#1
I don't know if that's the actual name for the technique, but that's what my dad calls it so I'll go with it. For an example of it in action, here's Malmsteen: http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=d_FxSG5yMSg

I can just about do it sometimes, but its really sloppy and imprecise. Often, as I go up the strings, towards the low E, I end up twisting the volume nob from 3 instead of 0 and not really getting the swelling effect properly; accidentally let go of the volume nob; accidentally leave the volume off for a note etca...basically, I'm awful at it. Above all, I really don't know how to practise it, so I was wondering if anyone could give some pointers to help me with this technique?

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#2
Some things that helped me
1. Learning to pick the note a hair before it's supposed to sound so you have enough time to swell the note on the beat.
2. Finding the sweet spot for where the volume cuts and where it caps. That way, you don't end up turning the knob more than is necessary.
3. Having a sensitive volume pot is important - it's much easier to do this technique on a guitar with a very sensitive volume pot. I have much more trouble, for instance, doing this on a GIO Ibanez than on my RG, probably becaused I replaced the volume pot on the latter to be more responsive.
4. Having numbered volume knobs. This one is really obvious - you can find the sweet spot for swelling the note much more easily with numbered controls than blank ones.

Yngwie has all of these at his disposal in this video, plus years of practice time and scary 80s hair (the most potent tool in any guitarist's arsenal).
#3
I can do it fine with my Jackson, the EMG pots turn very freely, but on my Prestige it's really hard to turn fast with my pinky. I prefer a stiffer vol control if it's close to my hand or I move it by accident sometimes, so I hardly swell notes fast anymore now. Be nice to make it so I could have it free, then turn a little nut and make it have some resistance.
#4
Quote by Geldin
Some things that helped me
1. Learning to pick the note a hair before it's supposed to sound so you have enough time to swell the note on the beat.
2. Finding the sweet spot for where the volume cuts and where it caps. That way, you don't end up turning the knob more than is necessary.
3. Having a sensitive volume pot is important - it's much easier to do this technique on a guitar with a very sensitive volume pot. I have much more trouble, for instance, doing this on a GIO Ibanez than on my RG, probably becaused I replaced the volume pot on the latter to be more responsive.
4. Having numbered volume knobs. This one is really obvious - you can find the sweet spot for swelling the note much more easily with numbered controls than blank ones.

Yngwie has all of these at his disposal in this video, plus years of practice time and scary 80s hair (the most potent tool in any guitarist's arsenal).

1. Hadn't actually thought of that, surprisingly, will bear that in mind
2-4) I'm using a cheap knockoff stratocaster, and there is a problem in that the volume nob isn't grounded very well and sometimes makes a crackling sound when touched, but I'm gonna try fix that up soon when I start to modify the guitar.

Quote by Tempoe
I can do it fine with my Jackson, the EMG pots turn very freely, but on my Prestige it's really hard to turn fast with my pinky. I prefer a stiffer vol control if it's close to my hand or I move it by accident sometimes, so I hardly swell notes fast anymore now. Be nice to make it so I could have it free, then turn a little nut and make it have some resistance.


Yeah, that would be useful, all my other guitars have a much stiffer volume nob for the same reason, so I can only really practise it on my strat.

"The mind is its own place, and in itself

Can make a Heav'n of Hell, a Hell of Heav'n"

- John Milton, Paradise Lost
#5
Yngwie has the knob turn pretty well integrated into his picking, it looks like. Notice he's rolling the knob from back side so it's part of the same motion as his downstroke.
#7
Quote by metallicafan616
1. Hadn't actually thought of that, surprisingly, will bear that in mind
2-4) I'm using a cheap knockoff stratocaster, and there is a problem in that the volume nob isn't grounded very well and sometimes makes a crackling sound when touched, but I'm gonna try fix that up soon when I start to modify the guitar.


Yeah, that would be useful, all my other guitars have a much stiffer volume nob for the same reason, so I can only really practise it on my strat.

It's a really easy fix to do if you have a rudimentary understanding of wiring. I'd just outright replace the pot (ask around the Electric Guitar forum to see what they'd rec; I'm not too well versed in pots myself). The biggest danger was burning my fingertips because I'm too lazy to grab a pair of pliers.