#1
i'm fixing up an old guitar to sell. when i put the cable in, it just crackles like hell until i find that one sweet spot. i cut the wires of the input jack and rewired it last night, but didn't test it afterwards because i was just too tired. i stopped by guitar center after work today and bought a new input jack, but i'm assuming the stock one is mono and the new one is stereo. the stock one has one prong that sits in the notch of the cable with two wire holes, and the stereo has two prongs and three wire holes.

the rewiring seemed to fix the crackling problem, but i'm trying to decide -
should i keep the new stereo input jack and put it on the guitar that i use? will it improve the sound at all?
or just return it?
#2
Well, it shouldn't matter too much - won't ruin anything. That is to say, I don't think it would.
Actually, if you wire it up properly and use a TRS jack (i.e. stereo) cable, then theoretically you'd actually improve things.
By that I mean, it wouldn't sound incredible suddenly, or even much better. However, it should be better signal quality, and less prone to suffering from any interference. That's the nature of stereo, just like XLR cables are stereo.
So yeah, I personally wouldn't return it.
#3
Just use a mono.

Unless you have active pickups, then use a stereo.
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#4
Quote by AcousticMetal99
Well, it shouldn't matter too much - won't ruin anything. That is to say, I don't think it would.
Actually, if you wire it up properly and use a TRS jack (i.e. stereo) cable, then theoretically you'd actually improve things.
By that I mean, it wouldn't sound incredible suddenly, or even much better. However, it should be better signal quality, and less prone to suffering from any interference. That's the nature of stereo, just like XLR cables are stereo.
So yeah, I personally wouldn't return it.



Wrong. As an electronics technician, I see this myth being used a lot. It's dead wrong.

Using a TRS jack on an unbalanced guitar signal with a balanced cable is not going to make it sound any better - even if you wire it properly.

You do not have a good understanding of why TRS/XLR is used and its benefits. In order to properly do this, the guitar's electronics MUST produce a balanced signal. A balanced signal can be created by a transformer. The balanced signal uses three conductors - signal +, signal - and ground. The two signal leads produce signals that are opposite polarity. When the signal reaches it's destination, the minus signal is inverted, which causes any noise induced on the cable to be cancelled. This is the benefit of balanced systems - they can also carry signals over longer distances than unbalanced cables.

Most guitars do not have the capability of generating the two inverted signals, hence they cannot generate a balanced signal. In this case, you can still use a TRS jack, but you have to tie two of the lines together. Taylor Guitars produce an active pickup system for their acoustic guitars known as the ES system. The ES pickup system is balanced. FWIW, Rivera amplifiers makes an acoustic amplifier specifically for Taylor acoustic guitars with the ES system - The Rivera Sedona ES has two inputs - one of them is balanced.

Stereo IS prone to picking up interference. Stereo IS NOT balanced. Why? Because you're sending two signals with the same polarity. Remember, balanced sends both a positive and a negative version of the same signal - this is why it's balanced.

So, using an XLR or TRS connector on an unbalanced guitar signal, even if it's gold plated, will have zero impact on the sound quality. It will neither improve it nor degrade it.
Last edited by KG6_Steven at Jun 16, 2013,