#1
I'm playing an Epihone SG solid body for rhythm and the lead guitarist is playing a Gibson Les Paul semi-hollow body. Whenever we play live, reviewers say its hard to hear my guitar over his. From what I've been told, his guitar has a stronger and brighter tone that resonates more and mine sounds flatter. We're trying to pull off a post-hardcore, post-grunge, alternative metal/rock sound. Is there anything I could do to make my guitar more balanced with his?
#2
Use different EQ. Guitar is a mid instrument, so EQ both to have mids, and then the other with more treble and the other with more bass. And you can always just up the volume on your guitar.
#4
Mids!
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#6
Well our practice amps are a Roland 20x Cube (me) and an Orange 35 (him), but the problem is more of when we play live. When we play live, I use a Marshall and he uses a Mesa head with a Blackstar cabinet I think.
#7
Quote by Leonid Vilkov
Well our practice amps are a Roland 20x Cube (me) and an Orange 35 (him), but the problem is more of when we play live. When we play live, I use a Marshall and he uses a Mesa head with a Blackstar cabinet I think.

A Marshall what?

Are you miced? Because if you are, it's the problem of a bad mix. And there's nothing you can do about it (other than boost your mids if you are scooping them), it's the fault of the sound guy. But if you aren't miced (and even if you are), do a soundcheck so that somebody in your band or some of your friends goes to the audience and listens to the balance and tells you if it's OK or something should be louder or quieter. Have a soundcheck before you play a gig! Tell the sound guy you want your guitar to be heard. There has always been pretty bad sound in all gigs I have seen. The guitars are usually too quiet and the bass and especially bass drum are too loud (or there's too much bass frequencies). So before you perform do a soundcheck.
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Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#9
Don't be afraid to make the sound guy work. In my experience, as long as you are nice to him/her, they will try to make you sound good. I use a wireless kit on my bass, and I usually step off the stage during sound checks when we play a song snippet just to hear it for myself. It usually helps.
#10
I don't know what models they are. Sorry :/ I know they're definitely tube amps though. And we're not really playing gigs. We've just played open mics at Sam Ash music store every Wednesday. And the amps aren't miced. There is a guy manning a soundboard, so maybe they are miced? I'm not sure because I don't see any monitors or or mics near the amps, but we're definitely not scooping the mids. I keep mine at 5 and he turns his up to a 7 or 8. The bass and treble are around 6 or 7. Gain is at 7 or 6. Not sure what presence is for though.
#11
Try and balance them yourself, then. Practice with the amps, make sure someone is listening specifically to that.
Play with settings until you find a sweet spot and write it down. Or put a little white-out dot at the knob setting.
#12
Quote by Leonid Vilkov
I don't know what models they are. Sorry :/ I know they're definitely tube amps though. And we're not really playing gigs. We've just played open mics at Sam Ash music store every Wednesday. And the amps aren't miced. There is a guy manning a soundboard, so maybe they are miced? I'm not sure because I don't see any monitors or or mics near the amps, but we're definitely not scooping the mids. I keep mine at 5 and he turns his up to a 7 or 8. The bass and treble are around 6 or 7. Gain is at 7 or 6. Not sure what presence is for though.


and we have a winner! more mids you need to have hmmmm?
#13
Ok. Thanks. Now say the mids are the same, but the problem persists. What should I do then?
#14
Quote by WaltTheWerewolf
and we have a winner! more mids you need to have hmmmm?
Not necessarily. We don't even know what model the amps are. One might have very strong mids already and turning it down might match another amp with the mids cranked. The numbers on the front are hardly represent the same frequency range for every amp.

Mids are important but you dont want to over do it. Take my V3m as an example, anywhere past 6 or 7 on the mid range and the amp turns into a muddy mess. Keeping them at 5 is actually enough. Then on my Ampeg VH140c, you need to crank the mids way up to reach acceptable rock levels (obviously its meant for scooped metal tones).
#15
Quote by ExDementia
Not necessarily. We don't even know what model the amps are. One might have very strong mids already and turning it down might match another amp with the mids cranked. The numbers on the front are hardly represent the same frequency range for every amp.

Mids are important but you dont want to over do it. Take my V3m as an example, anywhere past 6 or 7 on the mid range and the amp turns into a muddy mess. Keeping them at 5 is actually enough. Then on my Ampeg VH140c, you need to crank the mids way up to reach acceptable rock levels (obviously its meant for scooped metal tones).


Good point there, Mesa are dark sounding to my ears so it probably needs more mids than the marshall I guess. Perhaps gain can be a factor too?
#16
We have our gain around 7. Could presence be a factor? I'm not sure what that knob does on those tube amps.
#17
Presence effects the high range mostly.

This thread is getting kind of stupid and it really isn't helping you at all. Honestly, it just sounds like you need to turn up. You can't give us the model names so we have no idea what either of you sounds like. We can say "hey, turn this knob a bit," but really, we're just taking a shot in the dark.

Sit down and jam with the guy for a bit and mess with your settings until you cut through the mix better. That will solve your problem 1000 times faster than us just guessing what you need. It sounds like you need experience EQ'ing yourself anyway.

/thread
#18
Not being funny but have you considered that perhaps you just aren't turning up enough? Mesa's tend to be dark and tight - Marshalls have rather a middy crunch sound naturally - assuming you aren't deliberately EQ'ing them to sound the same i'd think you would be out of each others frequency range anyway.

My Guess? We perceive mids and highs as being louder than Lows, so i reckon because you are right in front of your amp and can hear yourself fine you assume you're loud enough out front - so just turn up man, problem solved.