#1
2 months of drying on a tele body, 8-15 light mist coats sanded every 2-3 coats- behlen nitro.

I can still dent it with my nail using a bit of force
in comparison to my rock solid (likely poly or acrylic) ltd impossible to nail dent...

How strong is nitro supposed to be when fully cured?
Gear:
ESP LTD MH-1000
ESP EDWARDS LP-92CD
Shchecter ATX Blackjack
Fender Deluxe Stratocaster (H-S-S)
Last edited by sehnomatic at Jun 14, 2013,
#2
It's pretty weak. I'm not sure if I could dent mine with a nail (I'm not gonna try) but I've definitely dented it with little to no impact.
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#3
Nitro takes a long time to cure, which is why manufacturers don't like using it. FWIW, the nitro finish on my guitars seems to be fairly hard.
#4
Notice how old guitars wear differently/quicker when they used to use Nitro all the time?
Yeah.
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#5
With all of my strength able to but a little ding on the finish (Under the pick guard area)

the guitar was in a closet for those 2 montha meaning air circulation wasn't great.
Since it is now relatively hard, I'll hang it in front of a window maybe 1 week each side. HopAefully it'll get harder
Gear:
ESP LTD MH-1000
ESP EDWARDS LP-92CD
Shchecter ATX Blackjack
Fender Deluxe Stratocaster (H-S-S)
#6
Quote by sehnomatic
2 months of drying on a tele body, 8-15 light mist coats sanded every 2-3 coats- behlen nitro.

I can still dent it with my nail using a bit of force
in comparison to my rock solid (likely poly or acrylic) ltd impossible to nail dent...

How strong is nitro supposed to be when fully cured?
Possibly a very long time to cure fully. Part of it involves the temperature range of the thinner you used. Thinners for high temps, have more "******er" in them. This is a slower drying group of solvents, added to increase flow out, and prevent "blushing". Blush happens when lacquer dries too quickly and absorbs water for the atmosphere. (High humidity days are bad for doing nitro work).

Nitro is a very thin film and brittle paint. Hence it's easy to ding. The film thickness of modern poly finishes is probably near triple that of lacquer, coat for coat.

Most all paints enjoy being force dried to one degree or another. The sun is an excellent source of infrared energy. You could leave it sit outside in short bursts on a sunny day.

Nitro is basically a lousy paint to deal with. It's temperamental, it doesn't age well, and for spot repairs, (in auto body work), if you add too much ******er, it eats into the lower strata of the job, (body filler, primer, surfacing putty), and causes checking. On automobiles that were even finished with acrylic lacquers, repainting is usually done with acrylic enamel.

I appreciate the "authenticity" aspect of a lacquer finish. But, it's no longer used in industry for a number of very good reasons.

Without starting and huge ruckus, and this is only my opinion, a nitro finish would be more appropriate for acoustic instruments, because of it's thin film. Polyurethane and polyester probably do dampen the vibration of an acoustics soundboard, but I have some doubt if a solid body electric reaps as much benefit from a lacquer.

Hard core acoustic luthiers use oil finishes, thinned shellac, and other things, in the belief that even nitro lacquer dampens wood vibration too much. But like I said, that crew is very, very, hard core..



The site software wouldn't let me type out the name of this product....
Last edited by Captaincranky at Jun 15, 2013,