#1
Hi,

I have done plenty of singing whilst playing guitar in the past. Mostly rock songs with electric guitar and a band behind, and mic'ed.

But lately I have been doing a lot of acoustic stuff whilst singing and I am having a massive problem.

I have no problem with actually singing and playing at the same time. The guitar, melody, lyrics and feel come across just fine.

But the problem I am having is I keep automatically shouting a little over the guitar, which is causing me to strain, and not only is it making my vocal worse, it is causing genuine pain and right now the back of my mouth feels really uncomfortable even though I am not even using my voice.

I have tried playing quieter, but then the songs just dont sound right. I have tried singing softer, which works ok but I find it hard to keep up as to me my voice is dominated by the guitar (although around the room it is not). Today I have been practicing miced but it just isnt helping.

I am an experienced singer. I have had lessons and do plenty of vocal recording. If I sing with out the guitar I dont shout, strain or feel pain and it sounds just how I want it. Even if the backing music is loud.

I have been planning to play an open mic tonight but if I carry on I am going to ruin my voice.

Any advice would be extremely appreciated.

Thanks.
#2
If you're playing with a PA, get a monitor, you may just feel like youre being drowned out because you can't ehar what the audience can hear, especially if you're in front of your guitar amp.
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#3
^ Yeah, that. Leave it to the PA guy to get the levels right when playing live.

When practicing at home, don't worry about being loud enough to be heard over your guitar, even if you were just whispering you'd still be able to hear yourself as you don't really hear the sound of your own voice in the same way that other people hear you. Something to do with the sounds resonation within the skull, it's why you always sound different on recordings to how you think you sound.
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#5
Is it a particularly high pitched song?
Gear:

Gibson 2005 Les Paul Standard
Fender Road Worn Strat w/ Noiseless pickups
Marshall JCM 2000 401C
Marshall Vintage Modern 2266
Marshall 1960A cab (Dave Hill from Slade's old cab)
Ibanez TS9DX
EHX Little Big Muff
Freshman Acoustic
#6
Quote by ProphetToJables
Is it a particularly high pitched song?


No, not at all. But its faster and more aggressive. The other two are soft songs.

Its only a three song set for this open mic.

I'v worked on winding down the volume a few more notches and it feels a whole let better. Not just on the throat, on the soul to!
Last edited by jkielq91 at Jun 12, 2013,
#7
I would try to get a monitor and place it in front of you. That way you are hearing what the crowd is hearing.

Or, you could get in ear monitors but I hear they're pretty expensive. Don't know much else.
Caution:
This post may contain my opinion and/or inaccurate information.

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