a full carbon fibre with graphite neck reinforcement.
#8
I forgot about the break angle over the nut can also help tuning stability.

Can you supply a picture of your headstock, bridge, and the trem cavity of your guitar?

I can offer what you'll need in order of importance if I know what you're working with.
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#9
Sorry guys, I forgot to mention some things. I only need information about the difference between a floating or a non floating floyd rose and which is required for the installment of a EVH D-Tuna. Being a huge Nuno Bettencourt fan I am customizing my guitar trying to make it like a Washburn N4. Like this one:

I truly appreciate the effort and help you guys have given me this far
#12
meh, unless it's better stability then a FR I doubt many would be into that. Can you drop tune it easy or what? doubtful it stays in tune as well as a good FR design as well. Maybe if you get better at using it it might get some interest. Good to have someone at least experimenting with different ideas though..

Besides the dives and squeals, I mostly like the very subtle stuff, seems like it would be awkward and not as effective on that (like on the modified FR trems), tuning stability is the most important of all to me though.
Last edited by Tempoe at Jun 15, 2013,
#13
Quote by Tempoe
meh, unless it's better stability then a FR I doubt many would be into that. Can you drop tune it easy or what? doubtful it stays in tune as well as a good FR design as well. Maybe if you get better at using it it might get some interest. Good to have someone at least experimenting with different ideas though..

It is not a floating trem and you can drop tune on the fly. Think of this tremolo as a 4 legged stool and a Floyd Rose as a 2 legged stool. The bad thing about this tremolo is that it takes serious body modification to install as the mechanism is inside the guitar between the bridge plate and the backing plate.
#15
Quote by Tempoe
Very cool if you can drop tune on the fly...!

Depending on how heavy of an action you are willing to put up with you can even break a string and stay in tune. If you'll read the description on Youtube you'll see that it has some unique features. That is not me in the video, I can't really play guitar. That is an actual guitar player that didn't have much time to learn how to use it.
#16
Dude just buy a N4, They sell for $150 on ebay.

Putting a floyd in a guitar that doesn't already have one is going to cost $300+
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#17
Here's what I do with all my floyds:

1. I block them for dive-bomb-only. I get the trem set up perfectly level in standard E tuning, then install a small bracket and screw in the trem cavity that pushes tight against the tone block of the floyd. This prevents the trem from being pulled up (i.e. from being pulled into the trem cavity).

2. Then I dial the low E string's fine tuner really tight, and then re-tune it back to E with the regular tuning machine on the headstock. Now I can dial it to drop-D with the fine tuner because I've set it up with a lot of travel space to reach the full step down.

Blocking the trems like this also just provides overall greater tuning stability. I can still dive bomb and make lots of cool tremolo squeals even though I can't pull up, and I can drop tune quickly during gigs, etc and the other 5 strings stay in pitch.