#1
What does a guitar practice session generally look like for you? What sort of songs, techniques, and skills are you working on?
#2
Back in the day: Run though (to a metronome) scales, string skipping, sweeping, legato, tapping, chord changes, improvise to backing tracks.

Nowadays: Pick up the guitar randomly throughout the day, improvise some stupid shit/write something/learn a song (basically just pissing around).



I believe jazz_rock_feel has a vigorous bass schedule that he adheres to everyday of the week, hopefully he'll post that up.
#3
Well i haven't been able to follow my practice routine these past 3 weeks cause i have had a lot to do. But since i'm going to have a break over the summer i will pick it up again.

It mostly consist of the following topics.

Technique (mostly alternate picking, cause that's the only thing i'm pretty terrible at nowdays)

Transcribing (Transcribing a lot of progressive metal/rock, jazz and fusion nowdays)

Improv (I've recorded individual chords and chord progressions, and don't name the mp3 files which chords or keys they are in, i'm developing my improv by listening, making up a line in my head, getting it out on the instrument.)

Sight reading

That's just for guitar though, i also have schedules for piano and bass.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#4
These days:

85% Technical Exercises
15% Solo Improv (improvising over mental chord progressions with no actual music playing behind me)

Playing music is not practicing music. Similar, but not the same.
"There are two styles of music. Good music and bad music." -Duke Ellington

"If you really think about it, the guitar is a pointless instrument." - Robert Fripp
#5
Quote by griffRG7321
Back in the day: Run though (to a metronome) scales, string skipping, sweeping, legato, tapping, chord changes, improvise to backing tracks.

Nowadays: Pick up the guitar randomly throughout the day, improvise some stupid shit/write something/learn a song (basically just pissing around).



I believe jazz_rock_feel has a vigorous bass schedule that he adheres to everyday of the week, hopefully he'll post that up.

Oh god, you just described my life. What the hell is wrong with us? I remember when I used to practice three hours a day, and now I'm going to school for music and I hardly even practice my instrument anymore. Man, I've gotta get my shit together.
#6
Back in the day, use to learn songs and stuff. nowadays i just **** around (sadly)
#7
I completely suck but as you have seen, I usually sit and try to figure stuff out on my own rather than tabs. It really does help as much as people say it does. I don't know all the notes on the neck but am understanding where each "sound" is. Just mess around.
#8
For now, I'm learning songs that incorporate 'jazzier' chords and solos (currently working on Kid Charlemagne). During summer break, I'm going to get back into sight reading, and hopefully in the fall, I'll get into theory with my guitar teacher.
#10
These days, I'm working on improving my finger dexterity and smoothing out my chord transitions. Soon I'll be refreshing my knowledge of theory. I'm also learning Heart Shaped Box.
#11
Picking: 1 hour(2notes per string, 3notes per string, 4 notes per string)
Sweep picking: 45 minutes(30minutes running through the shapes, 15 practicing song related stuff, right now Images by Cacophony)
Legato: Till my fingers hurt, usually takes about 20-30minutes of straight blasting
Chords: 30minutes(inversions and vocabulary)
Reading: 30minutes, I bought Pink Floyd Anthology which has melody, guitar & bass, I read a different song daily.
Composing: whenever, but usually have a concentrated hour.
Jam/rehearse: The rest of the day.
#12
Quote by metalmetalhead
just play man.

Just playing doesn't get the same results as a practice schedule in which you evaluate your technique/knowledge and try to develop to full extent.
#13
Quote by griffRG7321
Back in the day: Run though (to a metronome) scales, string skipping, sweeping, legato, tapping, chord changes, improvise to backing tracks.

Nowadays: Pick up the guitar randomly throughout the day, improvise some stupid shit/write something/learn a song (basically just pissing around).



I believe jazz_rock_feel has a vigorous bass schedule that he adheres to everyday of the week, hopefully he'll post that up.

This is exactly my situation
Ive been practicing piano lately.
Gotta get back on that horse.
#14
Quote by macashmack
This is exactly my situation
Ive been practicing piano lately.
Gotta get back on that horse.


I'm better now than I was when I practiced all the time, I could be better though lol.
#15
Quote by griffRG7321
I'm better now than I was when I practiced all the time, I could be better though lol.

I wish I could say the same.
#16
trying to play along to songs/recordings that seem impossible to play along to until i can. usually metal music because they have the best guitarists.
#17
Quote by dog_style
trying to play along to songs/recordings that seem impossible to play along to until i can. usually metal music because they have the best guitarists.


I wouldn't say they have the best guitarist, or that any genre of music has the "best guitarists". Cause there are too many different things to learn on guitar. There are for example people that can do crazy tapping stuff in metal but not comp to a funk groove at all, and vise versa.

And IF you had to label some genres musicians as "better" than others, i think there is a few that is above metal, jazz guitarists and fusion guitarists are crazy as well.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#18
Unlearning 30yrs of bad habits.

This week I am un-learning bad habits from year 17 next week I will unlearn year 16's bad habits.
#19
Quote by satchfan9
Just playing doesn't get the same results as a practice schedule in which you evaluate your technique/knowledge and try to develop to full extent.


Bull, A schedule isn't for everyone. You'll spend all that time working on technique with boring sounding shit. Ive been there no thanks.

Whats so good about all that technique if you don't know how to use it? Putting things into music and making a good sound is really number 1. I don't care how bad your technique is. You can start with slow slow blues Its much more enjoyable to.

technique is important but you don't have to make a schedule to live by to develop that. forcing yourself to practice even when you don't feel like it? IF your mind isn't there Your not even really practicing.

Hell ya know dream theater guy John putput. Hes got a rigorous practice routines and his leads doesn't even sound that good. great guitarist and all but compare the music to that of jimi page or hendrix and slash I get into that music more. so keep in mind even with poor technique a guitarist could be great.
#20
Quote by metalmetalhead


Hell ya know dream theater guy John putput. Hes got a rigorous practice routines and his leads doesn't even sound that good.


He doesn't afraid of anything and his power is maximum
#21
Quote by Sickz
I wouldn't say they have the best guitarist, or that any genre of music has the "best guitarists". Cause there are too many different things to learn on guitar. There are for example people that can do crazy tapping stuff in metal but not comp to a funk groove at all, and vise versa.

And IF you had to label some genres musicians as "better" than others, i think there is a few that is above metal, jazz guitarists and fusion guitarists are crazy as well.

metal guitarists have a tendency to be able to play any genre of music well. as where i see other genres not being able to play metal so well, especially speed metal or whatever you wanna label it as such.
i see metal guitarists take their craft more serious, that's why guitar magazines are more about the metal scene and famous metal players than anything.
too many different things to learn on guitar is a matter of opinion to me. many metal players play funk and jazz incorporated into their playing (i.e. funk metal and jazz metal bands/songs) and like to challenge something that may seem like too many or too much. playing crazy doesn't mean skill, metal guitarists practice perfection and get more technical from what i seen, besides feel. even in places like MIT there are more metal players there i believe for a reason. they tend to take it to more scientific levels from what i see.
#22
All practice routines should be varied as far as I'm concerned. Play as many different styles of guitar playing as you can, with special attention paid to ear training and improvisation!
#23
Quote by metalmetalhead
Bull, A schedule isn't for everyone. You'll spend all that time working on technique with boring sounding shit. Ive been there no thanks.

Whats so good about all that technique if you don't know how to use it? Putting things into music and making a good sound is really number 1. I don't care how bad your technique is. You can start with slow slow blues Its much more enjoyable to.

technique is important but you don't have to make a schedule to live by to develop that. forcing yourself to practice even when you don't feel like it? IF your mind isn't there Your not even really practicing.

Hell ya know dream theater guy John putput. Hes got a rigorous practice routines and his leads doesn't even sound that good. great guitarist and all but compare the music to that of jimi page or hendrix and slash I get into that music more. so keep in mind even with poor technique a guitarist could be great.



You can have a schedule without drilling technique, scheduling and the content you rehearse are entirely independent.
#24
Quote by dog_style
metal guitarists have a tendency to be able to play any genre of music well. as where i see other genres not being able to play metal so well, especially speed metal or whatever you wanna label it as such.
i see metal guitarists take their craft more serious, that's why guitar magazines are more about the metal scene and famous metal players than anything.
too many different things to learn on guitar is a matter of opinion to me. many metal players play funk and jazz incorporated into their playing (i.e. funk metal and jazz metal bands/songs) and like to challenge something that may seem like too many or too much. playing crazy doesn't mean skill, metal guitarists practice perfection and get more technical from what i seen, besides feel. even in places like MIT there are more metal players there i believe for a reason. they tend to take it to more scientific levels from what i see.


I've heard extremely few "metal guitarplayers" that have been able to do any convincing jazz playing. I've heard many of them play with influence from jazz (the odd times, more diverse note choices etc) but i can't say i've seen anything truly jazz, like joe pass/Andreas Oberg/Pat Martino. Of course i could be wrong.

I just feel that often metal guitarists gets praised too much. And just to clarify, i am a guitarist for both a metalband and a jazz/fusion quartet. So i am not saying that just too bash on metal guitarists, it's just my opinion.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#25
metal players who incorporate convincing jazz may be few, but you have seen it like you've said. some don't like it, but if they wanted to i believe they could more so.

I just feel that often metal guitarists gets praised too much

sounds like you just don't like the idea of conformity or anything as such. but why not give credit? even it's already been given when due time and time again. you don't have to, but i wouldn't discredit the truth respectively speaking because you get tired of hearing everyone or most saying it over and over.
#26
Quote by dog_style
metal players who incorporate convincing jazz may be few, but you have seen it like you've said. some don't like it, but if they wanted to i believe they could more so.

I just feel that often metal guitarists gets praised too much

sounds like you just don't like the idea of conformity or anything as such. but why not give credit? even it's already been given when due time and time again. you don't have to, but i wouldn't discredit the truth respectively speaking because you get tired of hearing everyone or most saying it over and over.


I just mean that the majority of the guitar community i talk with only praise metal guitarists. It's not like i hear a lot of "Oh that blues guy is killer" or "Man that funk guy really knows how to play". It just seems to me like if you want to, as you said, get credit for being an awesome guitarist, most of the time you have to be a metal guitarist. This may just be cause i live in an area where most of the few people that are not a part of the mainstream pop scene are metalheads. I just think that people of all styles should be credited with being great musicians and that there are people in styles such as jazz that can play circles around many metal guitar players, and vise versa.

That's just what i think. But i don't think we should hijack this thread anymore for the discussion, since it's not the purpose of this thread. But if you want to continue the discussion, throw me a PM, cause it's an interesting topic.
Fusion and jazz musician, a fan of most music.

Quote by Guthrie Govan
“If you steal from one person it's theft, and if you steal from lots of people it's research”


Quote by Chick Corea
"Only play what you hear. If you don't hear anything, don't play anything."
#28
You know which guitarists I meet tend to be the most versatile?

Pop cover band guitarists - sorry folks.
#29
What I work on is largely mental.

What other instruments often teach way more than guitarists is to eliminate necessary movement. I remember a professor at UT who is the classical guitar director was giving a masterclass, and he told the story about how Bruce Lee could knock down a martial arts master with a one inch punch. That's essentially the power you want when playing. Being able to play to a high standard, while keeping the movements and actions of your hand minimal, for the purpose of saving your energy and not getting them tired during performance.

For instance, with the left hand, most people push down with their fingers with far more force than necessary to play the note. Depending on how difficult the music is that you're playing, that can really drain the stamina in your hand and effect your playing later in the piece.

So basically when I practice a piece, I play it SLOW. Like half-tempo. Playing slow also increases accuracy and helps with muscle memory. I try to conserve the energy in my hands and use a minimum amount of physical force to play the piece, while still maintaining a full sound and tone.
Last edited by The Madcap at Jun 16, 2013,
#31
Quote by Sickz

That's just what i think. But i don't think we should hijack this thread anymore for the discussion, since it's not the purpose of this thread. But if you want to continue the discussion, throw me a PM, cause it's an interesting topic.

well i won't hijack the thread anymore after this. but when it comes to players like stevie ray Vaughan, eric clapton they do get plenty of praise. even if they are rock oriented. jazz players don't which is true, but they don't seem to care about stardom which may contribute to that and jazz doesn't seem to be as popular, that's my opinion. also, sorry but i don't get into PMing with people. later. thanks...
#32
When I started out, a lot of following along with songs. Then I got a book and would read off that to learn chords, scales, etc. Now a days (5 years later), I don't really "practice" per se, it's really just a mix of playing bits of songs, soloing, and occasionally developing something into a new song. Every once in awhile I'll actually try to learn something new, or put into practice some things I rarely use, but other then that, I'm just dicking around.
#33
I don't practice guitar or bass at all during my regular school year. I spend all of my practice time on bassoon, ccontrabassoon, or my techniques instruments. When I practice bassoon, I start with 20-30 minutes of scales, weait warmups, treklang melodie, and eastman arpeggios, which are all warmups, the latter focusing on chordal and arpeggio work. Then I usually move onto my solo and I do about an hour of work on that. I finish up with my etudes for however long I can.
Strauss!
"I am hitting my head against the walls, but the walls are giving way." - Gustav Mahler.

Quote by AeolianWolf
absolutely what will said

Yay, my first compliment!
#34
Half of my practice is transcribing by ear whatever music I'm enjoying listening to.

The other half is playing to backing tracks and practicing whatever licks I try to use and am not able to play cleanly.