#1
ok so since i started about a year ago i believe it was in july or august wasnt long before i joined UG i have been practicing almost religiously and the sessions last a while and i have fallen victim to gross mistakes and noodling. although about a month ago i start seriously practicing timing myself using a metronome, im a noob BPM chaser, and i had some progress but nothing substantial. after a 3 day break and some new string aerobics to do i have gained 50 bpm cleanly and my picking hand feels 10x more relaxed at higher speeds, i practice tremolo picking just to help raw picking speed.

Now to the point, can you over train yourself playing guitar like you can your muscle in the gym and get to a plateau?
#2
Quote by sw4l

Now to the point, can you over train yourself playing guitar like you can your muscle in the gym and get to a plateau?

NO!
NOW GO PRACTICE!!

You should however not practice the same things hours on end.
You shouldn't really practice anything for more than 30 min at a time - and even that is stretching it, I believe.
Personally I'd say 10-15 min and then move on to something different for that practice session.
It takes a lot of time to build muscle memory, and if you do the same thing for too long, you'll start getting sloppy, and then that is what the muscle memory will get ingrained.
There is a lot more to add to this obviously, but that should help a little I hope.

NOW GO PRACTICE!
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#3
Quote by Shor
NO!
NOW GO PRACTICE!!

You should however not practice the same things hours on end.
You shouldn't really practice anything for more than 30 min at a time - and even that is stretching it, I believe.
Personally I'd say 10-15 min and then move on to something different for that practice session.
It takes a lot of time to build muscle memory, and if you do the same thing for too long, you'll start getting sloppy, and then that is what the muscle memory will get ingrained.
There is a lot more to add to this obviously, but that should help a little I hope.

NOW GO PRACTICE!


I posted that after about an hour practice session. I just noticed a significant improvement after a few days of not doing an actual practice session. Thought there maybe a coorlation there.
#4
Quote by sw4l
Now to the point, can you over train yourself playing guitar like you can your muscle in the gym and get to a plateau?


Just like practically everything you can practice, you can reach a plateau You have to practice smarter and not just more if you want to improve.

In my opinion, varying exercises that aren't too dragged out and challenge your current skill level give the best gains. Practicing at 200 bpm for 4 hours is excessive and it reaches a level of diminishing returns and actual damage because of hand cramping etc.

My 'intense' practice routine involves playing a piece at half speed with the addition of one measure to the piece after the entire thing can be played 3 consecutive times flawlessly. I don't bother raising the tempo, I just focus on getting the movements and timing right and then move on. After sleeping on it and letting the synapses form, I naturally gain considerable speed and do it the next day at 75% speed.

It usually takes me about 3 weeks to fully learn most songs. A week of getting to 'know'(listening to it a million times) along with 2 weeks of practicing. It's slower than the usual, but it's very effective at learning to play pieces accurately and cleanly.
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#5
Yes you can practice too much. It's important to take a good 15-30 minute break every hour or so in my opinion, and even more frequently if you're playing the same thing over and over. I for instance will NEVER practice one section of a solo over and over and over for more than like 15-30mins max without taking a break because i know I'll get worse.

I notice it most when i record myself playing. I'm quite a perfectionist when it comes to recording myself so 99% of the time i will have many many takes and i immediately notice after a several takes I'll get significantly worse because I'm just forcing myself to keep playing the same thing over and over when i know i need a rest. Usually with my recordings my first 15minutes or so of playing ends up being uploaded and the rest usually starts to sound more and more like dogshit.
Last edited by vayne92 at Jun 14, 2013,
#6
Quote by vayne92
Yes you can practice too much. It's important to take a good 15-30 minute break every hour or so in my opinion, and even more frequently if you're playing the same thing over and over. I for instance will NEVER practice one section of a solo over and over and over for more than like 15-30mins max without taking a break because i know I'll get worse.

I notice it most when i record myself playing. I'm quite a perfectionist when it comes to recording myself so 99% of the time i will have many many takes and i immediately notice after a several takes I'll get significantly worse because I'm just forcing myself to keep playing the same thing over and over when i know i need a rest. Usually with my recordings my first 15minutes or so of playing ends up being uploaded and the rest usually starts to sound more and more like dogshit.


Same thing for me about the recording part. I'm a perfectionist as well, I'll have many takes because I don't want a mistake. Anyway, after some takes, I start to get worse.

In brief, don't spend too much time on the same thing.

Good luck
"Sans la musique, la vie serait une erreur" Nietzsche
#7
you can never practice "too much", but you can practice poorly by not taking breaks, obsessing on one thing for hours, or failing to focus. Use a timer and don't spend more than 20 minutes on one thing.

Consistency is most important. Don't spend too long per day on any single thing, but practice the same things several times per week to really learn them.
#8
Of course you can practice too much, hell too much exercise can accelerate your aging. Everything has a limit. I also sometimes find that taking a 3 day break results in better more relaxed playing. Always alternate between consecutive days of focused playing and then more casual sessions to keep things balanced. In addition to maintaining the health of your joints and muscles to avoid potential problems like CTS and arthiritis.
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Last edited by breakstuff at Jun 24, 2013,
#9
Good technique how you avoid repetitive stress injuries.

If you have healthy technique you can practice 4+ hours per day no problem. If you play professionally you probably need to practice this much just to maintain. Really, it's your concentration that wears out before your hands.

As long as you are using good technique, feel free to phase in more practice until you find yourself mentally exhausted.

And yes, do take some relaxation days where you focus on playing, grooving, and feeling music naturally.
#10
i usually push myself technically pretty hard most time because i want to have the speed to shred but i take the weekends to go over some theory try to learn the notes on my fretboard. After i go over my theory i make a clean backing track to a few new chords that i have learned and improvise over it and try to work on my groove.
#12
Quote by jamallax89
Practice makes a man perfect.


No, perfect practice makes perfect.
"Sans la musique, la vie serait une erreur" Nietzsche