#1
There's this local band in my state with a pretty unique guitarist that I've never been able to get in contact with. the guitarist plays this type of scale or mode alot, and it sounds really weird but cool at the same time. Could anyone point me in the right direction of what it is?

Basically the entire solo at 2:18
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKFWPZbYx5U


Also he plays something similar in the fills around 2:10 (2:12 to be exact)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hm5v2ZX2RyI&list=PLN7YyXdUi-7hJlMMAnM8xtibVXtwG2_t5&index=5

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!
Last edited by kashmir0109 at Jun 20, 2013,
#3
These kids are pretty solid.

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#5
Quote by kashmir0109
There's this local band in my state with a pretty unique guitarist that I've never been able to get in contact with. the guitarist plays this type of scale or mode alot, and it sounds really weird but cool at the same time. Could anyone point me in the right direction of what it is?

Basically the entire solo at 2:18
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=nKFWPZbYx5U


Also he plays something similar in the fills around 2:05
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=hm5v2ZX2RyI&list=PLN7YyXdUi-7hJlMMAnM8xtibVXtwG2_t5&index=5

Any help would be greatly appreciated. Thanks!

Yeah, the solo in the first song uses diminished arpeggios and in the end just pentatonic scale. The fill in the second song is just pentatonic scale. But the scale on its own won't make you sound like him. You need to learn to use it. You can do cool stuff with any notes if you can use them right. So the main question shouldn't be what scale, it should be how to use the notes right.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

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#8
It's just diminished triads based on the song's key, E. So play some Edim7 arpeggios and you'll be set.
#9
^^^ Yep Randy Rhodes used to do aimilar stuff. Most of the above is just the minor pentatonic though.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#10
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Yeah, the solo in the first song uses diminished arpeggios and in the end just pentatonic scale. The fill in the second song is just pentatonic scale. But the scale on its own won't make you sound like him. You need to learn to use it. You can do cool stuff with any notes if you can use them right. So the main question shouldn't be what scale, it should be how to use the notes right.


No way the second fills are minor pentatonic??

Thanks everyone else for the response. So Just outlining a Diminished chord?
#11
Quote by kashmir0109
No way the second fills are minor pentatonic??

Thanks everyone else for the response. So Just outlining a Diminished chord?

Yes, the fill at around 2:05 is definitely minor pentatonic.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#12
For some reason the dude in the video is doing diminished arpeggios on the song's tonic, E, instead of on one of the scale degrees that actually builds an unstable harmony. It's often called playing "out", because it's totally out of the key and is used to lead back to an in-key harmony. You usually see diminished licks only on unstable dominant and similar chords, so they sound extra weird on an already stable harmony.

In your own playing, examine the difference in sound between diminished arpeggios built on the root and those built on already dissonant areas in the key (scale degrees 2, #4, b6, and M7)

Also, the guy's pentatonic stuff is straight up Jimmy Page licks. Listen to "How Many More Times" and you'll probably hear the exact same ones.
#14
hmm id say prob listen to ol dime from pantera he uses that style alot in his solos you can apply that style to any pattern/scale or where ever you are on the fretbord and have some fun with it.
#15
Quote by MaggaraMarine
Yes, the fill at around 2:05 is definitely minor pentatonic.



I know the exact fill at 2:05 is. I mean the fills that come after in that entire verse. Listen to like 10 seconds afterword.
#16
Quote by cdgraves
For some reason the dude in the video is doing diminished arpeggios on the song's tonic, E, instead of on one of the scale degrees that actually builds an unstable harmony. It's often called playing "out", because it's totally out of the key and is used to lead back to an in-key harmony. You usually see diminished licks only on unstable dominant and similar chords, so they sound extra weird on an already stable harmony.

In your own playing, examine the difference in sound between diminished arpeggios built on the root and those built on already dissonant areas in the key (scale degrees 2, #4, b6, and M7)

Also, the guy's pentatonic stuff is straight up Jimmy Page licks. Listen to "How Many More Times" and you'll probably hear the exact same ones.


Thank you for the response. Wouldn't playing on the scale degree of #4 and b6 be out of key in the first place anyway? I probably have the very wrong idea about this.

Also I tried to sound it out, and in the second song it sounds like he starts the second fill in the verse (the first 'out' sounding one) is an arpeggio starting on the 3rd scale degree (G), does that mean its a G Diminished Arpeggio? Or how would I find the root of the diminished triad if they're all just minor thirds apart.
Thanks
Last edited by kashmir0109 at Jun 20, 2013,
#17
a minor scale with a #4 and flat 6th is a hungarian exotic scale. (if that was what you were implying). It brings tension but not dis-harmony.

Also. Because of my shitty phone speakers, all I can hear of the bass is some random bumps of what I think is an A# (tension tone). So it pretty much ruins the lead for me. But, am I the only one who slightly thought of Ron Jarzombek during that lead break?
#18
^^^ Lol @ Hungarian exotic scale. Just in case Hungary wasn't exotic enough, and the accidentals #4 ie. b5 is the blues scale, and b6 (I'm guessing you mean maj 6) is usually linked to dorian and regularly employed in blues. So basically the hungarians played a lot of blues.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#19
The fill at 2:12 sounds like diminished arpeggio and minor scale with a b5.

Who cares what the scale is called? Just figure out the licks he plays. They are all pretty much minor scale with accidentals.

This guitarist doesn't sound "unique" just because of the scales he uses. And IMO he doesn't even sound that unique. I mean, nothing bad with his playing, I think he plays well, but I hear nothing unique in his playing.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115
#20
Quote by MaggaraMarine


This guitarist doesn't sound "unique" just because of the scales he uses. And IMO he doesn't even sound that unique. I mean, nothing bad with his playing, I think he plays well, but I hear nothing unique in his playing.


it's mostly the juxtaposition. it's a neoclassical lick he picked up from the 80s jammed into a simple blues rock song. sounds pretty poorly executed/thought out but it does work in an interesting way.

it's like wayne brady, things that make you go "hm"
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#21
The what scale? it's an arpeggio, it doesn't have to relate to the key by name.

Quote by AlanHB
^^^ Lol @ Hungarian exotic scale. Just in case Hungary wasn't exotic enough, and the accidentals #4 ie. b5 is the blues scale, and b6 (I'm guessing you mean maj 6) is usually linked to dorian and regularly employed in blues. So basically the hungarians played a lot of blues.


I was saying it's usually effective to use diminished arpeggios on scale degrees that resolve by half step to a note in the tonic chord (or whatever chord is happening at the moment). b6 would resolve downward to 5, and is pretty much the same as playing a V7b9.
Last edited by cdgraves at Jun 21, 2013,
#22
^^^ Sure - I was just making fun of the name. The resulting scale isn't very exotic or Hungarian.
And no, Guitar Hero will not help. Even on expert. Really.
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#23
Quote by MaggaraMarine
The fill at 2:12 sounds like diminished arpeggio and minor scale with a b5.

Who cares what the scale is called? Just figure out the licks he plays. They are all pretty much minor scale with accidentals.

This guitarist doesn't sound "unique" just because of the scales he uses. And IMO he doesn't even sound that unique. I mean, nothing bad with his playing, I think he plays well, but I hear nothing unique in his playing.


I got caught up over my head with the theory and can't follow now :/

And maybe not unique, but just impressive given the wankers that I normally hear playing guitar in the local band scene in my city.
#24
Quote by kashmir0109
I got caught up over my head with the theory and can't follow now :/

And maybe not unique, but just impressive given the wankers that I normally hear playing guitar in the local band scene in my city.

OK, I'm not saying this guitarist is bad or anything. IMO he just wasn't that unique, that's all. I think he played really well.

But the thing is, the licks he plays aren't that unusual. Diminished arpeggios are pretty basic stuff - not heard on every solo but still nothing I haven't heard before. OK, as somebody said, he uses diminished arpeggios in places where you don't usually hear them. But scales alone don't make you sound like him. You need to learn to use the scales the right way. There's more to it than just scales. It's about your phrasing that makes you sound like you. Of course everybody also has their own "signature licks" and the diminished arpeggio seems like this guy's signature lick.
Quote by AlanHB
Just remember that there are no boring scales, just boring players.

Gear

Bach Stradivarius 37G
Charvel So Cal
Hartke HyDrive 210c
Ibanez BL70
Laney VC30
Tokai TB48
Yamaha FG720S-12
Yamaha P115