#1
I know how to make a good amount of chords from their 'formulas' ie. R-3-5 but I still am not sure how a Chord/Chord is made like C/Bb.

Is it just the R-3-5 of both played at once? Or is it something different?
#2
Those are called slash chords. The note on the right of the slash is the bass note of the chord (even if it's not a chord tone). In this case, it's a C major chord with Bb in the bass.
"I agree with Matthew about everything" - Everyone
#3
It's just a C7 in 3rd inversion. There are many.
-0-----
-1-5-5-8
-0-5-5-9
-2-5-5-10
-1-1---
-----6-6
#4
It's important to note the distinction between slash chords and inversions in actual practice. Slash chords are pronounced "C7 over B flat", meaning a C7 chord over the note Bb.

There are four uses for slash chords:

1) When writing for guitar only, to indicate a chord inversion, like C7/Bb. This is an informal use.

2) When writing for guitar only, to indicate a bass line, like the sequence C - G/B - Am

3) When writing for anyone, to indicate a non-chord tone in the bass, like C7/Ab

4) when writing for ensembles, to indicate a specific line for the bassist, like the sequence Cm - Cm/B - Cm/Bb.


Now when you're just talking to people and communicating what you're playing, it's usually easiest to use slash chords for inversion, but you wouldn't normally do this when writing something down. Typically a guitarist reading a chart can infer the voice leading implied by the chords without slashes, and in an ensemble wouldn't even need to worry about the bass part.
Last edited by cdgraves at Jun 13, 2013,
#5
Its a way of showing both inversion and suspensions of chords.

C/E shows a C Major chord in first inversion, where E is in the bass.

C/D shows a C Major Add 9 chord, where D is in the bass.

C/B shows a C Major 7 chord, where B is in the bass.

Or, if you're talking about something like V/IV, that indicates that the chord is functioning as a dominant to the IV, meaning that it has a fifth relation to the IV and contains some form of cadential motion within it.

But that's probably not what you're asking.
#6
Short answer...
Quote by MattyBoy 1337
Those are called slash chords. The note on the right of the slash is the bass note of the chord (even if it's not a chord tone). In this case, it's a C major chord with Bb in the bass.


Long answer...
Quote by cdgraves
It's important to note the distinction between slash chords and inversions in actual practice. Slash chords are pronounced "C7 over B flat", meaning a C7 chord over the note Bb.

There are four uses for slash chords:

1) When writing for guitar only, to indicate a chord inversion, like C7/Bb. This is an informal use.

2) When writing for guitar only, to indicate a bass line, like the sequence C - G/B - Am

3) When writing for anyone, to indicate a non-chord tone in the bass, like C7/Ab

4) when writing for ensembles, to indicate a specific line for the bassist, like the sequence Cm - Cm/B - Cm/Bb.


Now when you're just talking to people and communicating what you're playing, it's usually easiest to use slash chords for inversion, but you wouldn't normally do this when writing something down. Typically a guitarist reading a chart can infer the voice leading implied by the chords without slashes, and in an ensemble wouldn't even need to worry about the bass part.

Although I regularly see the slash chords written down in standard notation and in chord charts. In fact due to the frequency I see them notated I would say that it is typical.


To really nitpick - X/X implies the same variable on both sides of the "/". So whatever is on the left would also be on the right. You should have used a different variable on each side e.g. X/Y. But you got your point across without confusion and in the end that's all that really matters.
Si
#7
Theory Wonk Zone:

Do you mean you see slash chords, ie C/E, even when that E isn't the in ensemble's bass?

I only nitpick because saying "in the bass", which slash chords mean, implies SATB-type voicing, where you expect intentional voice leading. Triad inversion alone doesn't necessarily imply multi-part voicing or melodic lines in the outer voices (though that's a typical function of it).

I generally consider charts as written for ensemble rather than guitar specifically, in which case the guitar is likely not playing the bass part, so the indicated bass doesn't really matter.


And a fun aside, you can almost think charts them as figured bass - the staff notation is the melody, and the chords above are the bass and inner voices. Just with a chord name instead of an bass note and intervals. It's pretty interesting to compare Bach-era conventions to jazz.
#8
In regards to how the chord is used it is in a jazz fake book for "The Waters of March" and the music is written to be interpreted for any melody and/ or rhythm players in this case (vocals, piano, guitar, etc.)
#9
Quote by cdgraves
It's important to note the distinction between slash chords and inversions in actual practice. Slash chords are pronounced "C7 over B flat", meaning a C7 chord over the note Bb.

There are four uses for slash chords:

1) When writing for guitar only, to indicate a chord inversion, like C7/Bb. This is an informal use.

2) When writing for guitar only, to indicate a bass line, like the sequence C - G/B - Am

3) When writing for anyone, to indicate a non-chord tone in the bass, like C7/Ab

4) when writing for ensembles, to indicate a specific line for the bassist, like the sequence Cm - Cm/B - Cm/Bb.


Now when you're just talking to people and communicating what you're playing, it's usually easiest to use slash chords for inversion, but you wouldn't normally do this when writing something down. Typically a guitarist reading a chart can infer the voice leading implied by the chords without slashes, and in an ensemble wouldn't even need to worry about the bass part.


What the **** did I just read?
#10
Yip just picking up notation books and looking through them it is pretty consistent that when a C major chord is played over an E bass note the chord is written as C/E or if it's a descending bass line the chords are written as slash chords where the triad stays the same and the bass line descends. E.G. | Am | Am/G | Am/F# | E | I see it all the time.

To be fair though I'm not looking at Bach, Jazz, or four part writing. I'm looking mostly at guitar oriented rock over the last 60 years.
Si
#11
Quote by ToneMasterDelux
I know how to make a good amount of chords from their 'formulas' ie. R-3-5 but I still am not sure how a Chord/Chord is made like C/Bb.

Is it just the R-3-5 of both played at once? Or is it something different?
One thing to make note of, many open chords which are extended across 5 or 6 strings, are actually, "slash chords".

An A major across 6 strings would be "A/E" (E on E-6)

D major across 5 strings would be, "D/A". (A = A-5 open)

C major across 6 strings would be "C/G" (G @3rd fret E-6)

Only E major & minor contain the root on the lowest string open. These are sometimes referred to as "root 6 voices", and that tracks all the way up the neck with the same shape barre variants.

A common device in folk music is G (all 6 strings), D/F#, (F# @ 2nf fret E-6), Em (root on E-6) This can be part of a common turnaround progression. "G, D/F#, Em, A, D".

You probably know and play slash chords, it's just a question of the terminology.
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 14, 2013,