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#1
So I'm writing something and I needed to know something that I can't look up on google so i thought I'd ask you guys for help


I wanted examples of stories from different cultures around the world (in their folklore/mythology) that have this theme: man's curiosity and desire for more beyond what he should seek. leading to his demise and loss of everything.
I'm sure it's a recurring theme in all different cultures, I just can't find enough examples

any Ideas?
#2
Butt Sluts 17.
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I can fap to this. Keep going.
#4
Does anybody remember my King Midas-esque story about the guy who could turn poop into gold and ended up stuck in a chemical toilet?

Yeah that.

Or at least King Midas in general
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#6
Quote by Alijonroth
So I'm writing something and I needed to know something that I can't look up on google so i thought I'd ask you guys for help


I wanted examples of stories from different cultures around the world (in their folklore/mythology) that have this theme: man's curiosity and desire for more beyond what he should seek. leading to his demise and loss of everything.
I'm sure it's a recurring theme in all different cultures, I just can't find enough examples

any Ideas?

Maybe you should actually try researching so you can learn how to find these things.

Quote by ehbacon
The tale of Daedalus and Icarus is a good one

If you found how this story is categorized, that sounds like your answer.
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Why would you spend tens of thousands of dollars to learn about a language you already speak? It was over before it even started dude

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brot pls
#8
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Dr. Faustus

Robert Johnson
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#9
Quote by Eastwinn
read tales from ovid and do your own homework



this is not homework, I'm 26 and a working man. more of a personal interest ;-)
#10
thanks for the serious input you guys, anything from Norse mythology or far eastern folklore? I already know some stuff from 1001 Arabian nights and I know some Greek mythology but I'm a bit oblivious to the rest. cant think of anything pharaoh that's like that too, but maybe there is something I don't know
#11
There was a man who lived in Romania in 1458. This man spent most of his life working his way to the top of social ladder by being a blacksmith. One day, the man was invited to the regions castle to speak with the ruler about creating new torture devices that would strike fear in the hearts of the ruler's enemies.

It is said that, during that cold night, the man went to the castle and spoke to the ruler, but hearing his plans to use the man's skill to create machines that exist to torment and bring pain to people, he refused and left the castle. He dawned his carriage and drove away from the castle, however, before he left, the ruler said to him, "They who refuse my demands shall know true fear". As the man was remembering that statement, out of nowhere, his carriage was knocked off the mountain side he was traveling on. His body was found by some of the inhabitants in the area, but it was not the body of a man who simply fell to his death, no, he was pale and drained of blood. When the inhabitants saw the body, they recalled the rumor of the ruler attacking and drinking the blood of his enemies, but then...they saw....THIS!



DRACUCAT!
#12
Quote by Jackal58
Butt Sluts 17.


Very inspiring story. The riveting tale of how the Butt Sluts lust for butts proved too much in the epic adventure. What started out as a simple curiosity for butts leads the Butt Sluts to uncontrollable bowel movements and anal leakage.
you're never as free as when you are lost
#13
There's an irish story about a gambling man who is walking down a road, meets both God and Death along the way, and he manages to cheatand fool death a couple of times, and get an incredible skill for gambling. I'm not too sure exactly what happens in the end. I think he loses everything bar his talent for cards, goes to hell and is then kicked out of hell for being too good at cards.

It's called Cearrbach Mac Caba. A quick google search and I couldn't find the Irish or the English text online though.
#14
Quote by Alijonroth
So I'm writing something and I needed to know something that I can't look up on google so i thought I'd ask you guys for help


I wanted examples of stories from different cultures around the world (in their folklore/mythology) that have this theme: man's curiosity and desire for more beyond what he should seek. leading to his demise and loss of everything.
I'm sure it's a recurring theme in all different cultures, I just can't find enough examples

any Ideas?

Multiple characters in the Ilias have that.

Prometheus.
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ಠ_ಠ
#16
Quote by Alijonroth

I'm sure it's a recurring theme in all different cultures, I just can't find enough examples

Definitely.
Prometheus comes to mind, along with Icarus and Phaeton. The Greeks loved this stuff. If you want hipster cred, try Lemminkainen's trials from the Kalevala. It's public-domain; there's a copy on Project Gutenberg with a good English translation.
Last edited by Cavalcade at Jun 17, 2013,
#17
Quote by jimmy_neutron
There's an irish story about a gambling man who is walking down a road, meets both God and Death along the way, and he manages to cheatand fool death a couple of times, and get an incredible skill for gambling. I'm not too sure exactly what happens in the end. I think he loses everything bar his talent for cards, goes to hell and is then kicked out of hell for being too good at cards.

It's called Cearrbach Mac Caba. A quick google search and I couldn't find the Irish or the English text online though.



that sounds like it could be an incredible read
#18
slackerbabbath
slackerbabbath
slackerbabbath
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
#19
Quote by Alijonroth
that sounds like it could be an incredible read



Once you get past the fact it was in irish, i remember it being a fairly entertaining read. You'll have a hard job finding the text in Irish online though, let alone in English. You could try asking the Irish Thread, if someone is in still in the leaving cert they could help you.
#20
Quote by Hydra150
slackerbabbath
slackerbabbath
slackerbabbath



is there a way to summon someone into your thread?
#21
Quote by Alijonroth
is there a way to summon someone into your thread?

Well it would have worked if you hadn't just jinxed the spell
██████████████████████████
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██████████████████████████


LET'S GO BUCKS
#22


...

you're lucky I know what I'm doing here;

htabbabrekcals
htabbabrekcals
htabbabrekcals

should be with you at the crack of noon
But boys will be boys and girls have those eyes
that'll cut you to ribbons, sometimes
and all you can do is just wait by the moon
and bleed if it's what she says you ought to do
Last edited by Hydra150 at Jun 17, 2013,
#23
You asked about Norse mythology. There's not much in there that I can think of; most of the Völsunga Saga, for example, is the Norse gods giving the Völsungs everything they want, and everyone else getting jealous and trying to take it. I guess that kind of counts, but the "bad guys" aren't meant to be tragic figures, and the "good guys" are kind of dicks.
#24
Wait until Slacker gets in here.
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#26
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nibelungenlied

Some aspects could be seen as something you're looking for.

There's actually a film version based on the opera Der Ring des Nibelungen made by Wagner which is in turn based on this...
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"so you mean if the father is sterile, the kid will be sterile too?"

Proof God exists and evolution is a lie:
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the prove is u because u did n create urself and ur parents dindt and their parents didnt and so on and we are not monkeys peace

#28
Quote by Rust_in_Peace34
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nibelungenlied

Some aspects could be seen as something you're looking for.

There's actually a film version based on the opera Der Ring des Nibelungen made by Wagner which is in turn based on this...

Nibelungenlied Wagner's version is basically Völsung fanfiction in opera form.
Last edited by Cavalcade at Jun 18, 2013,
#30
I'm no expert, but I'm excellent at making shit up.
BOOM-SHAKALAKALAKA-BOOM-SHAKALAKUNGA
#31
Sorry I'm late. I was busy painting.


Bluebeard
The Metamorphoses of Apuleius
Hansel and Gretel
The Goose That Laid the Golden Eggs
#32
Quote by Neo Evil11
Multiple characters in the Ilias have that.

Prometheus.


The only thing Prometheus lost was his liver. Over, and over, and over as it regrew. Until he was saved by Heracles, and then he gained a free meal, eating the eagle that repeatedly ate his liver. So if anything, Prometheus gave fire to humans AND received a net gain in livers.

EDIT: Plus, Prometheus wasn't a man. He did create man, though, because f*ck Zeus.

Anyways, the story of Adam and Eve is a perfect example of what TS is looking for. Eve was tricked and gave in to her desire to know more, and got shafted because of it. Pandora's Box is almost identical, but instead of there being an active trickster, the Gods knew her curiosity/desire would get the better of her.
Last edited by Deliriumbassist at Jun 18, 2013,
#33
Quote by Alijonroth
So I'm writing something and I needed to know something that I can't look up on google so i thought I'd ask you guys for help


I wanted examples of stories from different cultures around the world (in their folklore/mythology) that have this theme: man's curiosity and desire for more beyond what he should seek. leading to his demise and loss of everything.
I'm sure it's a recurring theme in all different cultures, I just can't find enough examples

any Ideas?

well my first thought is why can't this be looked up on google
#34
Quote by Deliriumbassist


Anyways, the story of Adam and Eve is a perfect example of what TS is looking for. Eve was tricked and gave in to her desire to know more, and got shafted because of it. Pandora's Box is almost identical, but instead of there being an active trickster, the Gods knew her curiosity/desire would get the better of her.

Agreed, another good example in the Book of Genesis would be the fate of Lot's wife after Sodom was destroyed by God. An angel had told Lot and his family to "Flee for your life! Do not look behind you, nor stop anywhere in the Plain" but Lot's wife looked behind them and was turned into a pillar of salt as punishment for letting her curiosity get the better of her and disobeying the angels' warning. Another interpretation was that it was the sight of God descending down to rain destruction upon Sodom and Gomorrah that caused her to be turned to salt.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Jun 18, 2013,
#35
Isn't there the Woodcutter story thing with the bronze, silver and gold axe?

Protagonist was the winner, but that side guy got screwed over pretty bad.
#36
Quote by SlackerBabbath
Agreed, another good example in the Book of Genesis would be the fate of Lot's wife after Sodom was destroyed by God. An angel had told Lot and his family to "Flee for your life! Do not look behind you, nor stop anywhere in the Plain" but Lot's wife looked behind them and was turned into a pillar of salt for as punishment for letting her curiosity get the better of her and disobeying the angels' warning. Another interpretation was that it was the sight of God descending down to rain destruction upon Sodom and Gomorrah that caused her to be turned to salt.


It's amazing how much Christianity isn't brought up in mythological conversations. It's obviously to do withthe fact we're brought up with it, but I wonder if other countries study the stories from the Bible in the same way we may widely study, for example, Hesiod's Theogony, however basic.
#37
Quote by Deliriumbassist
It's amazing how much Christianity isn't brought up in mythological conversations. It's obviously to do withthe fact we're brought up with it, but I wonder if other countries study the stories from the Bible in the same way we may widely study, for example, Hesiod's Theogony, however basic.


It all looks to be loosely related when you look into it. Hesiod lived around the 8th – 7th century BC, and his Theogony has similar ideas in it about creation from chaos to the Hindu cosmology, which was based on the Vedic, (about 1000-500 BC) and it also has similarities to the Babylonian creation story in the Enuma Elish (dated to a little earlier than 1000 BC) which the Biblical creation story in Genesis (dated to around 500 BC) is thought to have been based upon.
Last edited by SlackerBabbath at Jun 18, 2013,
#38
I'm loving this thread and all the educated responses you people are giving thank you, looks like I have a lot of reading ahead of me, interesting reading cheers!
#39
The story about King Josiah and the Book of Law is pretty inspiring. Check that out!
“Sometimes you climb out of bed in the morning and you think, I'm not going to make it, but you laugh inside — remembering all the times you've felt that way.”
― Charles Bukowski


Twitter if you want
#40
Quote by SlackerBabbath
It all looks to be loosely related when you look into it. Hesiod lived around the 8th – 7th century BC, and his Theogony has similar ideas in it about creation from chaos to the Hindu cosmology, which was based on the Vedic, (about 1000-500 BC) and it also has similarities to the Babylonian creation story in the Enuma Elish (dated to a little earlier than 1000 BC) which the Biblical creation story in Genesis (dated to around 500 BC) is thought to have been based upon.


I'm fully aware of how different creation stories all borrow/evolve from each other, even in different continents (aliens? ). What I'm referring to is if a child in another culture could refer to, say, Isaiah or Archangel Michael in the same way we would have a knowledge of Zeus or Janus as mythological characters.
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