#1
So I've been having trouble with tabs and personal songs with knowing what is a verse and what is a chorus. Can anybody help identify the difference between the two? Also does anybody else have this problem?
#4
I don't think knowing the definitions will assist you with writing music. But I can tell you the answer to your question is just a Google search away. The chorus is generally the part of a song that each verse is building towards, it's like the climax for shitty pop music.
#5
Chorus in the mainstream is where the song climaxes, usually with a hook or catchy part.

Verse is generally building towards the chorus, more subdued.

These are basic definitions, but you don't need to abide by them at all. You can have asubdued chorus, you can have no chorus, just experiment and do what sounds right!
#6
Listen to Smells Like Teen Spirit by Nirvana. You should be able to tell the verses from the choruses. Choruses sound bigger, verses sound smaller. The bridges are the parts in between.
"I agree with Matthew about everything" - Everyone
#7
Think about what you want to write about. Writing about your own experiences is always the best way to go, because you'll know how the song should feel. If you want your song to tell a story, think about each part of that story and how it feels. Make sure the story isn't too complicated, because it will be hard to understand.
#9
Quote by fullstop
Chorus are the part that repeats twice or more.

Yes... Though you can also repeat the verse twice. Chorus is the catchy part of your song. And chorus is a part that needs to be repeated, otherwise I wouldn't call it chorus. But a song doesn't need to have a chorus. Some songs have two choruses.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#10
Quote by MattyBoy 1337
Listen to Smells Like Teen Spirit by Nirvana. You should be able to tell the verses from the choruses. Choruses sound bigger, verses sound smaller. The bridges are the parts in between.


that's my favorite song, so the part with less distortion is the verse?
#11
Quote by ehbacon
that's my favorite song, so the part with less distortion is the verse?

Yep that's it, you can hear how the chorus with distortion has more power and more energy, and is more memorable, whereas the verse isn't so much.
#12
Also listen to Highway to Hell or TNT by AC/DC. I think in those songs it's really easy to hear where the verse ends and the chorus starts. Many times chorus is the part of the song whose lyrics and melody you remember best. Pretty often the lyrics in a chorus include the song title.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Fender Dimension Bass
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#13
I think a chorus is part where you want your audience to sing along. You pretty much have to repeat it for this to happen. Verses tend to separate the chorus and kind of expound upon the chosen theme of your music.
#14
Quote by ehbacon
that's my favorite song, so the part with less distortion is the verse?



Well yeah. It's that really calm section where Kurt plays 2 notes every once in a while.

Here's the lyrics.

VERSE 1
Load up on guns, bring your friends
It's fun to lose and to pretend
She's overboard and self-assured
Oh, no, I know a dirty word

PRE CHORUS (or maybe even bridge)
Hello, Hello, Hello, How Low (x3)
Hello, Hello, Hello

CHORUS
With the lights out, it's less dangerous
Here we are now, entertain us
I feel stupid and contagious
Here we are now, entertain us

A mulatto
An albino
A mosquito
My libido
Yeah

Hey... Yay

VERSE 2
I'm worse at what I do best
And for this gift I feel blessed
Our little group (tribe) has always been
And always will until the end

PRE CHORUS (or bridge)
Hello, Hello, Hello, How Low (x3)
Hello, Hello, Hello

Chorus
With the lights out, it's less dangerous
Here we are now, entertain us
I feel stupid and contagious
Here we are now, entertain us

A mulatto
An albino
A mosquito
My libido
Yeah

Hey... Yay

GTR. SOLO

VERSE 3
And I forget just why I taste
Oh, yeah, I guess it makes me smile
I found it hard, it's hard to find
Oh well, whatever, nevermind

PRE CHORUS (or bridge)
Hello, Hello, Hello, How Low (x3)
Hello, Hello, Hello

CHORUS (do you notice how the chorus always repeats the lyrics)
With the lights out, it's less dangerous
Here we are now, entertain us
I feel stupid and contagious
Here we are now, entertain us

A mulatto
An albino
A mosquito
My libido

Yeah a denial
A denial! (x9)

This is a really simple (almost cookie-cutter) song when it comes to structure. So It's a good example. The Verses are quiet with different lyrics each time, the Choruses are more energetic with repeating lyrics, the Pre-Choruses tie them together with a medium energy, and the solo is like the climax. More complicated songs often have more complicated structures, but these concepts are true 99.9% of the time in popular music.
"I agree with Matthew about everything" - Everyone