#1
Hey guys

I've been trying to record some guitar for an EP with distorted parts, but it seems no matter what I do its coming through very noisy and messy and overall bad sounding. I'm playing a Gibson LP Studio straight into a Mesa Dual Rectifier Roadster mic'ed up with a 57, which i've moved around plenty, into my MBox and into ProTools. I could use some advice on how to set my amp EQ and how to mic it up. I'm shooting for a clear distorted tone similar to what you might hear from Tool, Breaking Benjamin, or the like. Thanks a lot!
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#2
For amp EQ, I would get it sounding like what you want in the room first. Then move the mic around. Try maybe an inch of the grill, pointed right where the dustcap meets the cone. That's generally my starting place, but it'll probably need more tweaking after that. Try moving in on several different axes; up/down, left/right, closer/farther, angle the mic some. It'll take some tweaking, but with the gear you have you should be able to find a pretty decent sound.
#3
Quote by chaosmoon
For amp EQ, I would get it sounding like what you want in the room first. Then move the mic around. Try maybe an inch of the grill, pointed right where the dustcap meets the cone. That's generally my starting place, but it'll probably need more tweaking after that. Try moving in on several different axes; up/down, left/right, closer/farther, angle the mic some. It'll take some tweaking, but with the gear you have you should be able to find a pretty decent sound.


+1

Also, dial back the gain. A lot of people (myself definatly included) make the mistake of cranking the drive up to 8-10, and that's usually just overkill. Another thing is the ensure you have enough mid-range going in, even if you're going for a scooped sound. The recording make lack the fullness you're looking for but that's why you usually record several guitar tracks.
#4
Use less gain!!!!


*haha sleeves beat me to it
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#5
I've tried pretty much all of that, but what's coming through is still just pretty much a mess of noise
Rock on or die

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Quote by angusfan16
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#6
Quote by nirvanagrunge13
I've tried pretty much all of that, but what's coming through is still just pretty much a mess of noise

Then turn the gain down a little bit more? On both your amp AND the interface. Then turn up your monitors to make up the volume while you mix. It's better for your mix to track lower, then bring the volume back up in mastering.
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#7
Sounds like you know what your doing but just in case, I'd say make sure your levels are not clipping.
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#8
Mic'ing the amp will differ per mic, amp, and cabinet. However, I'll tell you how I mic my distorted tones. I use an Audix i5 (which is like a shure sm57). First I place it about half an inch from the grill cloth, halfway between the center of the cone and the edge of the speaker. Then I usually angle the mic in a bit toward the center to catch some more highs and less mud. From there I record a few takes and move the mic around to find the sound I like best.

Also I have my mids pretty high, but I use a Blackstar HT-20 head into a Jet City cab, and your amp is different. How loud do you have your amp? If it's quiet and you're cranking the preamp gain on the mic to get the levels up it won't sound as good as having the amp up to a decent volume.
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#9
Maybe upload some clips so we can better try to isolate the problem?
Pictures would probably help too
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#10
Make sure you are hearing what the mic is hearing. That is to say, get the amp up off the floor, and angle it up towards your ears. What the backs of your knees hear and what your ears hear in the room are two entirely different things.

If you're brave enough, stick your head right in front of the cab. Then you'll know what the mic is hearing. Season to taste.

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#12
Check your levels working with your usual configuration first. -12dB peaks are what you should aim for.

If that's what you're getting, then onto the next one.

WATCH YOUR GAIN. Less can be more, ESPECIALLY in double tracking. Find the sound you like in the room, them bump the gain back a notch if you hate it when it's mic'd up.

If you still hate it, move that mic around!

I see so many engineers going straight to the grille with an sm57 anymore.

If that's the sound you like, sweet... For me, it NEVER gets my rocks off and I usually record heavy heavy stuff.

Whitechapel-ish music, Necrophagist, Keith Merrow, Ola Englund (generally aiming for that tone.)

Try backing the mic off of that grille a bit.

An inch, 2 inch, 6 if that's what it takes.

Just don't go too far back or you'll lose attack, which with heavy, is generally what you don't want.

You'd be surprised how many "not metal" mic positions can make your tone the sound of satan's farts (and I mean that in the best way possible.)

Do a guitar setup, also, for the love of all that is unholy metal carnage. A real setup. Neck, new strings, bridge hight, intonation. Everything.

Another thing which is absolutely friggin critical to me, THE BASS GUITAR.

Make sure you use a bass, and make sure you do it right. That's a whole different topic though, so if you want me to get into that, feel free to shoot a reply back and we can geek out about some bass stuff.

Cheers, mate!
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